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Experimental permeability studies at elevated temperature and pressure of granitic rocks

Description: Permeability of quartz monzonite from the Los Alamos hot-dry-rock geothermal well GT-2 was experimentally measured as a function of pressure and temperature. Permeability of the GT-2 rocks from depths of 8580 ft and 9522 ft behaves like Westerly granite for changes in effective confining pressure. However, permeability of these rocks behaves much differently with increasing temperature. As temperature is increased, the permeability of Westerly granite passes through a slight minimum and then increases exponentially above 100/sup 0/C. Upon cooling the permeability shows a permanent increase of up to four times its original value. The permeability of GT-2-9522', on the other hand, drops off exponentially with increasing temperature, reaching a minimum near 140/sup 0/C; above 150/sup 0/C, permeability rises slowly. These changes in permeability with temperature are postulated to be caused by differential thermal expansion (DTE), a phenomena related to the anisotropic and inhomogeneous coefficients of thermal expansion of the mineral grains in the rock. Scanning electron photomicrographs of unheated and heated samples of Westerly and GT-2 rocks support the DTE hypothesis. Differences in the behavior of these rocks with temperature are believed to be due to the respective temperature and pressure environments in which they became equilibrated, since both GT-2 rocks had existed at moderately high temperatures and pressures for some time. Temperature disequilibrium of the GT-2 rocks in their present in situ environments is believed to have caused the differences in the behavior between the two samples and may provide a method for determining the pre-intrusion geothermal gradient of the Jemez area. Flow channels were observed in GT-2 samples using radioactive tracer techniques. Several radioactive isotopes were tried in these experiments, including /sup 22/Na, /sup 63/Ni, and /sup 35/S.
Date: May 1, 1978
Creator: Potter, J.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Methodology for the determination of environmental /sup 129/I and /sup 99/Tc

Description: The Savannah River Laboratory is using existing techniques and developing new methodology to determine the environmental impact of the Savannah River Plant with regard to /sup 129/I and /sup 99/Tc. /sup 129/I is determined by neutron activation after the method of Brauer. Activation products are quantified by ..gamma..-ray spectroscopy (Ge(Li)) following chemical isolation. /sup 125/I is used as a yield tracer. /sup 129/I amounts as low as 3.8 fCi can be determined with 30-minute counting times. An isotope dilution method for /sup 99/Tc based on a three-stage surface ionization mass spectrometer is being developed. Its chemical isolation scheme ends with the Tc loaded on a single ion-exchange bead for enhanced mass-spectrometric sensitivity. /sup 97/Tc will be used as a yield tracer. A lower limit of 0.2 fCi is sought. A modified method using liquid scintillation counting has determined /sup 99/Tc in some aqueous samples. These methods have confirmed that /sup 129/I and /sup 99/Tc can be highly mobile in the aqueous environment, establishing the need for monitoring.
Date: January 1, 1978
Creator: Anderson, T. J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Relationship of dose rate and total dose to responses of continuously irradiated beagles

Description: Young-adult beagles were exposed continuously (22 hours/day) to /sup 60/Co ..gamma.. rays in a specially constructed facility. The exposure rates were either 5, 10, 17, or 35 R/day, and the exposures were terminated at either 600, 1400, 2000, or 4000 R. A total of 354 dogs were irradiated; 221 are still alive as long-term survivors, some after more than 2000 days. The data on survival of these dogs, coupled with data from similar preliminary experiments, allow an estimate of the LD/sub 50/ for ..gamma..-ray exposures given at a number of exposure rates. They also allow comparison of the relative importance of dose rate and total dose, and the interaction of these two variables, in the early and late effects after protracted irradiation. The LD/sub 50/ for the beagle increases from 258 rad delivered at 15 R/minute to approximately 3000 rad at 10 R/day. Over this entire range, the LD/sub 50/ is dependent upon hematopoietic damage. At 5 R/day and less, no meaningful LD/sub 50/ can be determined; there is nearly normal continued hematopoietic function, survival is prolonged, and the dogs manifest varied individual responses in other organ systems. Although the experiment is not complete, interim data allow several important conclusions. Terminated exposures, while not as effective as radiation continued until death, can produce myelogenous leukemia at the same exposure rate, 10 R/day. More importantly, at the same total accumulated dose, lower exposure rates are more damaging than higher rates on the basis of the rate and degree of hematological recovery that occurs after termination of irradiation. Thus, the rate of hematologic depression, the nadir of the depression, and the rate of recovery are dependent upon exposure rate; the latter is inversely related and the former two are directly related to exposure rate.
Date: January 1, 1978
Creator: Fritz, T. E.; Norris, W. P.; Tolle, D. V.; Seed, T. M.; Poole, C. M.; Lombard, L. S. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Resonance-averaged (n,. gamma. ) spectra and their applications to nuclear structure. [J,. pi. , 2 and 24 keV]

