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Post-Closure Inspection Report for Corrective Action Unit 453: Area 9 UXO Landfill Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, Calendar Year 2001

Description: Post-closure monitoring requirements for the Area 9 Unexploded Ordinance Landfill (Corrective Action Unit [CAU] 453) (Figure 1) are described in Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 453: Area 9 UXO Landfill, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, report number DOE/NV--284, August 1999. The Closure Report (CR) was submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) on August 5 , 1999. The CR (containing the Post-Closure Monitoring Plan) was approved by the NDEP on September 10,1999. As stated in Section 5.0 of the NDEP-approved CR, post-closure monitoring at CAU 453 consists of the following: (1) Visual site inspections are conducted twice a year to evaluate the condition of the cover. (2) Verification that the site is secure and the condition of the fence and posted warning signs. (3) Notice of any subsidence, erosion, unauthorized excavation, etc., deficiencies that may compromise the integrity of the unit. (4) Remedy of any deficiencies within 90 days of discovery. (5) Preparation and submittal of an annual report. Site inspections were conducted on May 15, 2001 and November 6, 2001. Both site inspections were conducted in accordance with the Post-Closure Monitoring Plan in the NDEP-approved CR. This report includes copies of the inspection checklists, photographs, recommendations, and conclusions. The Post-Closure Inspection Checklists are found in Attachment A, a copy of the field notes is found in Attachment B, and inspection photographs are found in Attachment C.
Date: January 1, 2002
Creator: Campbell, K. B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The War on Terrorism and What We Can Learn from our War with Fire

Description: The highly leveraged, asymmetric attacks of September 11th have launched the nation on a vast ''War on Terrorism''. Now that our vulnerabilities and the enemies' objectives and determination have been demonstrated, we find ourselves rapidly immersed in a huge, complex problem that is virtually devoid of true understanding while being swamped with resources and proposed technologies for solutions. How do we win this war? How do we make sure that we are making the proper investments? What things or freedoms or rights do we have to give up to win? Where do we even start? In analyzing this problem, many similarities to mankind's battle with uncontrolled fire and the threat it presented to society were noted. Major fires throughout history have destroyed whole cities and caused massive loss of life and property. Solutions were devised that have gradually, over several hundred years, reduced this threat to a level that allows us to co-exist with the threat of fire by applying constant vigilance and investments in fire protection, but without living in constant fear and dread from fire. We have created a multi-pronged approach to fire protection that involves both government and individuals in the prevention, mitigation, and response to fires. Fire protection has become a virtually unnoticed constant in our daily lives; we will have to do the same for terrorism. This paper discusses the history of fire protection and draws analogies to our War on Terrorism. We have, as a society, tackled and successfully conquered a problem as big as terrorism. From this battle, we can learn and take comfort.
Date: July 1, 2002
Creator: WHITLEY, JOHN B. & YONAS, GEROLD
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Summary of Large-and Small-Scale Unreinforced Masonry Test Program

Description: A five-year, large- and small-scale, static and dynamic experimental research program, in which more than 700 tests were conducted, has demonstrated that unreinforced masonry infills are more ductile and resist lateral loads more effectively than anticipated by conventional code procedures. The tests were conducted both in the laboratory and on existing structures at the Department of Energy's Y-12 National Security Complex. The experimental data indicate that the combination of a steel frame and infill material efficiently resists lateral loads--the infilling provides significant lateral stiffness while the surrounding frame adds ductility and confinement to the overall system. The results from approximately 25 moderate- and full-scale tests on infills showed that with simulated seismic loads, the frames confined the masonry, and the load-carrying capacity of the infill was considerably above the load that caused initial cracking. This finding was a significant departure from classical code approaches that assumed first cracking to be failure of an unreinforced masonry wall. The experimental program, performed for the US Department of Energy, consisted of the following large-scale tests on infills: in situ airbag pressure testing, shake-table tests, and the application of quasi-static in-plane and out-of-plane drift loads. This paper provides a summary of the overall experimental methodology and results.
Date: June 28, 2002
Creator: Fricke, K.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Post-Closure Inspection Report for Corrective Action Unit 424: Area 3 Landfill Complexes Tonopah Test Range, Nevada Calendar Year 2001

