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Preliminary energy balance and economics of a farm-scale ethanol plant

Description: The energy balance and economics of grain to ethanol plants are matters of current national interest, as we strive to deal with our liquid fuel supply problems. This report prepared at the request of the Department of Energy, examines the energy balance and economic questions for a particular farm-scale plant in Campo, Colo. It shows that such plants may have a place in our national liquid fuel supply system.
Date: May 1, 1980
Creator: Jantzen, D. & McKinnon, T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Heating facilities: Klamath Lutheran Church, Klamath Falls, Oregon

Description: The Klamath Lutheran Church is a masonry structure with cathedral ceiling containing approximately 5800 sq ft of floor area. This building is currently heated by two duct furnaces and a unit heater all of which are gas fired. An Educational Wing of approximately 6300 sq ft was added in 1958. This building, containing 2 assembly rooms and a number of classrooms is of uninsulated frame construction, with extensive glass area. A gas-fired boiler supplying finned tube radiators currently heats this wing. Four specific options for displacing all or part of the heating duty with geothermal were examined. These options are: case 1 - drilling a production and injection well on the property and using the resultant hot water (180/sup 0/F) to heat the entire facility; case 3 - using effluent from the Klamath Union High School to heat the entire facility; no well drilling required; case 2 - using effluent from the Klamath Union High School to heat only the church building; the present gas boiler would heat the Educational Wing; and case 4 - drilling a production and injection well on the property and using the resulting water (70/sup 0/F) to supply a water-to-water heat pump. Of the four cases examined, case 3 (heating of both the church building and educational wing with effluent from the Klamath Union High School) seems to offer the greatest potential and earliest simple payback period. (MHR)
Date: August 1, 1980
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Demonstration of energy conservation for multi-deck board dryers: Phase I. Final report

Description: A study to determine the feasibility of recovering and reusing heat from a large multi-deck dryer used in the manufacture of roof insulation board is described. Pilot scale tests and analyses show that heat recovery designs utilizing several types of heat exchange equipment are feasible. These include: indirect contact air-to-air heat exchangers for preheating combustion air for the dryer furnaces; direct contact air-to-water heat exchangers using water sprays to heat process water; and indirect contact air-to-liquid heat exchangers to heat recirculating liquid in a plant building heating system. (MCW)
Date: February 1, 1980
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Multi-Megawatt Organic Rankine Engine power plant (MORE). Phase IA final report: system design of MORE power plant for industrial energy conservation emphasizing the cement industry

Description: The Multi-Megawatt Organic Rankine Engine (MORE) program is directed towards the development of a large, organic Rankine power plant for energy conservation from moderate temperature industrial heat streams. Organic Rankine power plants are ideally suited for use with heat sources in the temperature range below 1100/sup 0/F. Cement manufacture was selected as the prototype industry for the MORE system because of the range of parameters which can be tested in a cement application. This includes process exit temperatures of 650/sup 0/F to 1110/sup 0/F for suspension preheater and long dry kilns, severe dust loading, multi-megawatt power generation potential, and boiler exhaust gas acid dew point variations. The work performed during the Phase IA System Design contract period is described. The System Design task defines the complete MORE system and its installation to the level necessary to obtain detailed performance maps, equipment specifications, planning of supporting experiments, and credible construction and hardware cost estimates. The MORE power plant design is based upon installation in the Black Mountain Quarry Cement Plant near Victorville, California.
Date: January 31, 1980
Creator: Bair, E.K.; Breindel, B.; Collamore, F.N.; Hodgson, J.N. & Olson, G.K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

TVA application of integrated onfarm fuel alcohol production system. Annual report

