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Ultraprecision machining of optics at Los Alamos

Description: Ultraprecision machine tools are used at Los Alamos for single point diamond turning of optics and other precision parts. Measurements of a 50-mm-dia copper flat are used to illustrate the quality of a part which can be machined on the Moore No. 3 lathe. Measurements of a 0.4-m-dia aluminum mirror with a 20-m radius-of-curvature are presented as an example of a part machined on the Moore No. 5 lathe. A varying frequency sine wave grating is used to show a type of special optical grating which can be produced using the Pneumo lathe.
Date: January 1, 1981
Creator: Rhorer, R.L.; Gauler, A.L.; Colston, E.W. & Ruhe, J.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Symbiont system for intercomputer communication using shared memory. [MODCOMP IV/25 computers]

Description: Group P-9 at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory has three MODCOMP IV/25 computers. The configuration consists of a host computer and two satellite computers. It was decided to implement an intercommunication system using the shared memory feature of the system and symbionts. With this symbiont approach all MAX IV file I/O operations using REX services are supported. The operation of this system is described in some detail. Among the topics covered are system initialization, common block structure, resources of the tasks, error conditions, limitations, and speed. 6 figures. (RWR)
Date: January 1, 1976
Creator: Poore, R. V.; Sunier, J. W. & McMillan, D. E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Numerical algorithms and software for advanced computers

Description: The utilization of large-scale computers at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory and why scientists are constantly seeking bigger and faster computers are discussed. The trend toward increased parallelism within the architecture of supercomputers is noted, and how this parallelism is affecting software and algorithms is addressed. On the basis of this trend and characteristics of existing simulation models, some of the areas where future research will be needed are indicated. 5 figures.
Date: January 1, 1978
Creator: Buzbee, B.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

LASL's FY 1978 supporting research program

Description: This report gives a brief overview of Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory's supporting research program, including philosophy, management and program analysis, funding, and a brief description of the kinds of work currently supported. 10 figures.
Date: September 1, 1978
Creator: Hammel, E.F.; Merlan, S.J. & Freiwald, D.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

LASL integrated computer network. [Includes author's view of the future for computers and networks]

Description: PDP-11 minicomputers are used extensively at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory for networking a set of large scientific computers used for both batch and time-sharing applications. This paper describes the LASL Central Computing Facility network configuration, and includes some of the author's views of the future for computers and networks. 3 figures.
Date: January 1, 1976
Creator: Tolmie, D. E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

CRAY-1 at LASL: an update. [Background and current status]

Description: The background and current status of the CRAY-1 computer at LASL are reviewed. The characteristics of the CRAY-1 are summarized. Evaluation of the computer under carefully controlled conditions showed it to have performance and reliability characteristics that were well matched to the needs of LASL. Software development, networking, and code conversion have proceeded to where the CRAY-1 is now in early production status. It is expected that the CRAY-1, with enlarged memory and upgraded disk configuration, will become the most powerful worker computer at LASL. 2 figures, 3 tables. (RWR)
Date: January 1, 1977
Creator: Worlton, W. J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

In-house supervisory program for operations supervisors

Description: Additional lead operators were needed by the LASL computer operations group. The selection process and criteria are briefly described, and an example of the selection matrix is given. The new lead operators (and others) were in need of a brief course in basic supervision; the outline of the course provided is presented. 2 figures. (RWR)
Date: January 1, 1979
Creator: Barton, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Computer graphics in a multiple-system/multiple-device environment

Description: The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) has played a pioneering role in the development of electronic computation, and today its computing facilities are among the most extensive in the world. These facilities serve scientists from a wide range of disciplines, and are a critical resource for many diverse scientific research projects. The graphical display of computer-generated data has become one of the most valued and extensively used resources in the computing facilities. LASL scientists use a device-independent computer graphics system that provides a common interface for different operating environments on four kinds of computers. They can generate computer graphics on terminals, microfilm (with color), microfiche, or paper. The computing environment and the computer graphics system that supports that environment are described. 2 figures.
Date: January 1, 1980
Creator: Elliott, R.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Computing Division two-year operational plan, FY 1981-1982

Description: This report is a comprehensive planning guide for the Computing Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory for fiscal years 1981 and 1982. Subjects discussed include critical issues, programmatic requiements, hardware plans, software projects, direct user services, research projects, and projections of future developments.
Date: February 1, 1981
Creator: Euald, R.H.; Worlton, W.J. & McCormick, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Publications of LASL research, 1979

