4,258 Matching Results

Search Results

Advanced search parameters have been applied.

Bibliography for the Satellite Power System (SPS) Concept Development and Evaluation Program

Description: This bibliography encompasses systems definition and engineering aspects; environmental assessment of microwave health and ecology, risks to space workers and atmospheric effects; a societal assessment covering resource requirements (land and materials) international and institutional issues; and a comparative assessment of the SPS Reference System relative to other advanced energy technologies, such as fusion. (MHR)
Date: April 1, 1981
Creator: Abromavage, M.; Calzadilla, R. & Murray, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Environmental analysis of geopressured-geothermal prospect areas, De Witt and Colorado counties, Texas. Final report, March 1 - August 31, 1979

Description: Information collected and analyzed for a preliminary environmental analysis of geopressured geothermal prospect areas in Colorado and DeWitt Counties, Texas is presented. Specific environmental concerns for each geopressured geothermal prospect area are identified and discussed. Approximately 218 km/sup 2/(85 mi/sup 2/) were studied in the vicinity of each prospect area to: (1) conduct an environmental analysis to identify more and less suited areas for geopressured test wells; and (2) provide an environmental data base for future development of geopressured geothermal energy resources. A series of maps and tables are included to illustrate environmental characteristics including: geology, water resources, soils, current land use, vegetation, wildlife, and meteorological characteristics, and additional relevant information on cultural resources, power- and pipelines, and regulatory agencies. A series of transparent overlays at the scale of the original mapping has also been produced for the purposes of identifying and ranking areas of potential conflict between geopressured geothermal development and environmental characteristics. The methodology for ranking suitability of areas within the two prospect areas is discussed in the appendix. (MHR)
Date: February 1, 1980
Creator: Gustavson, T.C.; Reeder, F.S. & Badger, E.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Laboratory directed research and development. FY 1991 program activities: Summary report

Description: The purposes of Argonne`s Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program are to encourage the development of novel concepts, enhance the Laboratory`s R&D capabilities, and further the development of its strategic initiatives. Among the aims of the projects supported by the Program are establishment of engineering ``proof-of-principle``; development of an instrumental prototype, method, or system; or discovery in fundamental science. Several of these project are closely associated with major strategic thrusts of the Laboratory as described in Argonne`s Five Year Institutional Plan, although the scientific implications of the achieved results extend well beyond Laboratory plans and objectives. The projects supported by the Program are distributed across the major programmatic areas at Argonne. Areas of emphasis are (1) advanced accelerator and detector technology, (2) x-ray techniques in biological and physical sciences, (3) advanced reactor technology, (4) materials science, computational science, biological sciences and environmental sciences. Individual reports summarizing the purpose, approach, and results of projects are presented.
Date: November 15, 1991
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Methodology for integrated evaluation of alternative siting and treatment, storage, and disposal strategies for U.S. Department of Energy waste management

Description: A computational model named WASTE-MGMT has been developed by Argonne National Laboratory in support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) to assist in the analysis of alternative approaches to the management of existing and future radioactive wastes at DOE facilities. Input to the model includes waste inventory and characterization data at each DOE site; unit operations data for the facilities used for treatment, storage and disposal (TSD) of the wastes; and information about the alternative approaches for the TSD of the wastes and for the siting of such TSD facilities. The quantities calculated by the model include the air emissions of radionuclides and hazardous chemicals during operation of the TSD facilities, the quantities and characteristics of the wastes processes annually at these facilities, and the quantities and characteristics of the waste shipped among sites. These quantities are then used as input to calculate the cost and the environmental and socioeconomic impacts resulting from the TSD of the DOE wastes under various alternative management approaches considered in the EM PEIS.
Date: February 1, 1994
Creator: Avci, H.; Habegger, L. & Kotek, T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Regional Issue Identification and Assessment Program (RIIA). Socioeconomic impacts of proposed power plants in the northeast: issue paper 1