Description: Because they populate final states without regard to the details of the nucleonic configurations, neutron-capture ..gamma.. rays are ideally suited for locating essentially all the low lying nuclear states whose spins lie within a few units of that of the capturing state. With the reduction of the Porter--Thomas fluctuations through the use of neutrons having an energy distribution broad enough to average over a finite (and large) number of capture resonances, the primary capture ..gamma..-ray intensities can provide rather definite spin-parity information for those states which they are observed to populate. The power of these studies is greatly enhanced through the analysis of such resonance-averaged spectra at two distinct neutron energies, approx. 2 and approx. 24 keV, obtained from Sc and Fe neutron ''filters'', respectively. The use of resonance-averaged primary ..gamma..-ray spectra as a tool for low-energy nuclear spectroscopy is discussed and its strengths and limitations pointed out. Examples are drawn from studies of 2- and 24-keV neutron capture in samples of /sup 154/ /sup 156/ /sup 157/ /sup 158/Gd and /sup 238/U. 20 references.
Date: January 1, 1978
Creator: Reich, C.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Preparations for high-level defense waste immobilization at Savannah River Plant

Description: Methods are being developed to immobilize Savannah River Plant (SRP) wastes in high-integrity glass forms. The waste forms will be suitable for storage in an on-site facility or for shipment to an off-site repository. Alkaline wastes produced in SRP separations plants are currently stored in large, carbon-steel tanks. These wastes consist of a water-soluble fraction (salt cake and supernatant liquor) and an insoluble sludge. The water-soluble fraction contains most of the /sup 137/Cs and the insoluble sludge contains most of the /sup 90/Sr, waste actinides, and other fission products. /sup 90/Sr and /sup 137/Cs are the most hazardous radionuclides in aged waste. A conceptual solidification process has been developed from laboratory tests with both actual and simulated waste. Engineering design studies are in progress. First, wastes are removed as a slurry from the waste tanks. The sludge is separated from the supernate, and then /sup 137/Cs is removed from the clarified supernate by ion exchange. The resulting decontaminated supernate is evaporated to a salt for bulk storage. In the second part of the process, /sup 137/Cs is mixed with sludge and the mixture is calcined and then solidified in borosilicate glass. Off-gas from the calciner and glass melter is treated to ensure that no hazardous materials are released to the atmosphere.
Date: January 1, 1978
Creator: Wiley, J.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Radiochemical examination of Peach Bottom HTGR component samples

Description: This document describes the results of a program conducted at General Atomic (GA) to radiochemically examine primary coolant circuit components of the Peach Bottom HTGR. The purpose of this program was to provide (1) absolute values of plateout activity in the primary coolant circuit, (2) fission gas release data for fuel compacts, (3) sorption data for cesium on fuel element graphite (spine and sleeve), and (4) diffusion coefficient data for cesium in fuel element graphite (spine and sleeve). The resulting plateout data consist of specific activities for Sr-90, Cs-134, and Cs-137. These were the only reportable activities found. Iodine was below the limits of detection by neutron activation analysis. The Sr-90 activity ranged from about 5 to 10/sup -4/ to 9 x 10/sup -4/ ..mu..Ci/cm/sup 2/ in the cold duct and 2 x 10/sup -3/ to 9 x 10/sup -3/ ..mu..Ci/cm/sup 2/ in the steam generator. The strontium found was orders of magnitude lower than the Cs-137 values of about 0.8 to 4 ..mu..Ci/cm/sup 2/ in the cold duct and 2 to 12 ..mu..Ci/cm/sup 2/ in the steam generator. Additionally, it was found that the Cs-134 activity was, in general, higher than the Cs-137 activity throughout the primary helium coolant circuit. Post irradiation fission gas release tests on driver fuel element compacts gave R/B values for krypton and xenon somewhat higher than measured reactor values. It was determined by metallographic examination that the small failed fraction at end-of-life was appreciably hydrolyzed after the fuel was removed from the core. This explains the relatively high R/B values found in the postirradiation tests. Failure fractions determined by metallography are in good agreement with values determined by hot-chlorine leaching experiments at ORNL.
Date: August 1, 1978
Creator: Baldwin, N.L.; Norman, B.L. & Bell, W.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Vertical contamination in the unconfined groundwater at the Hanford Site, Washington