Description: This contract has provided for the documentation of the feasibility of fuel alcohol production with small onfarm facilities, and for the design and construction of an efficient and easily constructed production facility. A feasibility study and a preliminary design report have been prepared. A prototype facility has been designed and constructed with a design production rate of 10 gallons per hour of 190-proof ethanol. The components of the facility are readily available through normal equipment supply channels or can be primarily owner-constructed. Energy efficiency was also of prime consideration in the design, and heat recovery equipment is included where practical. A renewable fuel boiler is used for process heat. Applicable safety standards and environmental requirements were also incorporated into the design. Other project activities included modification of a pickup truck to use the hydrous alcohol produced, evaluation of vacuum distillation for onfarm units, and development of a computer program to allow detailed economic analyses of fuel alcohol production. Efforts were also initiated to evaluate nongrain feedstocks, develop a preliminary design for a low-cost wood-fired boiler, and evaluate packed distillation columns constructed of plastic pipe.
Date: January 1, 1980
Creator: Badger, P C & Pile, R S
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Browns Ferry waste heat greenhouse environmental control system design

Description: Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Tennessee Valley Authority and the Environmental Research Laboratory at the University of Arizona cooperated on the design of an experimental greenhouse located at TVA's Browns Ferry Nuclear Generating Station. Two greenhouse zones are heated by waste heat from the plant's condenser effluent. For comparison, a third greenhouse zone is heated conventionally (fossil-fueled burners) as a control. Design specifics for each of the three zones and a qualitative operating evaluation are presented.
Date: March 1, 1980
Creator: Olszewski, M.; Stovall, T.K.; Hicks, N.G.; Pile, R.S.; Burns, E.R. & Waddell, E.L. Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Industrial recovered-materials-utilization targets for the metals and metal-products industry

Description: The National Energy Conservation Policy Act of 1978 directs DOE to set targets for increased utilization of energy-saving recovered materials for certain industries. These targets are to be established at levels representing the maximum feasible increase in utilization of recovered materials that can be achieved progressively by January 1, 1987 and is consistent with technical and economic factors. A benefit to be derived from the increased use of recoverable materials is in energy savings, as state in the Act. Therefore, emhasis on different industries in the metals sector has been related to their energy consumption. The ferrous industry (iron and steel, ferrour foundries and ferralloys), as defined here, accounts for approximately 3%, and all others for the remaining 3%. Energy consumed in the lead and zinc segments is less than 1% each. Emphasis is placed on the ferrous scrap users, followed by the aluminum and copper industries. A bibliography with 209 citations is included.
Date: March 1, 1980
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Formation of calcium aluminates in the lime sinter process. [Extraction of alumina from fly ash]

Description: A study of the formation of several calcium aluminates from pure components in the lime sinter process was undertaken to determine the kinetics of formation and subsequent leaching using a dilute sodium carbonate solution. The composition CaO 61.98%, SiO/sub 2/ 26.67%, and Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ 11.53% was used. Isothermal sintering runs of 0.2 to 10.0 h were carried out at 1200, 1250, 1300, and 1350/sup 0/C. When the sintering temperature was below the eutectic temperature (1335/sup 0/C), the ternary mixture behaved like two binary systems, i.e. CaO-Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and CaO-SiO/sub 2/. Only one compound, 3CaO.SiO/sub 2/, was formed between CaO and SiO/sub 2/. With lower sintering temperature and shorter sintering time, the ..beta..-phase was dominant. However, when both temperature and time increased, more and more of the ..beta..-C/sub 2/S was transformed into the ..gamma..-phase. Several different aluminates were formed during the sintering of CaO and Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/. The compounds CaO.Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and 3CaO.Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ were observed at all tested sintering temperatures, while the 5CaO.3Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ phase was found only at 1200/sup 0/C and 12CaO.7Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ at 1250/sup 0/C or higher. The first compound formed between CaO and Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ was probably 12CaO.7Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, but the amount did not increase immediately with time. The first dominant compound between CaO and Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ was CaO.3Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/. When the calcium ion diffused through the product layer of CaO.Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, 3CaO.Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ was formed. If unreacted Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ were present after the formation of CaO.Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, CaO.2Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ would form. Subsequent leaching of the sinters showed that the extractable alumina in the products increased with both sintering temperature and time, reaching a max of about 90%. These extraction data corresponded very well to the quantities of aluminates in the ...
Date: March 1, 1980
Creator: Chou, K.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Residual-energy-applications program: support and integration report

