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Making Woodlands Profitable in the Southern States

Description: Report discussing farm forestry in the southern United States, which "concerns the farmer chiefly as a matter of dollars and cents. Farm forestry may be said to be the handling of forest trees and woodlands in such a manner as to increase the income and the permanent value of the farm." -- p. 3. Topics discussed include marketing timber, protecting woodlands, and making empty spaces profitable.
Date: 1920
Creator: Mattoon, Wilbur R. (Wilbur Reed), 1875-1941
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Making Woodlands Profitable in the Southern States

Description: Revised Edition. Report discussing farm forestry in the southern United States, which "concerns the farmer chiefly as a matter of dollars and cents. Farm forestry may be said to be the handling of forest trees and woodlands in such a manner as to increase the income and the permanent value of the farm." -- p. 3. Topics discussed include marketing timber, protecting woodlands, and making empty spaces profitable.
Date: 1922
Creator: Mattoon, Wilbur R. (Wilbur Reed), 1875-1941
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Making Woodlands Profitable in the Southern States

Description: Revised Edition. Report discussing farm forestry in the southern United States, which "concerns the farmer chiefly as a matter of dollars and cents. Farm forestry may be said to be the handling of forest trees and woodlands in such a manner as to increase the income and the permanent value of the farm." -- p. 1. Topics discussed include marketing timber, protecting woodlands, and making empty spaces profitable.
Date: 1926
Creator: Mattoon, Wilbur R. (Wilbur Reed), 1875-1941
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Making Woodlands Profitable in the Southern States

Description: Revised Edition. Report discussing farm forestry in the southern United States, which "concerns the farmer chiefly as a matter of dollars and cents. Farm forestry may be said to be the handling of forest trees and woodlands in such a manner as to increase the income and the permanent value of the farm." -- p. 1. Topics discussed include marketing timber, protecting woodlands, and making empty spaces profitable.
Date: 1932
Creator: Mattoon, Wilbur R. (Wilbur Reed), 1875-1941
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Termination Report

Description: The results of this project include: (1) Development of econometrically estimated marginal abatement and associated production curves describing response of agricultural and forestry emissions/sink/offsets enhancements for use in integrated assessments. Curves were developed that reflected agricultural, and forestry production of traditional commodities, carbon and other greenhouse gas offsets and biofuels given signals of general commodity demand, and carbon and energy prices. (2) Integration of the non-dynamic curves from (1) into a version of the PNNL SGM integrated assessment model was done in cooperation with Dr. Ronald Sands at PNNL. The results were reported at the second DOE conference on sequestration in the paper listed and the abstract is in Annex B of this report. (3) Alternative agricultural sequestration estimates were developed in conjunction with personnel at Colorado State University using CENTURY and analyses can operate under the use of agricultural soil carbon data from either the EPIC or CENTURY models. (4) A major effort was devoted to understanding the possible role and applicable actions from agriculture. (5) Work was done with EPA and EIA to update the biofuel data and assumptions resulting in some now emerging results showing the criticality of biofuel assumptions.
Date: January 7, 2004
Creator: Dhazngilly, Bruce McCarl and
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Interplay between Climate Change, Forests, and Disturbances

Description: Climate change affects forests both directly and indirectly through disturbances. Disturbances are a natural and integral part of forest ecosystems, and climate change can alter these natural interactions. When disturbances exceed their natural range of variation, the change in forest structure and function may be extreme. Each disturbance affects forests differently. Some disturbances have tight interactions with the species and forest communities which can be disrupted by climate change. Impacts of disturbances and thus of climate change are seen over a broad spectrum of spatial and temporal scales. Future observations, research, and tool development are needed to further understand the interactions between climate change and forest disturbances.
Date: March 25, 2000
Creator: Dale, Virginia H.; Joyce, Linda A.; McNulty, Steve & Neilson, Ronald P.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Urban Trees as Sinks for Soot: Deposition of Atmospheric Elemental Carbon to Oak Canopies and Litterfall Flux to Soil

Description: Elemental carbon (EC), a product of incomplete combustion of fossil fuels and biomass, contributes to climate warming and poor air quality. In urban areas, diesel fuel trucks are the main source of EC emissions from mobile sources. After emission, EC is deposited to receptor surfaces via two main pathways: precipitation (wet deposition) and directly as particles (dry deposition). Urban trees may play an important role in removing EC from the atmosphere by intercepting and delivering it directly to the soil. The goal of this research was to quantify the magnitude of EC retention in leaf waxes (in-wax EC) and EC fluxes to the soil via leaf litterfall in the City of Denton, Texas. Denton is a rapidly growing urban location in the Dallas-Fort Worth metropolitan area. A foliar extraction technique was used to determine EC retention in leaf waxes. Foliar samples were collected monthly, from April through July, from pairs of Quercus stellata (post oak, n=10) and Quercus virginiana (live oak, n = 10) trees. Samples were rinsed with water and chloroform in a two-step process to determine EC retained in leaf waxes. A Sunset OC/EC aerosol analyzer was utilized to analyze the EC content of extracts filtered onto quartz-fiber filters. From April through July, leaf litter was collected bi-weekly under 35 trees (20 post oak, 15 live oak), and oven dried to determine dry weight. EC retained by tree canopies was estimated by multiplying in-wax EC by canopy leaf area index, while EC flux to soil was estimated by multiplying in-wax EC by leaf litterfall mass. This study shows that through retention of EC in leaf waxes, urban tree canopies represent important short-term sinks for soot in urban areas.
Date: May 2018
Creator: Rindy, Jenna
Partner: UNT Libraries

