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Post Waterflood CO2 Miscible Flood in Light Oil, Fluvial-Dominated Deltaic Reservoir (Pre-Work and Project Proposal), Class I

Description: This project outlines a proposal to improve the recovery of light oil from waterflooded fluvial dominated deltaic (FDD) reservoir through a miscible carbon dioxide (CO2) flood. The site is the Port Neches Field in Orange County, Texas. The field is well explored and well exploited. The project area is 270 acres within the Port Neches Field.
Date: February 5, 2002
Creator: Bou-Mikael, Sami
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Post Waterflood CO2 Miscible Flood in Light Oil, Fluvial-Dominated Deltaic Reservoir (Pre-Work and Project Proposal - Appendix)

Description: The main objective of the Port Neches Project was to determine the feasibility and producibility of CO2 miscible flooding techniques enhanced with horizontal drilling applied to a Fluvial Dominated Deltaic reservoir. The second was to disseminate the knowledge gained through established Technology Transfer mechanisms to support DOE's programmatic objectives of increasing domestic oil production and reducing abandonment of oil fields.
Date: February 5, 2002
Creator: Bou-Mikael, Sami
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

DIFFERENTIAL SOIL IMPEDANCE OBSTACLE DETECTION

Description: This project develops a new and unique obstacle detection sensor for horizontal directional drilling (HDD) equipment. The development of this new technology will greatly improve the reliability and safety of natural gas HDD construction practices. This sensor utilizes a differential soil impedance measurement technique that will be sensitive to the presence of plastic and ceramic, as well as metallic obstacles. The use of HDD equipment has risen significantly in the gas industry because HDD provides a much more cost-effective and less disruptive method for gas pipe installation than older, trenching methods. However, there have been isolated strikes of underground utilities by HDD equipment, which may have been avoided if methods were available to detect other underground obstacles when using HDD systems. GTI advisors from the gas industry have ranked the value of solving the obstacle detection problem as the most important research and development project for GTI to pursue using Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) funds available through its industry partner, GRI. GTI proposes to develop a prototype down-hole sensor system that is simple and compact. The sensor utilizes an impedance measurement technique that is sensitive to the presence of metallic or nonmetallic objects in the proximity of the HDD head. The system will use a thin film sensor conformal with the drill head. The impedance of the soil will be measured with a low frequency signal injected through the drill head itself. A pair of bridge type impedance sensors, mounted orthogonal to one another, is capacitively coupled to the soil. Inclusions in the soil will cause changes to the sensor balance distinguishable from homogeneous soil. The sensor will provide range and direction data for obstacles near the HDD head. The goal is to provide a simple, robust system that provides the information required to avoid obstacles. This must be ...
Date: April 1, 2003
Creator: Kieba, Maximillian J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Technology assessment of vertical and horizontal air drilling potential in the United States. Final report

Description: The objective of the research was to assess the potential for vertical, directional and horizontal air drilling in the United States and to evaluate the current technology used in air drilling. To accomplish the task, the continental United States was divided into drilling regions and provinces. The map in Appendix A shows the divisions. Air drilling data were accumulated for as many provinces as possible. The data were used to define the potential problems associated with air drilling, to determine the limitations of air drilling and to analyze the relative economics of drilling with air versus drilling mud. While gathering the drilling data, operators, drilling contractors, air drilling contractors, and service companies were contacted. Their opinion as to the advantages and limitations of air drilling were discussed. Each was specifically asked if they thought air drilling could be expanded within the continental United States and where that expansion could take place. The well data were collected and placed in a data base. Over 165 records were collected. Once in the data base, the information was analyzed to determine the economics of air drilling and to determine the limiting factors associated with air drilling.
Date: August 18, 1993
Creator: Carden, R. S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Development through High-Resolution 3C3D Seismic and Horizontal Drilling: Eva South Marrow Sand Unit, Texas County, Oklahoma