Description: The proposed government-owned EAST Facility at the Savannah River Plant in Aiken, South Carolina, would provide capabilities for development and confidence testing of industrial heat pumps, high temperature bottoming cycles, low temperature Rankine cycle power generation systems, and absorption chillers. This work is one component of the Residual Energy Applications Program (REAP). Other documents provide initial considerations concerning the heat pump and power generation systems to be tested at EAST, policy, objectives and guidelines for operation of the facility, a preliminary conceptual design, and environmental data. This report describes support and integration activities that were performed during the contract year. The various elements that impact on the EAST Facility are discussed and an assessment of the EAST Facility mission is given. The report concludes with proposed milestones, schedules, and costs for design, construction, and operation of the facility.
Date: November 1, 1980
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Conference on energy research at historically black universities

Description: A conference was convened to present and discuss significant research and development in Historically Black Institutions (current and past); areas that show potential for inter-institutional collaboration and the sharing of facilities; existing capabilities to sustain funded research activities and future potential for expansion and enhancement; and appropriate arrangements for maximum interaction with industry and government agencies. Papers were presented at small group meetings in various energy research areas, and abstracts of the projects or programs are presented. The Solar Energy small group provided contributions in the areas of photovoltaics, biomass, solar thermal, and wind. Research reported on by the Fossil Fuel small group comprises efforts in the areas of fluidized bed combustion of coal, coal liquefaction, and oil shale pyrolysis. Five research programs reported on by the Conservation Research small group involve a summer workshop for high school students on energy conservation; use of industrial waste heat for a greenhouse; solar energy and energy conservation research and demonstration; energy efficiency and management; and a conservation program targeted at developing a model for educating low income families. The Environment Impact groups (2) presented contributions on physical and chemical impacts and biological monitors and impacts. The Policy Research group presented four papers on a careful analysis of the Equity issues; one on a model for examining the economic issue in looking at the interaction between energy technology and the state of the economy; and a second paper examined the institutional constraints on environmental oriented energy policy. Six additional abstracts by invited participants are presented. (MCW)
Date: January 1, 1980
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Preliminary market analysis for Brayton cycle heat recovery system characterization program. Subtask 5. 2 of phase I program plan

Description: The purpose of the task is to determine the market potential of the Brayton-cycle Subatmospheric System (SAS), especially as applied to the glass processing industry. Areas which impact the sales of the Brayton-cycle systems examined are: market size; opportunities for waste heat system installation (furnace rebuild and repair); pollution control on glass furnaces; equipment costs; equipment performance; and market growth potential. Supporting data were compiled for the glass industry inventory and are presented in Appendix A. Emission control techniques in the glass industry are discussed in Appendix B. (MCW)
Date: August 31, 1980
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development and production cost analysis for subatmospheric Brayton system for Brayton-cycle heat-recovery system, characterization program, Subtask A. 4. 2. 4 of Phase I program plan

Description: This document reports on the cost analysis previously performed for a subatmospheric Brayton cycle system sized to operate off the waste heat of a nominal 200-ton per day glass container furnace. Along with product value and operating costs, the cost data for system components is one of the essential elements required for analyses and prediction of the return-on-investment for a Brayton system. The expected ROI or payback will in turn impact the marketability of the system. This report describes estimated costs in 1978 dollars for both the first development system and for a mature system. Development system costs include design, fabrication, and test cost elements for each major component as well as identified tooling costs.
Date: June 30, 1980
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Feasibility study: fuel cell cogeneration in a water pollution control facility. Final report

Description: A conceptual design study was conducted to investigate the technical and economic feasibility of a cogeneration fuel cell power plant operating in a large water pollution control facility. In this particular application, the fuel cell power plant would use methane-rich digester gas from the water pollution control facility as a fuel feedstock to provide electrical and thermal energy. Several design configurations were evaluated. These configurations were comprised of combinations of options for locating the fuel cell power plant at the site, electrically connecting it with the water pollution control facility, using the rejected power plant heat, supplying fuel to the power plant, and for ownership and operation. A configuration was selected which met institutional/regulatory constraints and provided a net cost savings to the industry and the electric utility. The displacement of oil and coal resulting from the Bergen County Utilities Authority application was determined. A demonstration program based on the selected configuration was prepared to describe the scope of work, organization, schedules, and costs from preliminary design through actual tests and operation. The potential market for nationwide application of the concept was projected, along with the equivalent oil displacement resulting from estimated commercial application.
Date: February 1, 1980
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Demonstration of energy conservation for multi-deck board dryers. Phase I. Final report