Description: Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 424, the Area 3 Landfill Complexes at Tonopah Test Range, consists of eight Corrective Action Sites (CASs), seven of which are landfill cells that were closed previously by capping. (The eighth CAS, A3-7, was not used as a landfill site and was closed without taking any corrective action.) Figure 1 shows the general location of the landfill cells. Figure 2 shows in more detail the location of the eight landfill cells. CAU 424 closure activities included removing small volumes of soil containing petroleum hydrocarbons, repairing cell covers that were cracked or had subsided, and installing above-grade and at-grade monuments marking the comers of the landfill cells. Post-closure monitoring requirements for CAU 424 are detailed in Section 5.0, Post-Closure Inspection Plan, contained in the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 424: Area 3 Landfill Complexes, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, report number DOE/NV--283, July 1999. The Closure Report (CR) was approved by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) in July 1999. The CR includes compaction and permeability results of soils that cap the seven landfill cells. As stated in Section 5.0 of the NDEP-approved CR, post-closure monitoring at CAU 424 consists of the following: (1) Site inspections conducted twice a year to evaluate the condition of the unit. (2) Verification that landfill markers and warning signs are in-place, intact, and readable. (3) Notice of any subsidence, erosion, unauthorized use, or deficiencies that may compromise the integrity of the landfill covers. (4) Remedy of any deficiencies within 90 days of discovery. (5) Preparation and submittal of an annual report. Site inspections were conducted on May 16, 2001, and November 6, 2001. The inspections were preformed after the NDEP approval of the CR. This report includes copies of the inspection checklist, photographs, recommendations, and conclusions. The Post-Closure Inspection Checklists ...
Date: February 1, 2002
Creator: Campbell, K. B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Homeland Security: Coast Guard Operations - Background and Issues for Congress

Description: This report discusses the Coast Guard's new homeland-security operations in the wake of the 9/11 attacks, which raise potential issues for Congress regarding the adequacy of Coast Guard assets and funding, the Coast Guard’s legal authorities, the Coast Guard’s location within the executive branch, and coordination between the Coast Guard and other agencies.
Date: February 19, 2002
Creator: O'Rourke, Ronald
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Homeland Security: Coast Guard Operations - Background and Issues for Congress

Description: This report discusses the Coast Guard's new homeland-security operations in the wake of the 9/11 attacks, which raise potential issues for Congress regarding the adequacy of Coast Guard assets and funding, the Coast Guard’s legal authorities, the Coast Guard’s location within the executive branch, and coordination between the Coast Guard and other agencies.
Date: February 19, 2002
Creator: O'Rourke, Ronald
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Department of Defense's Compliance with Statutory Requirements for Funding Military Operations Where Funds Were Not Provided in Advance

Description: Correspondence issued by the General Accounting Office with an abstract that begins "Section 127a, title 10 of the United States Code provides the Department of Defense (DOD) with two options for funding nontraining deployments and operations when Congress has not provided funds in advance. These options involve waiving reimbursements for support services and transferring amounts from other DOD accounts. Section 127a prescribes specific procedures to be followed by DOD when these funding options are used; requires DOD to notify Congress of and report on certain new contingency operations; and states that the Comptroller General of the United States shall from time to time, and when requested by a Committee of Congress, conduct a review to determine whether DOD is complying with the statutory requirements and limitations. GAO found that DOD has complied with the requirements contained in section 127a. Since the current notification and reporting requirements of section 127a were enacted in 1996, DOD has provided congressional notification for four operations, involving Bosnia, Kosovo, hurricane relief in Central America, and East Timor. DOD has rarely used the funding options provided in section 127a. It used the section 127a funding option allowing waiver of reimbursement for units providing support once, for Bosnia operations in fiscal year 1996, and has never used the option allowing transfer of funds. However, DOD has used other options to fund contingency operations, such as using funds that were planned to be spent later in a fiscal year and seeking supplemental appropriations."
Date: July 19, 2002
Creator: United States. General Accounting Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Military Personnel Strengths in the Army National Guard