Description: Disposal to the ground at Hanford of large volumes of low- and intermediate-level wastes in the local unconfined groundwater flow system has raised concern about the movement and distribution of this waste. Previous work produced information on the horizontal movement of the waste, but little or no information exists on its vertical distribution within the unconfined groundwater flow system. In 1975 Phase I of a study was started to determine the vertical distribution of contaminants in three existing wells (699-28-40, 699-31-31, and 699-37-43). Because of negative results, only one well that produced positive results (699-31-31) was chosen for Phase II. Phase II consisted of tests conducted on this well by a testing company, with samples cross-checked by two different laboratories. Phase III was a cooperative study with Rockwell Hanford Operations, which included the installation, testing, and sampling of piezometers. The data were then analyzed using predictive codes and models in order to determine if vertical movement did occur. The present groundwater flow system shows some vertical contamination. However, concentrations are relatively higher near the surface of the flow system, indicating possible radial flow patterns from the groundwater mounds known to have developed under the chemical processing area disposal sites. Upward flow from deeper aquifers may be diluting the contaminant and masking a possible downward migration of contaminants.
Date: August 1, 1978
Creator: Eddy, P.A.; Myers, D.A. & Raymond, J.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Sequim Marine Research Laboratory routine environmental measurements during CY-1977

Description: Beginning in 1976, a routine environmental program was established at the Marine Research Laboratory (MRL) at Sequim, Washington. The program is intended to demonstrate the negligible impact of current MRL operations on the surrounding environs and to provide baseline data through which any cumulative impact could be detected. The sampling frequency is greater during the first 2 years of the program to provide sufficient initial information to allow reliable estimates of observed radionuclide concentrations and to construct a long-term sampling program. The program is designed, primarily, to determine levels of radioactivity present in selected biota in Sequim Bay. The biota were selected because of their presence near the laboratory and their capacity to concentrate trace elements. Other samples were obtained to determine the radionuclides in Sequim Bay and laboratory drinking water, as well as the ambient radiation exposure levels and surface deposition of fallout radionuclides for the laboratory area. Appendix A provides a summary of the analytical methods used. The present document includes data obtained during CY 1977 in addition to CY-1976 data published previously.
Date: June 1, 1978
Creator: Fix, J.J. & Blumer, P.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Nuclear waste management quarterly progress report, January--March 1978

Description: Significant research during this period was reported on: decontamination and densification of chop-leach cladding residues; monitoring methods for particulate and gaseous effluents from waste-solidification processes; TRU waste immobilization program; krypton solidification; /sup 14/C and /sup 129/I fixation; waste management system studies; waste management safety studies; waste isolation safety assessment program; well logging instrumentation development for shallow land burial; monitoring and physical characterization of unsaturated zone transport; detection and characterization of mobile organic complexes of fission products; and electropolishing for surface decontamination of metals. (LK)
Date: August 1, 1978
Creator: Platt, A. M. & Powell, J.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Nuclear waste management quarterly progress report, April--June 1978

Description: Work is reported in the following: decontamination and densification of chop-leach cladding residues; monitoring methods for particulate and gaseous effluents from waste solidification processes; TRU waste immobilization; krypton solidification; /sup 14/C and /sup 129/I fixation; system studies; safety studies; waste isolation safety assessment; well logging instrumentation for shallow land burial; monitoring and physical characterization of unsaturated zone transport; detection and characterization of mobile organic complexes of fission products; and electropolishing for surface decontamination of metals. 25 figures, 10 tables. (DLC)
Date: November 1, 1978
Creator: Platt, A.M. & Powell, J.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Nuclear waste management. Quarterly progress report, October--December 1977

Description: Work on the following is reported: decontamination and densification of chop-leach cladding residues, monitoring methods for particulate and gaseous effluents from waste solidification processes, TRU waste fixation studies, krypton solidification, /sup 14/C and /sup 129/I fixation, system studies, safety assessment, waste isolation safety assessment program, monitoring and physical characterization of unsaturated zone transport, detection and characterization of mobile organic complexes of fission, and electropolishing for surface decontamination of metals.
Date: May 1, 1978
Creator: Platt, A.M. (comp.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development of Ag/sup 0/Z for bulk /sup 129/I removal from nuclear fuel reprocessing plants and PbX for /sup 129/I storage

