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The acid precipitation provisions of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments and minorities` energy consumption

Description: In November 1990 Congress passed a comprehensive set of amendments to the Clean Air Act of 1977 with potentially very high compliance costs. The provisions pertaining to control of acid precipitation have been specified with sufficient detail to examine their cost impacts. These provisions will require investment in emissions control technology, mainly by electric utilities. Production costs will increase due to the required investment, resulting in higher electricity prices. This paper examines the possible magnitude of these effects and whether there might be differential impacts on racial/ethnic minority groups. Differential impacts were considered a possibility because of the differences in the percentage of total income spent on energy by various population subgroups. In 1989, the Majority group (defined as non-Black, non-Hispanic) spent about three percent of household income on energy, while Blacks spent double that, six percent, and Hispanics spent about four percent. (The differences in income underlying these figures are greater, however, than the differences in energy expenditures). To address these issues, we compare projected electricity consumption and expenditures and total energy expenditures for Black, Hispanic, and Majority households. The distribution of benefits from reducing acid precipitation is not addressed since the possible effects on ambient air quality in specific geographical areas that are directly attributable to reducing utilities` sulfur dioxide emissions are highly uncertain.
Date: December 31, 1991
Creator: Nieves, L. A. & Wernette, D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Affordable housing: Reducing the energy cost burden

Description: Residential energy expenditures are a key determinant of housing affordability, particularly for lower Income households. For years, federal, state and local governments and agencies have sought to defray energy expenses and Increase residential energy efficiency for low Income households through legislative and regulatory actions and programs. Nevertheless, household energy costs continue to place a major burden on lower Income families. This issue paper was written to help formulate national energy policy by providing the United States Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EE) with Information to help define the affordable housing issue; Identify major drivers, key factors, and primary stakeholders shaping the affordable housing issue; and review how responding to this Issue may impact EE`s goals and objectives and Influence the strategic direction of the office. Typically, housing affordability is an Issue associated with lower income households. This issue paper adopts this perspective, but it is important to note that reducing energy utility costs can make {open_quotes}better{close_quote} housing affordable to any household regardless of income. As energy efficiency is improved throughout all sectors of the economy, special consideration must be given to low income households. Of all households, low income households are burdened the most by residential energy costs; their residences often are the least energy-efficient and have the greatest potential for efficiency improvements, but the occupants have the fewest resources to dedicate to conservation measures. This paper begins with a definition of {open_quotes}affordability{close_quotes} as it pertains to total housing costs and summarizes several key statistics related to housing affordability and energy use by lower income households.
Date: January 1, 1995
Creator: Lee, A. D.; Chin, R. I. & Marden, C. L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Monthly energy review, April 1994

Description: The Monthly Energy Review contains statistical data on the following: energy consumption, petroleum, natural gas, oil and gas resource development, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, energy prices, and international energy. In addition, an energy overview is provided, and, for the April issue, Energy use and carbon emissions; Some international comparisons.
Date: April 1, 1994
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Looking past the first year: Do the savings last?. A study of the persistence of energy savings in low-income Wisconsin residences, final report

Description: Wisconsin Energy Conservation Corporation (WECC) conducted a Study of the Persistence of Energy Savings in Low-Income Wisconsin Residences for the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Existing Buildings Efficiency Program. The study assessed the persistence of energy savings resulting from participation in the Wisconsin Utility Weatherization Assistance Program (UWAP). The study assessed the impact of weatherization and heating system measures up to eight years after the installation of energy conservation measures (ECMS) in low-income, gas-heated residences, the majority of which are 1- and 2-unit buildings. Primary data for the study came from two utilities, Wisconsin Gas Company and Madison Gas & Electric Company. Both utilities provided WECC with their weatherization program databases, which contained participant information back to 1982. WECC also obtained fuel consumption information for the program participants from each utility. The consumption histories spanned a 6-year period from March 1985 through May 1991 for Wisconsin Gas Company participants, and a 5-year period from October 1986 through August 1991 for Madison Gas & Electric Company participants. After attrition, the study included 5,129 customers from the Wisconsin Gas Company program and 1,553 customers from the Madison Gas & Electric Company program.
Date: September 1, 1992
Creator: Narum, D.; Pigg, S. & Schlegel, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Energy implications of glass-container recycling