Description: Correspondence issued by the General Accounting Office with an abstract that begins "The Army National Guard's funding requests for fiscal years 2000 and 2001 were overstated by $42.9 million and $31.6 million, respectively, because of inaccurate military strength and participation rates used to develop projected and actual military force levels. To correct these overstatements, the Guard is placing more emphasis on an existing personnel database reporting system that identifies the personnel assigned to a unit but who have not been paid for inactive duty training for three months or more. The Guard also improved the method it uses to calculate inactive duty training participation rates, now basing the rate on the number of people who have actually been paid for training, rather than on expected program costs."
Date: March 20, 2002
Creator: United States. General Accounting Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Defense Management: Need to Fully Recognize Ammunition Demilitarization Liability

Description: Correspondence issued by the General Accounting Office with an abstract that begins "Last year, GAO reported that the demilitarization liability for excess ammunition was not reflected in the Department of Defense's (DOD) financial statements although required by federal financial accounting standards. The Army, as the single manager for conventional ammunition, calculated a liability of $1.2 billion and prepared a voucher recognizing this amount. Although consistent with GAO's recommendation that DOD include the total liability for demilitarizing excess ammunition in its annual financial statements, this amount does not reflect the full extent of future costs. Specifically, the Army does not recognize a liability for costs associated with the demilitarization of (1) excess ammunition overseas or (2) excess Army-owned war reserve ammunition, excess retail ammunition, and excess ammunition not stored at an Army installation. GAO found that the total liability that should be reflected in fiscal year 2002 financial statements could amount to $3 billion, or $1.8 billion more than the Army's calculation. The Army needs to submit an additional voucher and include in its and DOD's fiscal year 2002 consolidated balance sheets the future liability associated with the demilitarization of excess Army ammunition at overseas and military storage locations."
Date: April 5, 2002
Creator: United States. General Accounting Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Air Force Aircraft: Preliminary Information on Air Force Tanker Leasing

Description: Correspondence issued by the General Accounting Office with an abstract that begins "GAO addressed the Air Force's plan to replace a portion of its KC-135 aerial refueling tanker fleet with leased Boeing 767 aircraft. Although the Air Force has a long term requirement to replace its aging fleet of KC-135 tankers, the urgency of the need in the short term is unclear. The Air Force stated that the leasing arrangement would allow it to acquire new tankers three years earlier than through its most recent procurement plan. This would allow the Air Force to retire old, less capable KC-135s, thus saving maintenance costs on those aircraft. Because the Air Force is still negotiating the lease details, it could not provide information on the cost effectiveness of leasing aircraft instead of purchasing them. Although GAO has not taken a position on the overall policy of leasing versus purchasing defense equipment, it found that, from a cost standpoint, leasing is more expensive in the long run. Because the 767 aircraft is larger than the KC-135, there will be some infrastructure improvement costs, such as for building or modifying hangars, taxiways, and runway aprons. Additional costs would likely include simulators and project management. The depots have undertaken some measures to speed up KC-135 maintenance and repair times; however, the extent to which these actions are helping or whether other measures could be taken is unknown."
Date: May 15, 2002
Creator: United States. General Accounting Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Defense Acquisition: DOD Faces Challenges in Implementing Best Practices

Description: A statement of record issued by the General Accounting Office with an abstract that begins "GAO studied several leading companies in the private sector that have made dramatic changes to their process for acquiring services. GAO found that these changes generally began with a corporate decision to pursue a more strategic approach to acquiring services--from developing a better picture of what the company was actually spending on services to developing new ways of doing business. The Defense Department (DOD), the government's largest purchaser of services, already has some elements in place that are essential to such a strategic approach, such as a commitment by top management to adopting best practices. However, DOD has yet to conduct a comprehensive analysis of its spending on services or thoroughly assess it's current structure, processes, and roles. DOD's size, the range and complexity of the services that it acquires, the capacity of its information and financial systems, and the unique requirements of the federal government are among the factors that DOD will need to consider as it tailors a strategic approach to its diverse needs."
Date: February 27, 2002
Creator: United States. General Accounting Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Defense Management: New Management Reform Program Still Evolving