Description: Each new major electric generating facility during its construction and operation periods presents a variety of social and economic consequences to the local, state, and regional areas. The potential for delay due to socioeconomic factors and the economic costs and benefits associated with proposed power plants are described with regard to two energy development scenarios: (1) Department of Energy National Energy Plan I and (2) a utility plan composite. Only proposed power plants with capacities over 400 MW and slated for completion by 1990 located in the three eastern federal regions (1, 2, and 3) are included.
Date: May 1, 1979
Creator: W., Metz.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Value distribution assessment of geothermal development in Lake County, CA

Description: A value distribution assessment is defined as the determination of the distribution of benefits and costs of a proposed or actual development, with the intent of comparing such a development with alternative plans. Included are not only the social and economic effects, but also people's perceptions of their roles and how they are affected by the proposed or actual development. Discussion is presented under the following section headings: on morality and ethics; the vanishing community; case study of pre-development planning--Lake County; methodology for research; Lake County geothermal energy resource; decision making; Planning Commission hearing; communication examples; benefit tracing; response to issues raised by the report of the State Geothermal Task Force; and, conclusions and recommendations. (JGB)
Date: October 1, 1977
Creator: Churchman, C.W.; Nelson, H.G. & Eacret, K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Soil studies. Soil inventory studies: mapping and description

Description: Soils on the Geokinetic Oil Shale Project site in Uintah County, Utah are described, classified and mapped. This interim report contains baseline information for soil series. Preliminary identification was made using black and white aerial photography and later verified in the field. Soil units are classified according to the USDA soil nomenclature. (DMC)
Date: January 1, 1979
Creator: Olgeirson, E.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

IRP methods for Environmental Impact Statements of utility expansion plans

Description: Most large electric utilities and a growing number of gas utilities in the United States are using a planning method -- Integrated Resource Planning (IRP) - which incorporates demand-side management (DSM) programs whenever the marginal cost of the DSM programs are lower than the marginal cost of supply-side expansion options. Argonne National Laboratory has applied the IRP method in its socio-economic analysis of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) of power marketing for a system of electric utilities in the mountain and western regions of the United States. Applying the IRP methods provides valuable information to the participants in an EIS process involving capacity expansion of an electric or gas utility. The major challenges of applying the IRP method within an EIS are the time consuming and costly task of developing a least cost expansion path for each altemative, the detailed quantification of environmental damages associated with capacity expansion, and the explicit inclusion of societal-impacts to the region.
Date: January 1, 1992
Creator: Cavallo, J.D.; Hemphill, R.C. & Veselka, T.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Less Developed Countries Energy System Network Simulator, LDC-ESNS: a brief description

Description: Prepared for the Brookhaven National Laboratory Developing Countries Energy Program, this report describes the Less Developed Countries Energy System Network Simulator (LDC-ESNS), a tool which provides a quantitative representation of the energy system of an LDC. The network structure of the energy supply and demand system, the model inputs and outputs, and the possible uses of the model for analysis are described.
Date: April 1, 1978
Creator: Reisman, A & Malone, R
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Action plan for the Tiger Team assessment report

Description: This document contains responses and planned actions that address the findings of the Tiger Team Assessment of Brookhaven National Laboratory, June 1990. In addition, the document contains descriptions of the management and organizational structure to be used in conducting planned actions, root causes for the problems identified in the findings, responses, planned actions, schedules and milestones for completing planned actions, and, where known, costs associated with planned actions.
Date: August 30, 1990
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Analytical framework for the assessment of energy resource and technology options for developing countries

Description: The purpose of this analysis is to evaluate the potential of various energy resource and technology options in meeting national economic and social development goals for developing countries. The kinds of resource options of interest are the development of various indigenous conventional resources such as oil, oil shale, natural gas, coal, uranium, hydropower, or geothermal energy. Technology options would include, for example, advanced coal-combustion technologies, solar energy for water heating or crop drying, wind-driven irrigation pumps, and energy-efficient industrial processes. In general, there are two categories of options to be considered: those that correspond to the accelerated implementation of existing elements of the energy system (such as oil-fired electricity generation) and those that correspond to the introduction of a new technology (such as solar electricity). The various resource and technology options are analyzed with respect to a number of parameters of concern, or objective functions, or ''payoff functions.'' Among the most prominent of these are the following: total fuel demand and fuel mix; oil imports and exports; national social goals; total energy costs; balance of payments; labor and capital requirements; and environmental quality. The basic approach is described.
Date: February 1, 1978
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Emissions from ethanol and LPG fueled vehicles