Description: The Eva South Morrow Sand Unit is located in western Texas County, Oklahoma. The field produces from an upper Morrow sandstone, termed the Eva sandstone, deposited in a transgressive valley-fill sequence. The field is defined as a combination structural stratigraphic trap; the reservoir lies in a convex up -dip bend in the valley and is truncated on the west side by the Teepee Creek fault. Although the field has been a successful waterflood since 1993, reservoir heterogeneity and compartmentalization has impeded overall sweep efficiency. A 4.25 square mile high-resolution, three component three-dimensional (3C3D) seismic survey was acquired in order to improve reservoir characterization and pinpoint the optimal location of a new horizontal producing well, the ESU 13-H.
Date: March 11, 2002
Creator: Wheeler,David M.; Miller, William A. & Wilson, Travis C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Integrated analysis of production potential and profitability of a horizontal well in the Lower Glen Rose Formation, Maverick County, Texas

Description: The U.S. Department of Energy/Morgantown Energy Technology Center (DOE/METC) awarded a contract in 1991 to Prime Energy Corporation (PEC) to demonstrate the benefit of using horizontal wells to recover gas from low permeability formations. The project area was located in the Chittim field of Maverick County, Texas. The Lower Glen Rose Formation in the Chittim field was a promising horizontal well candidate based on the heterogenous nature of the reservoir (suggested by large well-to-well variances in reserves) and the low percentage of economical vertical wells. Since there was substantial evidence of reservoir heterogeneity, it was unknown whether the selected, wellsite would penetrate a reservoir with the desired properties for a horizontal well. Thus, an integrated team was formed to combine geologic analysis, seismic interpretation, reservoir engineering, reservoir simulation, and economic assessment to analyze the production potential and profitability of completing a horizontal well in the Lower Glen Rose formation.
Date: March 1, 1995
Creator: Ammer, J.R.; Mroz, T.H.; Zammerilli, A.M.; Yost, A.B. II; Muncey, J.G. & Hegeman, P.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Integrated approach towards the application of horizontal wells to improve waterflooding performance. [Quarterly] report, January 1--March 31, 1993

Description: The overall purpose of the proposed project is to improve secondary recovery performance of a marginal oil field through the use of a horizontal injection well. The location and direction of the well will be selected based on the detailed reservoir description using integrated approach. We expect that 2 to 5 % of original oil in place will be recovered using this method. This should extend the life of the reservoir by at least 10 years. To accomplish the goals of the project, it is divided into two stages. In Stage 1, we will select part of the Glenn Pool field, and collect additional reservoir data by conducting cross bore hole tomography surveys and formation microscanner logs through newly drilled well. In addition, we will also utilize analogous outcrop data. By combining the state of the art data with conventional core and log data, we will develop a detailed reservoir description based on integrated approach. After conducting extensive reservoir simulation studies, we will select a location and direction of a horizontal injection well. The well will be drilled based on optimized design, and the field performance will be monitored for at least six months. If the performance is encouraging, we will enter into second budget period of the project. If continued, the second budget period of the project will involve selection of part of the same reservoir, development of reservoir description using only conventional data, simulation of flow performance using developed reservoir description, selection of a location and direction of a horizontal injection well, and implementation of the well followed by monitoring of reservoir performance. During this quarter, the technical progress is limited due to contractual problems associated with signing of the contracts with the subcontractors. Once all the contracts are signed, the project will pick up the speed and ...
Date: June 1, 1993
Creator: Kelkar, B. G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Horizontal drilling in shallow reservoirs

Description: The objectives of this joint horizontal drilling effort by the US DOE and Belden & Blake in the complex, low permeability Clinton Sandstone will focus on the following objectives: (1) apply horizontal drilling technology in hard, abrasive, and tight Clinton Sandstone; (2) evaluate effects of multiple hydraulic fracturing in a low permeability horizontal wellbore; (3) assess economic viability of horizontal drilling in the Clinton and similar tight gas sands.
Date: June 1, 1992
Creator: Murray, W. F. Jr.; Schrider, L. A.; Haynes, C. D. & Mazza, R. L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Simulation studies to evaluate the effect of fracture closure on the performance of naturally fractured reservoirs. Annual report