Description: This report addresses the question of whether glass-container recycling actually saves energy. Glass-container production in 1991 was 10{sup 7} tons, with cullet making up about 30% of the input to manufacture. Two-thirds of the cullet is postconsumer waste; the remainder is in-house scrap (rejects). Most of the glass recycled is made into new containers. Total primary energy consumption includes direct process-energy use by the industry (adjusted to account for the efficiency of fuel production) plus fuel and raw-material transportation and production energies; the grand total for 1991 is estimated to be about 168 {times} 10{sup 12} Btu. The total primary energy use decreases as the percent of glass recycled rises, but the maximum energy saved is only about 13%. If distance to the landfill is kept fixed and that to the recovery facility multiplied by about eight, to 100 mi, a break-even point is reached, and recycling saves no energy. Previous work has shown that to save energy when using glass bottles, reuse is the clear choice. Recycling of glass does not save much energy or valuable raw material and does not reduce air or water pollution significantly. The most important impacts are the small reduction of waste sent to the landfill and increased production rates at glass plants.
Date: March 1, 1994
Creator: Gaines, L. L. & Mintz, M. M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Replacement Energy Cost Analysis Package (RECAP): User`s guide. Revision 1

Description: A microcomputer program called the Replacement Energy Cost Analysis Package (RECAP) has been developed to assist the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in determining the replacement energy costs associated with short-term shutdowns or deratings of one or more nuclear reactors. The calculations are based on the seasonal, unit-specific cost estimates for 1993--1996 previously published in NRC Report NUREG/CR--4012, Vol. 3 (1992), for all 112 US reactors. Because the RECAP program is menu-driven, the user can define specific case studies in terms of such parameters as the units to be included, the length and timing of the shutdown or derating period, the unit capacity factors, and the reference year for reporting cost results. In addition to simultaneous shutdown cases, more complicated situations, such as overlapping shutdown periods or shutdowns that occur in different years, can be examined through the use of a present-worth calculation option.
Date: July 1, 1994
Creator: VanKuiken, J. C. & Willing, D. L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Impact evaluation of an adjustable speed drive installed at Ball-InCon Glass Packaging Corporation under the Energy $avings Plan

Description: This impact evaluation of an adjustable speed drive that was recently installed at Ball-InCon Glass Packaging Corporation (Ball-InCon) was conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) as part of an evaluation of its Energy $avings Plan (E$P) Program. The Program makes acquisition payments to firms that install energy conservation projects in their industrial processes. The objective of this impact evaluation was to assess how much electrical energy is being saved at Ball-InCon as a result of the E$P and to determine how much the savings cost Bonneville and the region. The impact of the project was evaluated with a combination of engineering analysis, financial analysis, interviews, and submittal reviews (Ball-InCon`s Abstract, Proposal, and Completion Report). The project consists of switching from inlet guide vanes to adjustable frequency drives for 10 motors that provide cooling air to glass container molds. Based on this impact evaluation, energy savings from this project are expected to be 1,711,500 kWh/yr, or about 0.20 average megawatts. On a per-ton basis, this project will save approximately 7.8 kWh/ton of glass produced. The project cost $182,834 to install, and Ball-InCon received payment of $95,581 from Bonneville for the acquisition of energy savings. The real levelized cost of these energy savings to Bonneville is 5.2 mills/kWh over the projects`s assumed 15-year life, and the levelized cost to the region is 10.7 mills/kWh in 1992 dollars, not including transmission and distribution effects. This project would not have been implemented without the acquisition payment from Bonneville, so all of the energy savings can be attributed to the E$P.
Date: May 1, 1993
Creator: Spanner, G. E. & Sullivan, G. P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Minority energy assessment report. Fall 1992