Description: A briefing report issued by the General Accounting Office with an abstract that begins "The Secretary of Defense announced a new business transformation program in 2001 with the intent of improving the effectiveness and efficiency of Department of Defense business operations. Concerned that the previous administration's Defense Reform Initiatives (DRI) could not be successful without many years of sustained effort, the Senate Committee on Armed Services issued a September 2001 report directing GAO to assess which DRI initiatives have been carried forward. In completing this assessment, GAO also examined the management structure and types of initiatives contained in the new business transformation program. Also at the request of the Committee, more detailed information on the status of the logistics reform and electronic business/electronic commerce initiatives is provided in the GAO report. GAO interviewed officials involved with the former DRI initiatives, as well as officials operating at all levels of the new business transformation program. In commenting on a draft of this report, DOD concurred with GAO's findings."
Date: December 12, 2002
Creator: United States. General Accounting Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Issues in Implementing International Peace Operations

Description: Correspondence issued by the General Accounting Office with an abstract that begins "Between fiscal years 1996 and 2001, the United States provided $3.45 billion in direct contributions and $24.2 billion in voluntary or indirect contributions to 33 U.N. peacekeeping operations in such areas as the Congo, Sierra Leone, Kosovo, Bosnia, and, most recently, Afghanistan. The prospects for implementing peace agreements are enhanced if all major parties to the conflict participate in negotiating the agreements and if these agreements include specific authority and mechanisms for their enforcement. Peace operations are more likely to succeed if the military forces carrying out the operations have clear objectives, sufficient resources, and the authority to carry out their tasks. Military forces can help create a secure environment for civilian work to proceed. Moreover, the slow or late deployment of a peace operation's civil administrators might impede efforts to establish good governance. Finally, peace operations tend to be more successful when locals participate at every reasonable opportunity."
Date: May 24, 2002
Creator: United States. General Accounting Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

DOD User Fees: Implementation Status of Section 1085 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2001

Description: Correspondence issued by the General Accounting Office with an abstract that begins "Section 1085 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2001 authorized the military department secretaries to (1) charge fees to persons requesting information from the primary military archives and (2) retain collected fees to help defray costs associated with providing the information. The military archives also have authority under the User Charge Statute and the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) to charge for general information provided to the public. The Conference Report on the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2001 directs the Comptroller General to provide a report 1 year after implementation of the act on the fees collected and the associated costs of providing historical information. GAO found that Section 1085 authorizes but does not require action by the four primary military archives. Because of this, only the Army Military History Institute has implemented a fee schedule. Officials of the other three archives stated that the archives have no plans to implement a fee schedule under Section 1085. The Army Military History Institute first implemented a Section 1085 fee schedule in October 2001 and modified it in April 2002 to simplify some of the fees and increase mailing fees to foreign addresses. In a prior report, GAO recommended that the Department of Defense (DOD) update the FOIA and User Charge fee schedules, which had not been revised since 1986. DOD implemented a new fee schedule for FOIA requests on July 1, 2002. Regarding fees under the User Charge Statute, a draft revision to the DOD Financial Management Regulation is currently in the process of coordination."
Date: October 31, 2002
Creator: United States. General Accounting Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

VA and Defense Health Care: Progress Made, but DOD Continues To Face Military Medical Surveillance System Challenges

Description: A statement of record issued by the General Accounting Office with an abstract that begins "GAO, the Institute of Medicine, and others have cited weaknesses in the Defense Department's (DOD) medical surveillance during the Gulf War and Operation Joint Endeavor. DOD was unable to collect, maintain, and transfer accurate data on the movement of troops, potential exposures to health risks, and medical incidents during deployment in the Gulf war. DOD improved its medical surveillance system under Operation Joint Endeavor, providing useful information to military commanders and medical personnel. However, GAO found several problems with this system. For example, incomplete or inaccurate information related to service members' health and deployment status. DOD's has not established a single, comprehensive electronic system to document, archive, and access medical surveillance data. DOD has begun several initiatives to improve the reliability of deployment information and to enhance its information technology capabilities, but some initiatives are several years away from full implementation. Nonetheless, these efforts reflect a commitment by DOD to establish a comprehensive medical surveillance system. The ability of the Department of Veterans Affairs to fulfill its role in serving veterans and providing backup to DOD in times of war will be enhanced as DOD increases its medical surveillance capability."
Date: January 24, 2002
Creator: United States. General Accounting Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Cooperative Threat Reduction Program Annual Report