Description: A study was made to determine the feasibility of recover and reuse of low level heat from the exhausts of multi-deck dryers used to dry boards in the building materials industry. There are approximately 1000 dryers of this type in the USA, with no heat recovery equipment. These dryers are used in the manufacture of: roof insulation board, ceiling tile and panel stock, wood fiber sheathing, gypsum board, and veneer plywood. Pilot scale tests and analyses show that heat recovery designs utilizing several types of heat exchange equipment are feasible. These include the following: indirect contact air-to-air heat exchangers for preheating combustion air for the dryer furnaces; direct contact air-to-water heat exchangers using water sprays to heat process water; and indirect contact air-to-liquid heat exchangers to heat recirculating liquid in a plant building heating system. The systems recommended for design and installation at the Rockdale plant include all three of the types of heat exchangers. The preliminary estimate for the installed cost for these systems at the Rockdale plant is $565,000 (1979 dllars). Annual heat recovery of 186,000 million Btu is projected with a value of $545,000 using gas costs of $3.00 per million Btu. Payback based on a discounted cash flow analysis using ten year depreciation is about two years.
Date: February 8, 1980
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Open-cycle heat pumps for industrial waste-heat utilization. Project technical report, May 12, 1980-October 10, 1980. Phase I. Feasibility study

Description: Open-Cycle Industrial Process Heat Pumps (IPHP) are potentially a cost-effective method of utilizing an industrial plant's waste heat. The objective of Phase I of the work was to determine the feasibility of an open-cycle industrial process heat pump. This was accomplished by the evaluation of four potential sites for the installation of open-cycle industrial process heat pump equipment. While it was the original plan to evaluate only three sites, the need for a fourth site became apparent upon completion of studies of the Amstar applications. On the basis of initial screening, it was decided to concentrate on the large waste stream at General Electric's NORYL facility (Selkirk, NY) and a smaller waste stream at the Schoeller Paper Company (Pulaski, NY). These two sites provided opportunities to exploit the features of the open-cyle IPHP without major site constraints. Site studies were conducted to obtain process information such as flow rates, process temperatures, dynamic behavior of the process streams, process control functions, and capacity/time schedules. Information relating to structure and utilities, floor loadings, physical space constraints, electric service, piping runs between equipment location, and waste water tapping points was gathered. These data were analyzed and resulted in the selection of two applications with acceptable thermodynamic performance.
Date: January 1, 1980
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Feasibility study: fuel cell cogeneration in a water pollution control facility. Final report

Description: A conceptual design study was conducted to investigate the technical and economic feasibility of a cogeneration fuel cell power plant operating in a large water pollution control facility. The fuel cell power plant would use methane-rich digester gas from the water pollution control facility as a fuel feedstock to provide electrical and thermal energy. Several design configurations were evaluated. These configurations were comprised of combinations of options for locating the fuel cell power plant at the site, electrically connecting it with the water pollution control facility, using the rejected power plant heat, supplying fuel to the power plant, and for ownership and operation. A configuration was selected which met institutional/regulatory constraints and provided a net cost savings to the industry and the electric utility. This volume of the report contains the appendices: (A) abbreviations and definitions, glossary; (B) 4.5 MWe utility demonstrator power plant study information; (C) rejected heat utilization; (D) availability; (E) conceptual design specifications; (F) details of the economic analysis; (G) detailed description of the selected configuration; and (H) fuel cell power plant penetration analysis. (WHK)
Date: February 1, 1980
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development of an energy consumption and cost data base for fuel cell total energy systems and conventional building energy systems