Description: The purpose of this research is to project household energy consumption, energy expenditure, and energy expenditure as share of income for five population groups from 1991 to 2009. The approach uses the Minority Energy Assessment Model (MEAM), developed by Argonne National Laboratory for the US Department of Energy`s Office of Minority Economic Impact. The MEAM provides a framework that can be used to forecast regional energy consumption and energy expenditure for majority, black, Hispanic, poor, and nonpoor households. The forecasts of key macroeconomic and energy variables used as exogenous variables in the MEAM were obtained from the Data Resources, Inc., Macromodel and Energy Model. Generally, the projections of household energy consumption, expenditure, and energy expenditure as share of income vary across population groups and census regions.
Date: December 1, 1992
Creator: Teotia, A. P. S.; Poyer, D. A.; Lampley, L. & Anderson, J. L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The federal energy policy: An example of its potential impact on energy consumption and expenditures in minority and poor households

Description: This report presents an analysis of the relative impacts of the National Energy Strategy on majority and minority households and on nonpoor and poor households. (Minority households are defined as those headed by black or Hispanic persons; poor households are defined as those having combined household income less than or equal to 125% of the Office of Management and Budget`s poverty-income threshold.) Energy consumption and expenditures, and projected energy expenditures as a share of income, for the period 1987 to 2009 are reported. Projected consumptions of electricity and nonelectric energy over this period are also reported for each group. An analysis of how these projected values are affected under different housing growth scenarios is performed. The analysis in this report presents a preliminary set of projections generated under a set of simplifying assumptions. Future analysis will rigorously assess the sensitivity of the projected values to various changes in a number of these assumptions.
Date: September 1, 1991
Creator: Poyer, D. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Toward a national plan for the commercialization of solar energy: price/demand scenarios and projections of solar utilization under the National Energy Act

Description: Three macroeconomic scenarios were developed as an economic backdrop for projecting solar technology market acceptance under various government policies and commercialization programs. These scenarios assume three levels of future world oil prices - $18, $25 and $32 per barrel (1976 $) in the year 2000. This range is intended to encompass the most likely set of energy futures. The scenarios are discussed in terms of their underlying assumptions and changes in fuel and resource consumption by sector of the economy. Estimates of the future utilization of solar technologies for the mid-price scenarios are given. These estimates are based on the solar subsidies and incentive programs in the National Energy Act.
Date: May 1, 1979
Creator: Rebibo, K. K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Clean Cities Case Study: UPS delivers with Alternative Fuels

Description: In the fall of 1994, the UPS fleet in Landover, Maryland, began operating 20 vehicles on CNG. UPS selected CNG because natural gas is an abundant domestic resource that is available in almost every city in the US, and it also generally costs less than other fuels. The UPS project, funded by DOE through NREL and managed by TRI, was designed to test the feasibility of using CNG in a medium-duty pick-up and delivery fleet. This study is intended only to illustrate approaches that organizations could use in adopting AFVs into their fleets.
Date: August 30, 1999
Creator: Frailey, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

First regional super ESPC a success on Kodiak Island, Alaska

Description: The Coast Guard military base on Kodiak Island, Alaska, is the largest Coast Guard base in the world. By taking a leadership role in a pilot program to streamline Federal financing and procurement for energy saving projects, the Coast Guard is saving more than $220,000 a year in energy costs at this base. Using the Super ESPC (Energy Savings Performance Contracting) program, the Coast Guard was able to quickly contract with an experienced contractor with energy savings expertise. Working with ERI, one of FEMP's (Federal Energy Management Program) approved energy services contractors, the Coast Guard determined areas of potential energy savings and designed a retrofit to upgrade inefficient equipment and infrastructure. When energy-efficient modifications are complete, the base will be 30% more cost effective.
Date: December 23, 2000
Creator: Epstein, K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

FEMP program overview

Description: The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), part of the U.S. Department of Energy, helps agencies reduce their costs, increase energy efficiency, use renewable energy, and conserve water.
Date: July 1, 1999
Creator: Epstein, K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Annual Energy Outlook 1999: with Projections to 2020