Description: Correspondence issued by the General Accounting Office with an abstract that begins "Section 1308 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2001 requires the Comptroller General to provide Congress with an assessment of the Department of Defense's annual report on the Cooperative Threat Reduction (CTR) program within 90 days of the submission of the annual report to Congress. The Department of Defense submitted its CTR annual report for Fiscal Year 2002 to Congress on September 3, 2002 almost 19 months after the submission date mandated by law. GAO found that the report (1) did not clearly set forth future funding data required by Congress, (2) did not include certain important planning elements, (3) in some instances asserted the use of a more rigorous methodology than was actually used, and (4) incorporated some but not all prior GAO recommendations."
Date: December 2, 2002
Creator: United States. General Accounting Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Defense Space Activities: Status of Reorganization

Description: Correspondence issued by the General Accounting Office with an abstract that begins "To meet long-standing concerns about the Department of Defense's (DOD) organization and management of national security space activities, Congress chartered the Commission to Assess United States National Security Space Management and Organization to study the organization and management of space activities that support U.S. national security interests and make recommendations for improvements. DOD has decided to take actions related to 10 of the commission's 13 recommendations. These include recommendations for organizational changes aimed at consolidating some activities, changing chains of command, opening lines of communications, and modifying policies to achieve greater responsibility and accountability. Many changes have been implemented within the last few months, and thus related processes and procedures have not been completed. As a result, it is too early to determine whether these changes will enable DOD to promote and protect U.S. interests in space more effectively. Moreover, DOD has not yet completed plans for achieving some long-range goals, such as developing a cadre of space professionals and integrating military and intelligence space activities. The Secretary of Defense chose not to implement three of the commission's recommendations and is instead (1) opting to establish a focal point for space within the Air Force rather than an under secretary of defense, (2) increasing the Air Force's responsibilities for space activities by department directive rather than requesting legislative change, and (3) directing existing organizations to conduct innovative space research and development rather than create a new organization."
Date: June 26, 2002
Creator: United States. General Accounting Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Anthrax Vaccine: GAO's Survey of Guard and Reserve Pilots and Aircrew

Description: A letter report issued by the General Accounting Office with an abstract that begins "GAO reviewed the views of pilots and aircrew members of the Air National Guard and Air Force Reserve regarding the Anthrax Vaccine Immunization Program (AVIP) of the Department of Defense (DOD). In December 1997, the Secretary of Defense announced a plan to inoculate U.S. forces against the potential battlefield use of anthrax as a biological warfare (BW) agent. In the context of the conventional battlefield, the nature and magnitude of the military BW threat has not changed materially since 1990 in terms of the number of countries suspected of developing BW capability, the types of BW agents they possess, or their ability to weaponize and deliver BW agents. In marked contrast to other mandatory DOD immunization requirements, GAO's sample survey in 2000 showed that AVIP was at that time adversely affecting the retention of trained and experienced guard and reserve pilots and aircrew members. Between September 1998 and September 2000, 16 percent of the pilots and aircrew members of the guard and reserve had (1) transferred to another unit (primarily to nonflying positions to avoid or delay receiving the anthrax shots), (2) moved to inactive status, or (3) left the military. Additionally, one in five of those still participating in or assigned to a unit in 2000 indicated their intention to leave in the near future. At the time of the survey, two-thirds of the guard and reserve pilots and aircrew members did not support DOD's mandatory AVIP or any future immunization programs planned for other BW agents. However, these negative views did not appear to indicate a general antivaccine bias. On the basis of the survey, GAO estimated that 37 percent of the guard and reserve pilots and aircrew members had received one or more ...
Date: September 20, 2002
Creator: United States. General Accounting Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Information Technology: Greater Use of Best Practices Can Reduce Risks in Acquiring Defense Health Care System

Description: A letter report issued by the General Accounting Office with an abstract that begins "This report examines the acquisition of the Composite Health Care System (CHCS) II. It is one in a series of reports reviewing the Department of Defense's use of best practices in acquiring information technology systems. CHCS II is expected to cost about $1 billion to deliver full capability to almost 1,100 health facilities worldwide by 2008. GAO's objectives were to determine (1) what progress has been made against project commitments, (2) whether the system has been economically justified, and (3) whether effective technical and management controls are in place."
Date: September 26, 2002
Creator: United States. General Accounting Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Defense Management: Munitions Requirements and Combatant Commanders' Needs Require Linkage