Description: The second year of this three-year research program to evaluate the effect of fracture closure on the recovery of oil and gas from naturally fractured reservoirs has been completed. The overall objectives of the study are to: (1) evaluate the reservoir conditions where fracture closure is significant, and (2) evaluate innovative fluid injection techniques capable of maintaining pressure within the reservoir. Simulation studies have been conducted with a dual porosity simulator capable of simulating the performance of vertical and horizontal wells. Each simulation model has been initialized with properties typical of the Austin Chalk reservoir in Pearsall Field, Texas. During year one, simulations of both vertical and horizontal well performance were made assuming that fracture permeability was insensitive to pressure charge. The results confirmed that horizontal wells could increase both rate of oil recovery and total oil recovery from naturally fractured reservoirs. During the second year the performances of the same vertical and horizontal wells were evaluated with the assumption that fracture permeability was a function of reservoir pressure. This required repetition of most of the natural depletion cases simulated in year one while invoking the pressure-sensitive fracture permeability option. To investigate sensitivity to in situ stress, two stress conditions were simulated for each primary variable. The water injection cases, begun in year one, were extended to include most of the reservoir parameters investigated for natural depletion, including fracture permeability as a function of net stress and the use of horizontal wells. The results thus far confirm that pressure-sensitive fractures degrade well performance and that the degradation is reduced by water injection pressure maintenance. Furthermore, oil recovery can be significantly increased by water injection pressure maintenance.
Date: November 1, 1992
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Productivity and injectivity of horizontal wells. Quarterly report, April 1, 1994--June 30, 1994

Description: In the fifth quarter of this project, progress was made concerning four of the stated objectives of the project. First, extensive sensitivity studies, based on reservoir simulation, have been performed on a field example to assess the effects of wellbore friction, inflow, skin, length, and diameter of the well, etc. on the productivity of a horizontal well. Secondly, the authors have launched a new phase of the project on developing models for scale-up and coarse grid pseudo functions for horizontal wells in heterogeneous reservoirs. The available methods have been applied to an example problem and their performance and limitations have been analyzed. Thirdly, the authors are in the process of developing a new analytical solution for the coning and cresting critical rates for horizontal wells. Finally, experimental data bases will be used to test the authors` newly developed general mechanistic model for two-phase flow.
Date: September 1, 1994
Creator: Fayers, F. J.; Aziz, K. & Hewett, T. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Directional Drilling and Equipment for Hot Granite Wells

Description: Directional drilling technology was extended and modified to drill the first well of a subsurface geothermal energy extraction system at the Fenton Hill, New Mexico, hot dry rock (HDR) experimental site. Borehole geometries, extremely hard and abrasive granite rock, and high formation temperatures combined to provide a challenging environment for directional drilling tools and instrumentation. Completing the first of the two-wellbore HDR system resulted in the definition of operation limitations of -many conventional directional drilling tools, instrumentation, and techniques. The successful completion of the first wellbore, Energy Extraction Well No. 2 (EE-21), to a measured depth of 4.7 km (15,300 ft) in granite reservoir rock with a bottomhole temperature of 320 C (610 F) required the development of a new high-temperature downhole motor and modification of existing wireline-conveyed steering tool systems. Conventional rotary-driven directional assemblies were successfully modified to accommodate the very hard and abrasive rock encountered while drilling nearly 2.6 km (8,500 ft) of directional hole to a final inclination of 35{sup o} from the vertical at the controlled azimuthal orientation. Data were collected to optimize the drilling procedures far the programmed directional drilling of well EE-3 parallel to, and 370 metres (1,200 ft) above, Drilling equipment and techniques used in drilling wellbores for extraction of geothermal energy from hot granite were generally similar to those that are standard and common to hydrocarbon drilling practices. However, it was necessary to design some new equipment for this program: some equipment was modified especially for this program and some was operated beyond normal ratings. These tools and procedures met with various degrees of success. Two types of shock subs were developed and tested during this project. However, downhole time was limited, and formations were so varied that analysis of the capabilities of these items is not conclusive. Temperature limits of the ...
Date: January 1, 1981
Creator: Williams, R. E.; Neudecker, J. W.; Rowley, J.C. & Brittenham, T. L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Use of Cutting-Edge Horizontal and Underbalanced Drilling Technologies and Subsurface Seismic Techniques to Explore, Drill and Produce Reservoired Oil and Gas from the Fractured Monterey Below 10,000 ft in the Santa Maria Basin of California