Prevent Tanbark Deterioration.

Description: Presents methods for obtaining, curing, and marketing tanbark for use in leather tanning. Discusses ways to prevent loss of tannin from deterioration of the bark.
Date: August 1950
Creator: Fowler, Marvin E. (Marvin Edward), 1904-
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Planting Southern Pines.

Description: Describes different types of southern pines, how to plant stock, and maintaining the trees as they continue to grow.
Date: June 1938
Creator: Wakeley, Philip C. (Philip Carman), 1902-
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Farm buildings from home-grown timber in the South.

Description: Discusses the use of timber from farm-owned woodlands for lumber manufacture. Suggests the use of home-grown timber to solve the problem of poor rural housing by using it and other native materials to improve farm buildings, and as a means to create cash income. Describes successful community programs in various southern states including Texas.
Date: September 1945
Creator: Williams, W. K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Growing black locust trees.

Description: Discusses the practice of growing black locust trees for profit in the timber industry as a method of erosion control and soil building. Provides suggestions for watering, weeding, insect and disease control, and marketing of seedlings.
Date: January 1941
Creator: United States. Department of Agriculture.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Ecological Enhancement of Timber Growth: Applying Compost to Loblolly Pine Plantations

Description: This study explored the application of compost onto a small loblolly pine tree forest in northeast Texas. Its purpose was to determine if the application of various amounts of compost would provide for accelerated rates of growth for the trees. Soil parameters were also monitored. A total of 270 trees were planted and studied in a northeast Texas forest ecosystem. Compost rates of 5, 25, and 50 tons per acre with either soil or compost backfill were utilized and compared to a control without compost. Nonparametric and parametric ANOVA and Chi-Square tests were utilized. The results indicated that greater application rates retained greater moisture and higher pH levels in the soil. Compost applications also yielded a greater survival rate as well as larger tree height and diameter when compared to the control. The 25 ton/acre application backfilled in native soil achieved the greatest average in height and diameter when compared to the averages for the control plot. Greater growth differences for the 25S application can be attributed to additional nutrients coupled with a stable pH consistent with native soil acidity.
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Date: December 1999
Creator: Stuckey, Harold Troy
Partner: UNT Libraries

Measuring and Monitoring Carbon in the Agricultural and Forestry Sectors

Description: Proposals to reduce emissions of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases often include the use of forestry and agricultural practices and lands for carbon sequestration. However, uncertainty about the accuracy of measuring carbon from these activities has led some to question this potential. Basic approaches for measuring forest and agricultural carbon include on-site measurement; indirect measurement from off-site tools; and estimation using models or inferences. Because of challenges associated with balancing the cost and accuracy of these measurement tools, any practicable system for measuring forest and agricultural carbon might require a mix of these approaches.
Date: October 6, 2008
Creator: Gorte, Ross W. & Johnson, Renée
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Application of Low-Cost Digital Elevation Models to Detect Change in Forest Carbon Sequestration Projects

Description: This two-year study evaluated advanced multispectral digital imagery applications for assessment of forest carbon stock change. A series of bench and field studies in North Carolina and Ohio tested aerial assessments of forest change between two time periods using two software packages (ERDAS and TERREST) for Digital Elevation Model (DEM) creation, automated classification software (eCognition) for canopy segmentation and a multiple ranging laser designed to improve quality of elevation data. Results of the DEM software comparison showed that while TERREST has the potential to produce much higher resolution DEM than ERDAS, it is unable to resolve crucial canopy features adequately. Lab tests demonstrated that additional laser data improves image registration and Z-axis DEM quality. Data collected in the field revealed difficult challenges in correctly modeling the location of laser strike and subsequently determining elevations in both software packages. Automated software segmentation of tree canopies provided stem diameter and biomass carbon estimates that were within 3% of comparable ground based estimates in the Ohio site and produced similar biomass estimates for a limited number of plots in the Duke forest. Tree height change between time periods and canopy segmentation from multispectral imagery allowed calculation of forest carbon stock change at costs that are comparable to those for ground-based methods. This work demonstrates the potential of lower cost imagery systems enhanced with laser data to collect high quality imagery and paired laser data for forestry and environmental applications. Additional research on automated canopy segmentation and multi-temporal image registration is needed to refine these methods for commercial use.
Date: July 31, 2007
Creator: MacDicken, Kenneth Glenn
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Feasibility Study of Carbon Sequestration Through Reforestation in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed of Virginia