Description: A letter report issued by the General Accounting Office with an abstract that begins "The Department of Defense (DOD) planned to spend $7.9 billion on acquiring munitions in fiscal year 2002. Ongoing military operations associated with the global war on terrorism have heightened concerns about the unified combatant commands having sufficient quantities of munitions. Since 1994, the DOD Inspector General and GAO have issued numerous reports identifying weaknesses and expressing concerns about the accuracy of the process used by the department to determine munitions requirements. DOD has improved its munitions requirements process by eliminating most of the systematic problems--correcting questionable and inconsistently applied data, completing target templates, and resolving issues involving the level of detail that should be included in planning guidance. However, a fundamental problem remains unaddressed--inadequate linkage between the near-term munitions needs of the combatant commands and the purchases made by the military services based on computations derived from the department's munitions requirement determination process. The department's munitions requirements process provides varied answers for current munitions acquisitions questions because of the aforementioned disjunction. As a result, the services, in the short term, are purchasing some critically needed munitions based on available funding and contractors' production capacity. Although this approach may be necessary in the short term, it raises questions as to whether over the long term it would position the services to make the most efficient use of appropriated funds and whether the needs of combatant commands to carry out their missions will be met."
Date: October 15, 2002
Creator: United States. General Accounting Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Best Practices: Taking a Strategic Approach Could Improve DOD's Acquisition of Services

Description: A letter report issued by the General Accounting Office with an abstract that begins "GAO studied several leading companies in the private sector that have made dramatic changes to their process for acquiring services. GAO found that these changes generally began with a corporate decision to pursue a more strategic approach to acquiring services--from developing a better picture of what the company was actually spending on services to developing new ways of doing business. The Defense Department (DOD), the government's largest purchaser of services, already has some elements in place that are essential to such a strategic approach, such as a commitment by top management to adopting best practices. However, DOD has yet to conduct a comprehensive analysis of its spending on services or thoroughly assess it's current structure, processes, and roles. DOD's size, the range and complexity of the services that it acquires, the capacity of its information and financial systems, and the unique requirements of the federal government are among the factors that DOD will need to consider as it tailors a strategic approach to its diverse needs."
Date: January 18, 2002
Creator: United States. General Accounting Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

DOD Overseas Schools: Compensation Adequate for Recruiting and Retaining Well-Qualified Teachers

Description: A letter report issued by the General Accounting Office with an abstract that begins "The Department of Defense (DOD) overseas schools educate more than 70,000 children of military service members and DOD civilian employees throughout the world. In order to ensure the continued success of this school system, the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2002 directed GAO to assess whether the DOD overseas teachers' compensation package is adequate to recruit and retain qualified teachers. The act also required GAO to determine whether any revisions to the law governing DOD overseas teachers' salaries were advisable."
Date: December 12, 2002
Creator: United States. General Accounting Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Defense Budget: Need to Strengthen Guidance and Oversight of Contingency Operation Costs

Description: A letter report issued by the General Accounting Office with an abstract that begins "The incremental costs for overseas military contingency operations, which include the enforcement of no-fly zones, humanitarian assistance, and peace enforcement, totaled more than $29 billion since 1991. Most of these costs were incurred in the Balkans and Southwest Asia. The Department of Defense (DOD) defines incremental costs as those above and beyond baseline training, operations, and personnel costs. Although most contingency operations expenditures GAO reviewed were appropriate, as much as $101 million was spent on questionable items, including cappuccino machines, golf memberships, and decorator furniture. Limited guidance and oversight, combined with a lack of cost consciousness, contributed to the questionable expenditures."
Date: May 21, 2002
Creator: United States. General Accounting Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Defense Inventory: Better Reporting on Spare Parts Spending Will Enhance Congressional Oversight

Description: A letter report issued by the General Accounting Office with an abstract that begins "GAO was asked by the Department of Defense (DOD) to identify ways to improve DOD's availability of high-quality spare parts for aircraft, ships, vehicles, and weapons systems. DOD's recent reports do not provide an accurate and complete picture of spare parts funding as required by financial management regulation. As a result, the reports do not provide Congress with reasonable assurance about the amount of funds being spent on spare parts. Furthermore, the reports are of limited use to Congress as it makes decisions on how best to spend resources to reduce spare parts shortages and improve military readiness."
Date: October 24, 2002
Creator: United States. General Accounting Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department