Description: The Annual Energy Outlook 1999 (AEO99) presents midterm forecasts of energy supply, demand, and prices through 2020 prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The projections are based on results from EIA`s National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). The report begins with an Overview summarizing the AEO99 reference case. The next section, Legislation and Regulations, describes the assumptions made with regard to laws that affect energy markets and discusses evolving legislative and regulatory issues. Issues in Focus discusses current energy issues--the economic decline in East Asia, growth in demand for natural gas, vehicle emissions standards, competitive electricity pricing, renewable portfolio standards, and carbon emissions. It is followed by the analysis of energy market trends. The analysis in AEO99 focuses primarily on a reference case and four other cases that assume higher and lower economic growth and higher and lower world oil prices than in the reference case. Forecast tables for these cases are provided in Appendixes A through C. Appendixes D and E present a summary of the reference case forecasts in units of oil equivalence and household energy expenditures. The AEO99 projections are based on Federal, State, and local laws and regulations in effect on July 1, 1998. Pending legislation and sections of existing legislation for which funds have not been appropriated are not reflected in the forecasts. Historical data used for the AEOI99 projections were the most current available as of July 31, 1998, when most 1997 data but only partial 1998 data were available.
Date: December 1998
Creator: United States. Energy Information Administration.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Improved framing and ductwork lower energy costs, McStain Enterprises - Longmont, CO: Building America Project summary fact sheet

Description: McStain Enterprises' new cottage-style homes built under the U.S. Department of Energy's Building America program are designed to greatly reduce energy costs and improve indoor air quality for their customers in Longmont, Colorado. In addition, energy-efficient features in the homes provide owners with greater durability and value, allow some buyers to qualify for special energy-efficient mortgages, and can result in higher resale values. Features include improved building envelope and air distribution systems, high-efficiency heating and cooling systems, improved indoor air quality, and Green Builder concepts from Colorado's Green Builder Program.
Date: March 17, 2000
Creator: Hendron, B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Energy efficiency in municipal wastewater treatment plants: Technology assessment

Description: The New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) estimates that municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in New York State consume about 1.5 billion kWh of electricity each year for sewage treatment and sludge management based on the predominant types of treatment plants, the results of an energy use survey, and recent trends in the amounts of electricity WWTPs use nationwide. Electric utilities in New York State have encouraged demand-side management (DSM) to help control or lower energy costs and make energy available for new customers without constructing additional facilities. This report describes DSM opportunities for WWTPs in New York State; discusses the costs and benefits of several DSM measures; projects energy impact statewide of the DSM technologies; identifies the barrier to implementing DSM at WWTPs; and outlines one possible incentive that could stimulate widespread adoption of DSM by WWTP operators. The DSM technologies discussed are outfall hydropower, on-site generation, aeration efficiency, time-of-day electricity pricing, and storing wastewater.
Date: November 1, 1995
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The impact of energy prices on technology choice in the United States steel industry

Description: In the last thirty years US steel producers have replaced their aging open hearth steel furnaces with basic oxygen or large electric arc furnaces. This choice of technology leads to the opportunity to substitute electricity for fossil fuels as a heat source. We extend earlier research to investigate whether or not energy prices affect this type of technology adoption as predicted by economic theory. The econometric model uses the seemingly unrelated Tobit'' method to capture the effects of the industry's experience with both technologies, technical change, and potential cost reductions, as well as energy prices, on adoption. When we include the prices of electricity and coking coal as explanatory variables, the four energy price coefficients have the signs predicted by the law of demand. The two price coefficients have a statistically significant effect on adoption of basic oxygen furnaces. The inclusion of energy prices leads to significantly more efficient estimates of other coefficients in the model. 19 refs., 3 tabs.
Date: January 1, 1991
Creator: Karlson, S.H. (Northern Illinois Univ., De Kalb, IL (United States). Dept. of Economics) & Boyd, G. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States))
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Measured energy savings and economics of retrofitting existing single-family homes: An update of the BECA-B database