Description: Tests were conducted to develop Ag-exchanged mordenite (AgZ) for removal of gaseous /sup 129/I from nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. The effects of bed depth and hydrogen pretreatment on the elemental (I/sub 2/) iodine loading of AgZ were examined. The tests indicated that reduced AgZ (Ag/sup 0/Z) had about twice the capacity for iodine as AgZ, and at least 15-cm bed depths should be used for loading tests. The effects of H/sub 2/O(g), NO, NO/sub 2/, and bed temperature on the iodine loading of Ag/sup 0/Z were determined. The highest loadings were obtained with NO in the gas stream. Water vapor and bed temperature appeared to have no effect on the iodine loadings. Tests were conducted to develop a dry method for in situ regeneration of iodine-loaded Ag/sup 0/Z. A test bed of Ag/sup 0/Z was recycled 13 times by loading it with I/sub 2/ and stripping the I/sub 2/ (as HI) with H/sub 2/. A 20 percent loss in iodine capacity was observed by the fourteenth loading. The iodine loadings of lead-exchanged zeolites, which were used to chemisorb HI during the recycle tests, were measured. The iodine vapor pressures at 20/sup 0/C over the substrates were predicted to be 10/sup -6/, 10/sup -8/, and less than 10/sup -16/ atm for Pb-exchanged mordenite, Pb-exchanged faujasite and reduced Pb-exchanged faujasite, respectively. A process-flow diagram was formulated for iodine recovery. Two parallel beds of Ag/sup 0/Z are used to permit continuous iodine recovery. While one is being regenerated the other recovers iodine. The iodine is chemisorbed as AgI, stripped as HI, and chemisorbed on the lead bed as a form of PbI/sub 2/. The Ag beds were sized for a 30-day operation in a fuel reprocessing plant before regeneration. About 5 days would be needed for regeneration. About 2 m/sup 3/ of iodine-loaded ...
Date: January 1, 1978
Creator: Thomas, T.R.; Staples, B.A. & Murphy, L.P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development of process and storage materials suitable for krypton-85 waste management

Description: Screening tests for eight materials (4130 steel, 304 stainless steel, 316 stainless steel, 347 stainless steel, nitronic 50, A286, Monel 400, and Inconel 600) in high purity rubidium showed no liquid metal embrittlement for statically stressed, smooth ''C''-rings at temperatures between 400 and 672/sup 0/K. Potentially injurious localized corrosion in the form of pitting was observed for 304 stainless steel at 672/sup 0/K. All other materials showed good performance in the temperature range proposed for krypton-85 gas cylinder storage. Type 304 stainless steel showed significant general corrosion and intergranular attack in liquid rubidium of lower purity between 793 and 893/sup 0/K. Type 304 stainless steel is not recommended for hardware which may encounter similar service conditions.
Date: January 1, 1978
Creator: Pinchback, T.R. & Knecht, D.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Effects of waste management on the impact of fusion power

Description: Throughputs and inventories of radioactive materials that would have to be managed by a country whose primary form of electrical generation is fusion are estimated. Whole body dose rates for the entire population due to normal and off-normal incidents are calculated. For the case of equilibrium systems, two fusion cases are compared to an advanced fission power case. Comparisons are made for various stages of the fuel cycle and activated materials cycles. Fission reactor radiological impact is dominated by fuel reprocessing facility releases. These releases will decrease significantly if methods of containing /sup 85/Kr are implemented. Tritium releases during normal plant operations comprise most of the radiologic impact for both fusion cases. Total dose rates are estimated to be roughly two orders of magnitude lower for fusion than for fission reactors.
Date: January 1, 1978
Creator: Botts, T & Powell, J
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Extent of annealed or melted regions as a function of energy of pulsed laser irradiation

Description: The depth of melt front penetration induced by Q-switched ruby laser irradiation has been studied by electron microscopy for laser pulses of different duration and energy density in thermally diffused and ion implanted silicon. In thermally diffused specimens, dissolution of dislocation loops and precipitates by the laser radiation provides evidence for melting and the depth over which loops and precipitates are dissolved provides a measure of the melt front penetration depth. In ion implanted specimens, if the melt front does not exceed the thickness of the implanted layer, dislocation tangles and polycrystalline regions are observed after the laser irradiation. A complete annealing of displacement damage is achieved at an energy density (threshold) where the melt front penetrates beyond the damage layer.
Date: January 1, 1978
Creator: Narayan, J. & White, C.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Disposal of Iodine-129