Description: The Chesapeake Rivers conservation area encompasses approximately 2,000 square miles of agricultural and forest lands in four Virginia watersheds that drain to the Chesapeake Bay. Consulting a time series of classified Landsat imagery for the Chesapeake Rivers conservation area, the project team developed a GIS-based protocol for identifying agricultural lands that could be reforested, specifically agricultural lands that had been without forest since 1990. Subsequent filters were applied to the initial candidate reforestation sites, including individual sites > 100 acres and sites falling within TNC priority conservation areas. The same data were also used to produce an analysis of baseline changes in forest cover within the study period. The Nature Conservancy and the Virginia Department of Forestry identified three reforestation/management models: (1) hardwood planting to establish old-growth forest, (2) loblolly pine planting to establish working forest buffer with hardwood planting to establish an old-growth core, and (3) loblolly pine planting to establish a working forest. To assess the relative carbon sequestration potential of these different strategies, an accounting of carbon and total project costs was completed for each model. Reforestation/management models produced from 151 to 171 tons carbon dioxide equivalent per acre over 100 years, with present value costs of from $2.61 to $13.28 per ton carbon dioxide equivalent. The outcome of the financial analysis was especially sensitive to the land acquisition/conservation easement cost, which represented the most significant, and also most highly variable, single cost involved. The reforestation/management models explored all require a substantial upfront investment prior to the generation of carbon benefits. Specifically, high land values represent a significant barrier to reforestation projects in the study area, and it is precisely these economic constraints that demonstrate the economic additionality of any carbon benefits produced via reforestation--these are outcomes over and above what is currently possible given existing market ...
Date: March 1, 2007
Creator: Lacatell, Andy; Shoch, David; Stanley, Bill & Kant, Zoe
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Genome sequences of two Phytophthora species responsible for Sudden Oak Death and Soybean Root Rot provide novel insights into their evolutionary origins and mechanisms of pathogenesis

Description: The approximately 60 species of Phytophthora are all destructive pathogens, causing rots of roots, stems, leaves and fruits of a wide range of agriculturally and ornamentally important plants (1). Some species, such as P. cinnamomi, P. parasitica and P. cactorum, each attack hundreds of different plant host species, whereas others are more restricted. Some of the crops where Phytophthora infections cause the greatest financial losses include potato, soybean, tomato, alfalfa, tobacco, peppers, cucurbits, pineapple, strawberry, raspberry and a wide range of perennial tree crops, especially citrus, avocado, almonds, walnuts, apples and cocoa, and they also heavily affect the ornamental, nursery and forestry industries. The economic damage overall to crops in the United States by Phytophthora species is estimated in the tens of billions of dollars, including the costs of control measures, and worldwide it is many times this amount (1). In the northern midwest of the U.S., P. sojae causes $200 million in annual losses to soybean alone, and worldwide causes around $1-2 billion in losses per year. P. infestans infections resulted in the Irish potato famine last century and continues to be a difficult and worsening problem for potato and tomato growers worldwide, with worldwide costs estimated at $5 billion per year.
Date: December 1, 2005
Creator: Tyler, Brett M.; Tripathi, Sucheta; Aerts, Andrea; Bensasson, Douda; Dehal, Paramvir; Dubchak, Inna et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Biology and management of insect pests in North American intensively managed hardwood forest systems.

Description: Annu. Rev. Entomol. 50:1-29. Abstract Increasing demand for wood and wood products is putting stress on traditional forest production areas, leading to long-term economic and environmental concerns. Intensively managed hardwood forest systems (IMHFS), grown using conventional agricultural as well as forestry methods, can help alleviate potential problems in natural forest production areas. Although IMHFS can produce more biomass per hectare per year than natural forests, the ecologically simplified, monocultural systems may greatly increase the crops susceptibility to pests. Species in the genera Populus and Salix comprise the greatest acreage in IMHFS in North America, but other species, including Liquidambar styracifua and Platanus occidentalis, are also important. We discuss life histories, realized and potential damage, and management options for the most economically infuential pests that affect these hardwood species. The substantial inherent challenges associated with pest management in the monocultural environments created by IMHFS are reviewed. Finally, we discuss ways to design IMHFS that may reduce their susceptibility to pests, increase their growth and productivity potential, and create a more sustainable environment.
Date: January 1, 2005
Creator: Coyle, David R.; Nebeker, T., E.; Hart, E., R. & Mattson, W., J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department