Description: This bibliography is a compilation of unclassified publications of work done at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory for 1979. Papers published in 1979 are included regardless of when they were actually written. Declassification of previously classified reports is considered to constitute publication. All classified issuances are omitted. If a paper was published more than once, all places of publication are included. The bibliography includes Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory reports, papers released as non-LASL reports, journal articles, books, chapters of books, conference papers (whether published separately or as part of conference proceedings issued as books or reports), papers published in congressional hearings, theses, and US patents. The entries are arranged in sections by broad subject categories. (RWR)
Date: November 1, 1980
Creator: Willis, J. K. & Salazar, C. A. (comps.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Experience with the CRAY-1 computer at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory

Description: The CRAY-1 computer (Serial No. 1) was installed at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) on April 1, 1976. This report describes experience with the CRAY-1 since that time. The first six months of the period were spent in a detailed evaluation of the hardware. The machine successfully passed the performance thresholds that had been established, and on October 1, 1976, it became available for productive use. Initial efforts were concentrated on achieving an early production capability for several large codes. In order to achieve this objective, a link was established between the CRAY-1 and CDC 7600 running the Livermore Time-Sharing System (LTSS). This link became operational in December 1976, and security approval was received in January 1977. The first major production code became operational in May 1977, and production usage has increased since that time. An operating system for the CRAY-1 that is tailored to the LASL computing environment is currently being developed. Several smaller-scale computers with extensive software facilities that will support the CRAY-1 are being obtained. 4 figures.
Date: January 1, 1977
Creator: Dorr, F. W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

LASL computerized quality assurance record-keeping system for analytical chemistry

Description: Research programs requiring quality assurance surveillance, certification procedures, and associated record keeping have increased markedly at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory. A computer-based system, accessible through time-sharing terminals, performs many routine operations, including continued records updating for equipment calibration, personnel certification, quality assurance procedure listings, and controlled-document distribution lists. The system described has operated successfully for more than a year, resulting in a significant savings in man-hours required to keep quality assurance records.
Date: June 1, 1976
Creator: Dahlby, J. W. & Phillips, J. R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Computer-assisted estimating for the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory

Description: An analysis is made of the cost estimating system currently in use at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) and the benefits of computer assistance are evaluated. A computer-assisted estimating system (CAE) is proposed for LASL. CAE can decrease turnaround and provide more flexible response to management requests for cost information and analyses. It can enhance value optimization at the design stage, improve cost control and change-order justification, and widen the use of cost information in the design process. CAE costs are not well defined at this time although they appear to break even with present operations. It is recommended that a CAE system description be submitted for contractor consideration and bid while LASL system development continues concurrently.
Date: February 1, 1976
Creator: Spooner, J. E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory long-range alarm system

Description: The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) Long-Range Alarm System is described. The last few years have brought significant changes in the Department of Energy regulations for protection of classified documents and special nuclear material. These changes in regulations have forced a complete redesign of the LASL security alarm system. LASL covers many square miles of varying terrain and consists of separate technical areas connected by public roads and communications. A design study over a period of 2 years produced functional specifications for a distributed intelligence, expandable alarm system that will handle 30,000 alarm points from hundreds of data concentrators spread over a 250-km/sup 2/ area. Emphasis in the design was on nonstop operation, data security, data communication, and upward expandability to incorporate fire alarms and the computer-aided dispatching of security and fire vehicles. All aspects of the alarm system were to be fault tolerant from the central computer system down to but not including the individual data concentrators. Redundant communications lines travel over public domain from the alarmed area to the central alarm station.
Date: January 1, 1980
Creator: DesJardin, R. & Machanik, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Innovations in Los Alamos alpha box design

Description: Destructive examinations of irradiated fuel pins containing plutonium fuel must be performed in shielded hot cells with strict provisions for containing the plutonium. Alpha boxes provide containment for the plutonium, toxic fission products, and other hazardous highly radioactive materials. The alpha box contains windows for viewing and a variety of transfer systems specially designed to allow transfers in and out of the alpha box without spread of the hazardous materials that are contained in the box. Alpha boxes have been in use in the Wing 9 hot cells at Los Alamos National Laboratory for more than 20 years. Features of the newly designed alpha boxes are presented.
Date: January 1, 1985
Creator: Ledbetter, J.M.; Dowler, K.E. & Cook, J.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Los Alamos National Laboratory Building Cost Index