Description: This report describes the procedures and data sources used to develop an energy-consumption and system-cost data base for use in predicting the market penetration of phosphoric acid fuel cell total-energy systems in the nonindustrial building market. A computer program was used to simulate the hourly energy requirements of six types of buildings - office buildings, retail stores, hotels and motels, schools, hospitals, and multifamily residences. The simulations were done by using hourly weather tapes for one city in each of the ten Department of Energy administrative regions. Two types of building construction were considered, one for existing buildings and one for new buildings. A fuel cell system combined with electrically driven heat pumps and one combined with a gas boiler and an electrically driven chiller were compared with similar conventional systems. The methods of system simulation, component sizing, and system cost estimation are described for each system. The systems were simulated for a single building size for each building type. Methods were developed to extrapolate the system cost and performance data to other building sizes.
Date: July 1, 1980
Creator: Pine, G.D.; Christian, J.E.; Mixon, W.R. & Jackson, W.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Operator manual: high temperature heat pump

Description: Experimental data is being obtained from operating a high temperature heat pump system. The use of methanol as a working fluid will necessitate careful monitoring of refrigerant temperatures and pressures with chemical analysis performed on the working fluid during scheduled down time. Materials sent to vendors by Auburn University and quotes received by Auburn concerning equipment (compressor, evaporator, condensor, air heater, dryer, two accumulator tanks, and three expansion valves) are discussed. The simulated dryer and two accumulator tanks were designed by Auburn. The detailed design and pricing estimates are included. Additional information is presented on layout and construction; start-up; testing; shut down; scheduled maintenance and inspection; safety precautions; control system; and trouble shooting.
Date: March 4, 1980
Creator: Dyer, D.F.; Maples, G.; Burch, T.E. & Chancellor, P.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Experimental testing and analytical analysis of a plastic panel heat exchanger for greenhouse heating

Description: The performance of a plastic panel-type heat exchanger, suitable for greenhouse heating using low-grade (25 to 60/sup 0/C water) power plant reject heat, was investigated theoretically and experimentally. The theoretical analysis showed that a plastic panel heat exchanger would have an overall heat transfer coefficient, U/sub 0/, of about 18 w/m/sup 2/-/sup 0/C compared to about 12 w/m/sup 2/-/sup 0/C for a fin-tube heat exchanger, under typical greenhouse conditions. Furthermore the plastic heat exchanger would require less fan power due to reduced air pressure losses. The experimental data revealed a similar functional relationship for U/sub 0/ and air flow when compared with the theoretical calculations, however the experimental values of U/sub 0/ were consistently larger by 20 to 30%. It was concluded that a properly designed plastic heat exchanger can compete with metal fin tube type exchangers on a performance basis, but the plastic heat exchangers are 3 to 4 times larger by volume. However, because of the lower cost of plastic, a substantial cost reduction is expected. It appears that further study, examining heat exchanger lifetime, performance and costs, is warranted.
Date: February 1, 1980
Creator: Olszewski, M. & Thomas, J.F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Design manual. [High temperature heat pump for heat recovery system]

Description: The design and performance of a waste heat recovery system which utilizes a high temperature heat pump and which is intended for use in those industries incorporating indirect drying processes are described. It is estimated that use of this heat recovery system in the paper, pulp, and textile industries in the US could save 3.9 x 10/sup 14/ Btu/yr. Information is included on over all and component design for the heat pump system, comparison of prime movers for powering the compressor, control equipment, and system economics. (LCL)
Date: January 1, 1980
Creator: Burch, T.E.; Chancellor, P.D.; Dyer, D.F. & Maples, G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Preliminary study of adiabatic compressed-air energy storage in aquifers. [Performance analysis using CYCLOPS computer code]