Description: This project was undertaken to demonstrate that oil and gas can be drilled and produced safely and economically from a fractured Monterey reservoir in the Santa Maria Basin of California by employing horizontal wellbores and underbalanced drilling technologies. Two vertical wells were previously drilled in this area with heavy mud and conventional completions; neither was commercially productive. A new well was drilled by the project team in 2004 with the objective of accessing an extended length of oil-bearing, high-resistivity Monterey shale via a horizontal wellbore, while implementing managed-pressure drilling (MPD) techniques to avoid formation damage. Initial project meetings were conducted in October 2003. The team confirmed that the demonstration well would be completed open-hole to minimize productivity impairment. Following an overview of the geologic setting and local field experience, critical aspects of the application were identified. At the pre-spud meeting in January 2004, the final well design was confirmed and the well programming/service company requirements assigned. Various design elements were reduced in scope due to significant budgetary constraints. Major alterations to the original plan included: (1) a VSP seismic survey was delayed to a later phase; (2) a new (larger) surface hole would be drilled rather than re-enter an existing well; (3) a 7-in. liner would be placed into the top of the Monterey target as quickly as possible to avoid problems with hole stability; (4) evaluation activities were reduced in scope; (5) geosteering observations for fracture access would be deduced from penetration rate, cuttings description and hydrocarbon in-flow; and (6) rather than use nitrogen, a novel air-injection MPD system was to be implemented. Drilling operations, delayed from the original schedule by capital constraints and lack of rig availability, were conducted from September 12 to November 11, 2004. The vertical and upper curved sections were drilled and lined through the ...
Date: September 29, 2005
Creator: Witter, George; Knoll, Robert; Rehm, William & Williams, Thomas
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Productivity and injectivity of horizontal wells. Quarterly report, April 1--June 30, 1996

Description: A number of activities have been carried out during this quarter of research. A list outlining these efforts is presented including: (1) The design and planning of the next phase of the two-phase flow experiments have moved forward. The necessary modifications to allow the use of wire-wrapped screens have been made. The flow loop and the data acquisition system are currently being tested and the new experiments are about to commence. (2) Work on obtaining exact well models for a horizontal well or a well of any general profile has continued. (3) Work on the application of horizontal wells in gas condensate reservoirs has progressed. The available methods and models are being critically evaluated with the aid of simulation runs. (4) Research work on developing coarse grid methods to study cresting in horizontal wells has continued. Correlations for optimum grid size, breakthrough time, and post breakthrough behavior (i.e. water-oil ratio) are being developed and tested for the problem of water cresting. (5) The Ph.D. project on three-dimensional flexible grid simulator (FLEX) was successfully defended in June. The FLEX simulator will be used in future studies as well as in future developments. The dissertation report will be submitted soon to the US DOE. This quarterly report is based on the last activity listed above. It shows the advantage of the new flexible grid simulator.
Date: August 1, 1996
Creator: Aziz, K. & Hewett, T.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Productivity and injectivity of horizontal wells. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1, 1995--December 31, 1995