Description: One of the problems to be solved in the nuclear waste management field is the disposal of radioactive iodine-129, which is one of the more volatile and long-lived fission products. Studies have shown that fission products can be fixed in concrete for permanent disposal. Current studies have demonstrated that practical cementitious grouts may contain up to 18% iodine as barium iodate. The waste disposal criterion is based on the fact that harmful effects to present or future generations can be avoided by isolation and/or dilution. Long-term isolation is effective in deep, dry repositories; however, since penetration by water is possible, although unlikely, release was calculated based on leach rates into water. Further considerations have indicated that sea disposal on or in the ocean floor may be a more acceptable alternative.
Date: January 1, 1978
Creator: Morgan, M.T.; Moore, J.G.; Devaney, H.E.; Rogers, G.C.; Williams, C. & Newman, E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

New isotopes of interest to explosive nucleosynthesis. [J,. pi. , preliminary results]

Description: A number of new isotopes in the iron region, both neutron-rich and proton-rich, have been produced at the Argonne FN tandem using heavy-ion beams. On the neutron-rich side, masses and beta-decay schemes were obtained, and the masses will be compared with various mass formulae used in nucleosynthesis calculations. Several heavy proton-rich N = Z odd-odd nuclei extending up from /sup 62/Ga were investigated with the aim of measuring the ft-values of their superallowed Fermi decays. The resulting ft-values will be compared with those found for the well studied lighter nuclei between /sup 14/O and /sup 54/Co. 11 references
Date: January 1, 1978
Creator: Davids, C.N.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Multiple electron loss cross sections for heavy ions incident on various atomic and molecular gases. [Differential and total cross sections, charge exchange, 20 MeV]

Description: Differential cross sections for charge change resulting from the scattering of 20 MeV /sup 127/I/sup 5 +/ and 20 MeV /sup 35/Cl/sup 4 +/ ions from thin gaseous targets were measured. Total cross sections for multiple electron loss were determined by integration of the differential charge state yields over angle. Cross sections will be presented for /sup 127/I/sup 5 +/ ions and /sup 35/Cl/sup 4 +/ ions on Xe, Ar, and N/sub 2/. Impact parameter analyses of charge fraction data were performed; these analyses depend on the assumed interatomic potential but not on any absolute measurements. The applicability of Bohr, Thomas--Fermi, and Lenz--Jensen potentials with the experimental total cross sections is shown. A different method, using a magnetic quadrupole to focus individual charge states, was used to measure absolute charge state yields of 20 MeV Fe ions emerging within a large acceptance angle from a differentially pumped gas cell of length 9.4 cm/sup 2/ N/sub 2/, Ar, Kr, Xe, and SF/sub 6/ targets were investigated. From the low pressure yields total cross sections for single and multiple electron loss were obtained using an improved version of the initial growth method. 18 references.
Date: January 1, 1978
Creator: Miller, P.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Heavy methane-SF/sub 6/ tracer test conducted at the Savannah River Plant, December 10, 1975

Description: Concern for man's impact on his environment requires an understanding of transport and dispersion of airborne pollutants on regional, continental, or global scales. Collection of experimental data in which the transport and diffusion processes can be isolated from source and sink factors is needed in order to help this understanding. A test performed at the Savannah River Plant on December 10, 1975, to obtain this kind of data was part of a DOE-supported program in cooperation with other laboratories and groups. The object of this test was to obtain data by using several tracers which are inert and non-depositing in order to isolate the effects of long-range transport and diffusion. The tracers used in this test are sulfur hexafluoride, methane-20 and -21 (as developed by the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory), and routine emissions of krypton-85. Considerable experience was gained in release, sampling, processing, and analysis of these tracers. Data from this test will allow the study of transport and dispersion of plumes to 100 km from a point source. Considerable data both on the ground and by aircraft at these distances were obtained. Collection of sulfur hexafluoride along with the two methane tracer systems were compared and a discrepancy between them was seen. The peak concentration and concentration summed over a sampling line show the methane to be low by about a factor of four relative to the sulfur hexafluoride. Sulfur hexafluoride appears to agree with the krypton-85 and mass balance calculations. Some explanations for the methane-sulfur hexafluoride discrepancy are given but no positive conclusion for this difference can be reched at this time. Conduct of the test and the data are described in this report.
Date: April 1, 1978
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Evaluation of concrete as a matrix for solidification of Savannah River Plant waste