Description: The energy bill for US single-family households was over $77 billion in 1987 (excluding auto fuel purchases), accounting for approximately 20% of national energy expenditures. Large sums are spent on residential retrofits by individual homeowners, government agencies, and utilities. As of late 1987, over 21 million households indicated that they had added at least one energy-saving measure in the previous two years, while a recent Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) study estimated that nearly 15 million residential customers have participated in some kind of demand-side management (DSM) program. Given the level of continuing investments in residential energy efficiency, accurate estimates of savings from various conservation measures are increasingly necessary, especially as new technologies become more sophisticated and incremental efficiency gains more difficult to achieve. This report provides a comparative analysis of measured data on the performance and cost-effectiveness of energy-saving measures in existing single-family homes, based on information in the Buildings Energy-Use Compilation and Analysis (BECA) data base. The initial BECA report on measured data for single-family retrofits was completed seven years ago. In updating the single-family database, we have added 135 data points, representing over 33,000 houses, to the original database of 145 retrofit projects. The report is organized in two volumes. Volume 1 provides a summary of energy savings and costs of individual retrofit measures and strategies and results from federal/state low-income and utility weatherization programs. we also discuss measurement issues, predicted versus actual savings, trends in single-family retrofit programs, and implications for the next generation'' of cost-effective single-family retrofits. Volume 2 contains a written summary of each retrofit project and complete data tables. 87 refs., 20 figs., 16 tabs.
Date: February 1, 1991
Creator: Cohen, S.D.; Goldman, C.A. & Harris, J.P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The acid precipitation provisions of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments and minorities' energy consumption

Description: In November 1990 Congress passed a comprehensive set of amendments to the Clean Air Act of 1977 with potentially very high compliance costs. The provisions pertaining to control of acid precipitation have been specified with sufficient detail to examine their cost impacts. These provisions will require investment in emissions control technology, mainly by electric utilities. Production costs will increase due to the required investment, resulting in higher electricity prices. This paper examines the possible magnitude of these effects and whether there might be differential impacts on racial/ethnic minority groups. Differential impacts were considered a possibility because of the differences in the percentage of total income spent on energy by various population subgroups. In 1989, the Majority group (defined as non-Black, non-Hispanic) spent about three percent of household income on energy, while Blacks spent double that, six percent, and Hispanics spent about four percent. (The differences in income underlying these figures are greater, however, than the differences in energy expenditures). To address these issues, we compare projected electricity consumption and expenditures and total energy expenditures for Black, Hispanic, and Majority households. The distribution of benefits from reducing acid precipitation is not addressed since the possible effects on ambient air quality in specific geographical areas that are directly attributable to reducing utilities' sulfur dioxide emissions are highly uncertain.
Date: January 1, 1991
Creator: Nieves, L.A. & Wernette, D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

An analysis of residential energy consumption and expenditures by minority households by home type and housing vintage

Description: In this paper a descriptive analysis of the relationship between energy consumption, patterns of energy use, and housing stock variables is presented. The purpose of the analysis is to uncover evidence of variations in energy consumption and expenditures, and patterns of energy use between majority households (defines as households with neither a black nor Hispanic head of household), black households (defined as households with a black head of household), and Hispanic households (defined as households with a Hispanic head of household) between 1980 (time of the first DOE/EIA Residential Energy Consumption Survey, 1982a) and 1987 (time of the last DOE/EIA Residential Energy Consumption Survey, 1989a). The analysis is three-dimensional: energy consumption and expenditures are presented by time (1980 to 1987), housing vintage, and housing type. A comparative analysis of changes in energy variables for the three population groups -- majority, black, and Hispanic -- within and between specific housing stock categories is presented.
Date: January 1, 1992
Creator: Poyer, D.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Case studies of the potential effects of carbon taxation on the stone, clay, and glass industry