Description: As the length of a horizontal well is increased, its contact with the reservoir increases. But at the same time, the resistance to the flow in the well also increases which has a direct negative effect on the productivity of the well. The overall performance of horizontal wells depends on the balance of these two opposing factors. No reliable tools are currently available that account for both these factors in the evaluation of horizontal well performance. An analytical well-model is developed which can quantify the effects of pressure loss in the well on the overall well performance. A sensitivity study is conducted on the effect of various reservoir, fluid and well parameters on well performance.
Date: February 1, 1996
Creator: Aziz, K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

In situ construction of horizontal soil containment barrier at Fernald

Description: An innovative method of placing soil barriers to contain vertical flow is being prepared for demonstration by the Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corporation (FERMCO), working in conjunction with the Department of Energy Office of Technology Development (DOE/OTD) and two principle subcontractors. The method employs proven directional drilling techniques, jet grouting technology and unique placement tooling to form horizontal soil barriers in situ. This is done without disturbance to existing land disposed wastes. This paper is a summary report on the current state of that demonstration, including: a discussion of the construction methods, the results of the initial tool tests, an overview of the Fernald site conditions and, the resulting path of tooling development for the second phase of tool testing.
Date: April 1, 1995
Creator: Ridenour, D.; Pettit, P.J. & Walker, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

ECONOMIC RECOVERY OF OIL TRAPPED AT FAN MARGINS USING HIGH ANGLE WELLS AND MULTIPLE HYDRAULIC FRACTURES

Description: This project attempts to demonstrate the effectiveness of exploiting thin-layered, low-energy deposits at the distal margin of a prograding turbidite complex through the use of hydraulically fractured horizontal or high-angle wells. The combination of a horizontal or high-angle well and hydraulic fracturing will allow greater pay exposure than can be achieved with conventional vertical wells while maintaining vertical communication between thin interbedded layers and the wellbore. A high-angle well will be drilled in the fan-margin portion of a slope-basin clastic reservoir and will be completed with multiple hydraulic-fracture treatments. Geologic modeling, reservoir characterization, and fine-grid reservoir simulation will be used to select the well location and orientation. Design parameters for the hydraulic-fracture treatments will be determined, in part, by fracturing an existing test well. Fracture azimuth will be predicted by passive seismic monitoring of a fracture-stimulation treatment in the test well using logging tools in an offset well.
Date: November 6, 1998
Creator: Laue, Mike L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Economic recovery of oil trapped at fan margins using high-angle wells and multiple hydraulic fractures. [Quarterly report], January 1--March 31, 1996

Description: This project attempts to demonstrate the effectiveness of exploiting thin, layered, low-energy, deposits at the distal margin of a prograding turbidite complex through use of fractured horizontal or high-angle wells. The combination of hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling will allow greater pay exposure than conventional vertical wells while maintaining vertical communication between thin interbedded layers and the wellbore. A high-angle well will be drilled in the fan margin portion of a slope-basin clastic reservoir and will be completed with multiple hydraulic fracture treatments. Geologic modeling, reservoir characterization, and fine-grid reservoir simulation will be used to select the well location and orientation. Design parameters for hydraulic fracture treatments will be determined by fracturing an existing test well. Fracture azimuth will be predicted, in part, by passive seismic monitoring from an offset well during fracture stimulation of the test wellbore. An existing vertical well in the Yowlumne Field, Kern Co., California was hydraulically fractured. Microseismic and pressure data collected from this work are being used to predict fracture geometry and azimuth for future treatments in the proposed high-angle well. A detailed reservoir characterization of the field demonstration site is complete. This work include interpretation of a 3-D seismic survey, analysis of all available well logs, description of three whole cores, petrographic analysis of thin sections and incorporation of pressure and production data. A partial-field fine-grid model base on the reservoir characterization has been constructed and initialized. Efforts to history match the model to actual production and pressure data are underway.
Date: April 29, 1996
Creator: Niemeyer, B.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Summary of air permeability data from single-hole injection tests in unsaturated fractured tuffs at the Apache Leap Research Site: Results of steady-state test interpretation