Description: Some of the favorable and unfavorable characteristics of concrete as a matrix for solidification of SRP waste, as found in this study, are listed. Compressive strength and leachability of waste forms containing /sup 90/Sr and alpha emitters are very good. The waste forms have reasonable long-term thermal stability up to 400/sup 0/C, although water is evolved above 100/sup 0/C. Long-term radiation stability of the solid, as measured by strength and leachability, is excellent. For the unfavorable characteristics, methods are available to overcome any problems these properties might cause. /sup 137/Cs leachability can be reduced by additives such as zeolite. Steam generation can be reduced by an initial degassing step; however, radiolytic gassing may require further study. Set times can be retarded with additives. 10 figs.
Date: January 1, 1978
Creator: Stone, J.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Two and four nuclon transfer reactions induced by heavy ions. [Review]

Description: Two-nucleon-transfer reactions induced by heavy ions have been particularly successful in pointing out contributions of inelastic two-step processes. They provide a way to investigate the overlap between the wave functions of excited states of the target and residual nuclei. However, calculations of absolute cross sections must take into account sequential transfer. The studies of the (/sup 16/O,/sup 12/C) reaction on 1s--0d- and 0f--1p-shell nuclei are reviewed. The relative spectroscopic factors are in good agreement with those of the (/sup 6/Li,d) and (/sup 12/C,/sup 8/Be) reactions; hence, this reaction is evidently a good ..cap alpha..-transfer reaction. However, some puzzling results are still not understood: excitation of unnatural-parity states in s--d shell-nuclei, the failure of EFR-DWBA calculations in reproducing the angular correlation measurements. Several experimental results showing that the /sup 28/Si(/sup 18/O,/sup 14/C)/sup 32/S reaction is not a good ..cap alpha..-transfer reaction are presented. 11 figures, 4 tables.
Date: May 1, 1978
Creator: Mallet-Lemaire, M.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Model evaluation for travel distances 30 to 140 km. [Verification of transport models using /sup 85/Kr data at Savannah River Plant]

Description: The assessment of environmental effects from industrial pollution for travel distances over 50 km has been made largely without verification of the models used. Recently the Savannah River Laboratory, in cooperation with the Air Resources Laboratory of NOAA, has compiled a data base capable of providing this important verification. The data consists of (1) hourly release rates of /sup 85/Kr from 62 m stacks near the center of the Savannah River Plant (SRP), Aiken, SC; (2) turbulence quality meteorological data from seven 62 m towers at SRP and the 335 m WJBF-TV tower at Beech Island, SC, located 25 km from the center of the SRP; (3) National Weather Service surface and upper air observations including Bush Field Airport, Augusta, Ga., about 30 km from the center of SRP; (4) hourly estimates of the mixing depth obtained with an acoustic sounder located on the SRP; and (5) weekly and 10-hour averaged /sup 85/Kr air concentrations at 13 sites surrounding the SRP at distances ranging between 30 and 143 km. An earlier report has shown that annual averaged air concentrations for 1975 agree with observed values at the 13 sites within a factor of two (Pendergast, 1977). This report presents more detailed results based upon 10-hour averaged air concentrations. The models evaluated were variations of the stability wind-rose model and a segmented plume model. The meteorological models depend upon several key input variables: (1) stability category, (2) sigma/sub y/ and sigma/sub z/ curves, (3) wind velocity, and (4) mixing depth. Each of these key variables can be estimated by a variety of methods averaging processes. Several of the more commonly used methods for estimating the four key variables were evaluated using calculated and measured /sup 85/Kr air concentrations. Estimates of error were obtained for monthly and 10-hour sampling times.
Date: January 1, 1978
Creator: Pendergast, M.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Simple empirical method for determining the energy gap in nonspherical even--even nuclei

Description: It is shown that the energy gap in nonspherical even--even nuclei is rather sharply delineated in ..gamma..-ray spectra following average resonance neutron capture. The relation to other methods of determining the energy gap is also presented.
Date: January 1, 1978
Creator: Cizewski, J A; Casten, R F & Stelts, M L
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fast neutron capture cross sections of /sup 169/Tm, /sup 191/Ir, /sup 193/Ir, and /sup 175/Lu for 3 less than or equal to E/sub n/ less than or equal to 2000 keV

Description: Fast-neutron capture cross sections of /sup 169/Tm, /sup 191/Ir, /sup 193/Ir, and /sup 175/Lu are presented in tabular form for neutron energies between 3 and 2000 keV. 1 table.
Date: August 1, 1978
Creator: Macklin, R.L.; Drake, D.M. & Malanify, J.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department