Description: The use of petroleum fuel in compressed air energy storage (CAES) can be eliminated by using an adiabatic cycle where the heat of compression generated during the charge cycle is stored for use during the discharge cycle. The adiabatic cycle can be combined with aquifer compressed air storage. This combination has the unique feature of allowing the aquifer to act as a thermal energy storage (TES) unit reducing the size of the required man-made TES. In this study TES types and cycle arrangements suitable for use with aquifer compressed air energy storage were investigated and six cycle arrangements were chosen for comparison with a reference conventional aquifer CAES facility. Concept performance was modeled using the CYCLOPS computer code and the results were used as the basis of an economic evaluation. In the economic evaluation, the levelized busbar energy cost was calculated for all concepts using a consistent set of ground rules and assumptions. The results of the economic evaluation indicate the adiabatic aquifer CAES demonstrates a lower cost of energy when compared to a conventional aquifer CAES facility.
Date: May 1, 1980
Creator: Drost, M.K.; Zaloudek, F.R. & Loscutoff, W.V.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Use of waste oils to improve densified refuse derived fuels. Final report

Description: The preparation and properties of densified refuse-derived fuel (d-RDF) had previously been studied. The objectives of this study were the reduction of the power consumption and increase in the throughput of the densifier, increase in the calorific value and of the resistance of the d-RDF to weathering during outdoor storage. It was believed that these objectives might be achieved by adding waste oils to RDF just before densification. The majority of such oil from local sources includes spent crankcase oils with a high content of lead. In the work reported here, office wastes were shredded, air classified, and reshredded prior to feeding to an animal feed densifier. Water was added to the densifier feed in order to investigate a range of moisture contents. Waste oil (from a local dealer) was pumped through spray nozzles onto the densifier feed at controlled flows so as to investigate a range of oil contents. It is observed that over the practical range of waste oil contents, the savings in power consumption with increasing oil content are small. The addition of waste oil (up to 15 wt %) to the feed did not cause noticeable improvements in throughput rates. As expected, the calorific value of the fuel increases in proportion to the amount of waste oil. Pellets containing 13 wt % oil resulted in having a 20% higher calorific content. Increased waste oil levels in RDF led to reduction in pellet lengths and densities. The addition of waste oil to RDF did not improve pellet water repellency.
Date: October 1, 1980
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fluidization characteristics of power-plant fly ashes and fly ash-charcoal mixtures.

Description: As a part of the continuing research on aluminum recovery from fly ash by HiChlor process, a plexiglass fluidization column system was constructed for measurement of fluidization parameters for power-plant fly ashes and fly ash-charcoal mixtures. Several bituminous and subbituminous coal fly ashes were tested and large differences in fluidization characteristics were observed. Fly ashes which were mechanically collected fluidized uniformly at low gas flow rates. Most fly ashes which were electrostatically precipitated exhibited channeling tendency and did not fluidize uniformly. Fluidization characteristics of electrostatically collected ashes improve when the finely divided charcoal powder is added to the mixture. The fluidization of the mixture was aided initially by a mechanical stirrer. Once the fluidization had succeeded, the beds were ready to fluidize without the assistance of a mechanical action. Smooth fluidization and large bed expansion were usually observed. The effects of charcoal size and aspect ratio on fluidization characteristics of the mixtures were also investigated. Fluidization characteristics of a fly ash-coal mixture were tested. The mixture fluidized only after being oven-dried for a few days.
Date: March 1, 1980
Creator: Nguyen, C. T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Problems associated with solid wastes from energy systems

Description: Waste streams from many energy-related technologies including coal, oil shale, tar sands, geothermal, oil and gas extraction, and nuclear power generation are reviewed with an emphasis on waste streams from coal and oil shale technologies. This study has two objectives. The first objective is to outline the available information on energy-related solid wastes. Data on chemical composition and hazardous biological characteristics are included, supplemented by regulatory reviews and data on legally designated hazardous waste streams. The second objective is to provide disposal and utilization options. Solid waste disposal and recovery requirements specified under the RCRA are emphasized. Information presented herein should be useful for policy, environmental control, and research and development decision making regarding solid and hazardous wastes from energy production.
Date: September 1, 1980
Creator: Chiu, S.Y.; Fradkin, L.; Barisas, S.; Surles, T.; Morris, S.; Crowther, A. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department