Description: This case study focuses on the potential for a carbon tax ($25 and $100 per metric ton of carbon) to reduce energy use and associated carbon dioxide (CO[sub 2]) emissions in three subsectors of the stone, clay, and glass industry: hydraulic cement, glass and glass products, and other products. A conservation supply curve analysis found that (1) opportunities for reducing fossil fuel use in the subsectors are limited (15% reduction under $100 tax) and (2) the relationship between the tax and reduced CO[sub 2] emissions is nonlinear and diminishing. Because cement manufacturing produces a significant amount of CO[sub 2], this subsector was analyzed. A plant-level analysis found more opportunities to mitigate CO[sub 2] emissions; under a $100 tax, fossil fuel use would decrease 52%. (A conservative estimate lies between 15% and 52%). It also confirmed the nonlinear relationship, suggesting significant benefits could result from small taxes (32% reduction under $25 tax). A fuel share analysis found the cement industry could reduce carbon loading 11% under a $100 tax if gas were substituted for coal. Under a $100 tax, cement demand would decrease 17% and its price would increase 32%, a substantial increase for a material commodity. Overall, CO[sub 2] emissions from cement manufacturing would decrease 24--33% under a $100 tax and 10--18% under a $25 tax. Much of the decrease would result from the reduced demand for cement.
Date: December 1, 1992
Creator: Bock, M.J.; Boyd, G.A. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment and Information Sciences Div.); Rosenbaum, D.I. (Nebraska Univ., Lincoln, NE (United States). Dept. of Economics) & Ross, M.H. (Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Physics)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fast correlation method for passive-solar design

Description: A passive-solar design manual for single-family detached residences and dormitory-type buildings is being developed. The design procedure employed in the manual is a simplification of the original monthly solar load ratio (SLR) method. The new SLR correlations involve a single constant for each system. The correlation constant appears as a scale factor permitting the use of a universal performance curve for all passive systems. Furthermore, by providing location-dependent correlations between the annual solar heating fraction (SHF) and the minimum monthly SHF, we have eliminated the need to perform an SLR calculation for each month of the heating season.
Date: January 1, 1982
Creator: Wray, W.O.; Biehl, F.A. & Kosiewicz, C.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Program evaluation: Weatherization Residential Assistance Partnership (WRAP) Program. Volume 1, Final report

Description: The Connecticut low income weatherization program was developed in response to a 1987 rate docket order from the Connecticut Department of Public Utility Control (DPUC) to Connecticut Light & Power Co., an operating subsidiary of Northeast Utilities (NU). (Throughout this report, NU is referred to as the operator of the program.) This program, known as the Weatherization Residential Assistance Partnership, or WRAP, was configured utilizing input from a collaborative group of interested parties to the docket. It was agreed that this program would be put forth by the electric utility, but would not ignore oil and gas savings (thus, it was to be ``fuel- blind``). The allocated cost of conservation services for each fuel source, however, should be cost effective. It was to be offered to those utility customers at or below 200 percent of the federal poverty levels, and provide a wide array of energy saving measures directed toward heating, water heating and lighting. It was felt by the collaborative group that this program would raise the level of expenditures per participant for weatherization services provided by the state, and by linking to and revising the auditing process for weatherization, would lower the audit unit cost. The program plans ranged from the offering of low-cost heating, water heating and infiltration measures, increased insulation levels, carpentry and plumbing services, to furnace or burner replacement. The program was configured to allow for very comprehensive weatherization and heating system servicing.
Date: December 1, 1991
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Process evaluation: Weatherization Residential Assistance Partnership (WRAP Program). [Final report]

Description: The ``Weatherization Residential Assistance Partnership,`` or WRAP program, is a fuel-blind conservation program designed to assist Northeast Utilities` low-income customers to use energy safely and efficiently. Innovative with respect to its collaborative approach and its focus on utilizing and strengthening the existing low-income weatherization service delivery network, and WRAP program offers an interesting model to other utilities which traditionally have relied on for-profit energy service contractors and highly centralized program implementation structures. This report presents the findings of a process evaluation and WRAP customer survey conducted by the Technical Development Corporation (TDC). TDC`s work is one part of a multi-part evaluation project being conducted under the management of ICF Resources, Inc.
Date: October 1, 1990
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department