Description: This document summarizes air permeability estimates obtained from single hole pneumatic injection tests in unsaturated fractured tuffs at the Covered Borehole Site (CBS) within the larger apache Leap Research Site (ALRS). Only permeability estimates obtained from a steady state interpretation of relatively stable pressure and flow rate data are included. Tests were conducted in five boreholes inclined at 45{degree} to the horizontal, and one vertical borehole. Over 180 borehole segments were tested by setting the packers 1 m apart. Additional tests were conducted in segments of lengths 0.5, 2.0, and 3.0 m in one borehole, and 2.0 m in another borehole, bringing the total number of tests to over 270. Tests were conducted by maintaining a constant injection rate until air pressure became relatively stable and remained so for some time. The injection rate was then incremented by a constant value and the procedure repeated. The air injection rate, pressure, temperature, and relative humidity were recorded. For each relatively stable period of injection rate and pressure, air permeability was estimated by treating the rock around each test interval as a uniform, isotropic porous medium within which air flows as a single phase under steady state, in a pressure field exhibiting prolate spheroidal symmetry. For each permeability estimate the authors list the corresponding injection rate, pressure, temperature and relative humidity. They also present selected graphs which show how the latter quantities vary with time; logarithmic plots of pressure versus time which demonstrate the importance of borehole storage effects during the early transient portion of each incremental test period; and semilogarithmic plots of pressure versus recovery time at the end of each test sequence.
Date: March 1, 1996
Creator: Guzman, A.G.; Geddis, A.M.; Henrich, M.J.; Lohrstorfer, C.F. & Neuman, S.P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Anisotropy and spatial variation of relative permeability and lithologic character of Tensleep Sandstone reservoirs in the Bighorn and Wind River Basins, Wyoming. Annual report, October 1, 1994-- September 30, 1995

Description: This research is to provide improved strategies for enhanced oil recovery from the Tensleep Sandstone oil reservoirs in the Bighorn and Wind River basins, Wyoming. Because of the great range of API gravities of the oils produced from these reservoirs, the proposed study concentrates on understanding the spatial variation and anisotropy of relative permeability within the Tensleep Sandstone. This research will associate those spatial distributions and anisotropies with the depositional subfacies and zones of diagenetic alteration found within the sandstone. The associations of the above with pore geometry will link relative permeability with the dimensions of lithofacies and authigenic mineral facies. Hence, the study is to provide criteria for scaling this parameter on a range of scales, from the laboratory to the basin-wide scale of subfacies distribution. Effects of depositional processes and burial diagenesis will be investigated. Image analysis of pore systems will be done to produce algorithms for estimating relative permeability from petrographic analyses of core and well cuttings. In addition, these studies are being coupled with geochemical modeling and coreflood experiments to investigate the potential for wellbore scaling and formation damage anticipated during EOR, eg., CO{sub 2} flooding. This will provide a regional basis for EOR strategies for the largest potential target reservoir in Wyoming; results will have application to all eolian reservoirs through correlations of relative permeability variation and anisotropy with eolian depositional lithofacies.
Date: March 1, 1996
Creator: Dunn, T.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Activity plan: Directional drilling and environmental measurements while drilling

Description: This activity plan describes the testing of directional drilling combined with environmental measurements while drilling at two Hanford Site locations. A cold test is to be conducted at the 105A Mock Tank Leak Facility in the 200 East Area. A hot test is proposed to be run at the 216-B-8 tile field north of the 241-B Tank Farm in 200 East Area. Criteria to judge the success, partial success or failure of various aspects of the test are included. The TWRS program is assessing the potential for use of directional drilling because of an identified need to interrogate the vadose zone beneath the single-shell tanks. Because every precaution must be taken to assure that investigation activities do not violate the integrity of the tanks, control of the drill bit and ability to follow a predetermined drill path are of utmost importance and are being tested.
Date: July 16, 1998
Creator: Myers, D.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