Description: The Los Alamos National Laboratory Building Cost Index indicates that actual escalation since 1970 is near 10% per year. Therefore, the Laboratory will continue using a 10% per year escalation rate for construction estimates through 1985 and a slightly lower rate of 8% per year from 1986 through 1990. The computerized program compares the different elements involved in the cost of a typical construction project, which for our purposes, is a complex of office buildings and experimental laboratores. The input data used in the program consist primarily of labor costs and material and equipment costs. The labor costs are the contractural rates of the crafts workers in the Los Alamos area. For the analysis, 12 field-labor draft categories are used; each is weighted corresponding to the labor craft distribution associated with the typical construction project. The materials costs are current Los Alamos prices. Additional information sources include material and equipment quotes obtained through conversations with vendors and from trade publications. The material and equipment items separate into 17 categories for the analysis and are weighted corresponding to the material and equipment distribution associated with the typical construction project. The building cost index is compared to other national building cost indexes.
Date: January 1, 1983
Creator: Orr, H.D. & Lemon, G.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory building cost index

Description: The Controller's budget request for FY-1979 established guidance for escalation rates at 6 to 8 percent for construction projects beyond FY-1976. The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) has chosen to use an annual construction escalation rate of 10 percent. Results of this study should contribute toward the establishment of realistic construction cost estimate totals and estimates of annual construction funding requirements. Many methods were used to arrive at the LASL escalation rate recommendation. First, a computer program was developed which greatly expanded the number of materials previously analyzed. The program calculated the 1970 to 76 weighted averages for labor, materials, and equipment for the base line project. It also plotted graphs for each category and composite indexes for labor and material/equipment. Second, estimated increases for 1977 were obtained from several sources. The Zia Company provided labor cost estimates. Projected increases for material and equipment were obtained through conversations with vendors and analysis of trade publications. Third, economic forecast reports and the Wall Street Journal were used for source material, narrative, and forecast support. Finally, we compared LASL Building Cost Index with the effects of escalation associated with three recently developed projects at LASL.
Date: November 1, 1977
Creator: Lemon, G. D.; Morris, D. W. & McConnell, P. H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Los Alamos National Laboratory building cost index

Description: The Los Alamos National Laboratory Building Cost Index indicates that actual escalation since 1970 is near 10% per year. Therefore, the Laboratory will continue using a 10% per year escalation rate for construction estimates through 1985 and a slightly lower rate of 8% per year from 1986 through 1990. The computerized program compares the different elements involved in the cost of a typical construction project, which for our purposes, is a complex of office buildings and experimental laboratories. The input data used in the program consist primarily of labor costs and material and equipment costs. The labor costs are the contractual rates of the crafts workers in the Los Alamos area. For the analysis, 12 field-labor craft categories are used; each is weighted corresponding to the labor craft distribution associated with the typical construction project. The materials costs are current Los Alamos prices. Additional information sources include material and equipment quotes obtained through conversations with vendors and from trade publications. The material and equipment items separate into 17 categories for the analysis and are weighted corresponding to the material and equipment distribution associated with the typical construction project. The building cost index is compared to other national building cost indexes.
Date: October 1, 1982
Creator: Orr, H.D. & Lemon, G.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Los Alamos National Laboratory compliance with cultural resource management legislation

Description: Cultural resources management is one aspect of NEPA-induced legislation increasingly affecting federal land managers. A number of regulations, some of them recent, outline management criteria for protecting cultural resources on federal land. Nearly all construction projects at the 11,135 hectare Los Alamos National Laboratory in northern New Mexico are affected by cultural resource management requirements. A substantial prehistoric Puebloan population occupied the Laboratory area from the 13th to the early 16th centuries. Grazing, timbering, and homesteading followed Indian occupation. Therefore, archaeological and historical ruins and artifacts are abundant. The Laboratory has developed a cultural resources management program which meets both legal and project planning requirements. The program operates in coordination with the New Mexico State Historical Preservation Office. Major elements of the Laboratory program are illustrated by a current project involving relocation of a homesteader's cabin located on land required for a major new facility. The Laboratory cultural resource management program couples routine oversight of all engineering design projects with onsite resource surveys and necessary mitigation prior to construction. The Laboratory has successfully protected major archaeological and historical ruins, although some problems remain. The cultural resource program is intended to be adjustable to new needs. A cultural resource management plan will provide long-term management guidance.
Date: January 1, 1984
Creator: Olinger, C.E. & Rea, K.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department