DOE NN-20 microboreholes project. Final project report

Description: Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and its contractors have developed a conceptual design for a directional microborehole drilling system for hard-rock boring. Analytical calculations, simulations, and the results of laboratory testing of critical prototype drilling components have influenced the design. Two reduced-size drilling systems to produce small diameter, 500-ft-long, directionally drilled river crossing trajectories are proposed to prove feasibility of the concept: (1) a 2-1/4-in. diameter, early demonstration unit to drill directional ultraslimholes; and (2) a 1-1/8-in. diameter, ultimate design to drill directional microboreholes. Both concepts use versatile, coiled-tubing-deployed, hydraulically-powered drilling assemblies, and a surface platform that includes a tubing injector unit to develop high load insertion (snubbing) of the tubing into the sealed borehole. Surface injection will be used to develop the required bit thrust, and both concepts provide for the use of a commercial, real-time, location and steering system that is readily and routinely adapted for deployment on a coiled-tubing drilling platform. The conceptual drilling platform and its subassemblies are shown.
Date: March 12, 1997
Creator: Dreesen, D.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Post waterflood CO{sub 2} miscible flood in light oil, fluvial-dominated deltaic reservoir. FY 1993 annual report

Description: The project is a Class 1 DOE-sponsored field demonstration project of a CO{sub 2} miscible flood project at the Port Neches Field in Orange County, Texas. The project will determine the recovery efficiency of CO{sub 2} flooding a waterflooded and a partial waterdrive sandstone reservoir at a depth of 5,800. The project will also evaluate the use of a horizontal CO{sub 2} injection well placed at the original oil-water contact of the waterflooded reservoir. A PC-based reservoir screening model will be developed by Texaco`s research lab in Houston and Louisiana State University will assist in the development of a database of fluvial-dominated deltaic reservoirs where CO{sub 2} flooding may be applicable. This technology will be transferred throughout the oil industry through a series of technical papers and industry open forums.
Date: March 1, 1995
Creator: Davis, D.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Improved recovery demonstration for Williston Basin carbonates. Quarterly technical progress report, October--December 1996

Description: The purpose of this project is to demonstrate targeted infill and extension drilling opportunities, better determinations of oil-in-place, methods for improved completion efficiency and the suitability of waterflooding in certain shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Williston Basin, Montana, North Dakota and South Dakota. Improved reservoir characterization utilizing 3-dimensional (3D) and multi-component seismic are being investigated for identification of structural and stratigraphic reservoir compartments. These seismic characterization tools are integrated with geological and engineering studies. Improved completion efficiency is being tested with short-lateral and horizontal drilling technologies. Improved completion efficiency, additional wells at closer spacing and better estimates of oil-in-place will result in additional oil production by primary and enhanced recovery processes.
Date: April 1, 1997
Creator: Sippel, M.A. & Carrell, L.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Improved recovery demonstration for Williston Basin carbonates. Quarterly report, July 1 - September 30, 1996

Description: The purpose of this project is to demonstrate targeted infill and extension drilling opportunities, better determinations of oil-in- place, methods for improved completion efficiency and the suitability of waterflooding in certain shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Williston Basin, Montana, North Dakota and South Dakota. Improved reservoir characterization utilizing 3-dimensional (3D) and multi-component seismic are being investigated for identification of structural and stratigraphic reservoir compartments. Field demonstrations are in progress to collect data for evaluation of horizontal completions in both the Red River and Ratcliffe. A vertical well in the Red River will test attribute analysis of 3D seismic data for prediction of porosity development. Additional seismic acquisitions and interpretation are in progress for both the Ratcliffe and Red River. A water-injectivity test in a new horizontal completion in the Red Rive B zone at Buffalo Field is scheduled for next quarter.
Date: December 31, 1996
Creator: Carrell, L.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department