Description: This paper addresses the environmental concerns of using neat ethanol and liquified petroleum gas (LPG) as transportation fuels in the US Low-level blends of ethanol (10%) with gasoline have been used as fuels in the US for more than a decade, but neat ethanol (85% or more) has only been used extensively in Brazil. LPG, which consists mostly of propane, is already used extensively as a vehicle fuel in the US, but its use has been limited primarily to converted fleet vehicles. Increasing US interest in alternative fuels has raised the possibility of introducing neat ethanol vehicles into the market and expanding the number of LPG vehicles. Use of such vehicles and increased production and consumption of fuel ethanol and LPG will undoubtedly have environmental impacts. If the impacts are determined to be severe, they could act as barriers to the introduction of neat ethanol and LPG vehicles. Environmental concerns include exhaust and evaporative emissions and their impact on ozone formation and global warming, toxic emissions from fuel combustion and evaporation, and agricultural emissions from production of ethanol. The paper is not intended to be judgmental regarding the overall attractiveness of ethanol or LPG compared to other transportation fuels. The environmental concerns are reviewed and summarized, but the only conclusion reached is that there is no single concern that is likely to prevent the introduction of neat ethanol fueled vehicles or the increase in LPG fueled vehicles.
Date: December 31, 1992
Creator: Pitstick, M. E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

High-level radioactive wastes. Supplement 1

Description: This bibliography contains information on high-level radioactive wastes included in the Department of Energy's Energy Data Base from August 1982 through December 1983. These citations are to research reports, journal articles, books, patents, theses, and conference papers from worldwide sources. Five indexes, each preceded by a brief description, are provided: Corporate Author, Personal Author, Subject, Contract Number, and Report Number. 1452 citations.
Date: September 1, 1984
Creator: McLaren, L.H. (ed.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Wetland mitigation banking for the oil and gas industry: Assessment, conclusions, and recommendations

Description: Wetland mitigation banks are already in existence in the United States, and the number is increasing. To date, most of these banks have been created and operated for mitigation of impacts arising from highway or commercial development and have not been associated with the oil and gas industry. Argonne National Laboratory evaluated the positive and negative aspects of wetland mitigation banking for the oil and gas industry by examining banks already created for other uses by federal, state, and private entities. Specific issues addressed in this study include (1) the economic, ecological, and technical effectiveness of existing banks; (2) the changing nature of local, state, and federal jurisdiction; and (3) the unique regulatory and jurisdictional problems affecting bank developments associated with the oil and gas industry.
Date: January 1, 1994
Creator: Wilkey, P. L.; Sundell, R. C.; Bailey, K. A. & Hayes, D. C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

International conference on the role of the polar regions in global change: Proceedings. Volume 2

Description: The International Conference on the Role of the Polar Regions in Global Change took place on the campus of the University of Alaska Fairbanks on June 11--15, 1990. The goal of the conference was to define and summarize the state of knowledge on the role of the polar regions in global change, and to identify gaps in knowledge. To this purpose experts in a wide variety of relevant disciplines were invited to present papers and hold panel discussions. While there are numerous conferences on global change, this conference dealt specifically with the polar regions which occupy key positions in the global system. These two volumes of conference proceedings include papers on (1) detection and monitoring of change; (2) climate variability and climate forcing; (3) ocean, sea ice, and atmosphere interactions and processes; and (4) effects on biota and biological feedbacks; (5) ice sheet, glacier and permafrost responses and feedbacks, (6) paleoenvironmental studies; and, (7) aerosol and trace gases.
Date: December 1, 1991
Creator: Weller, G.; Wilson, C. L. & Severin, B. A. B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Environmental assessment of remedial action at the Lowman Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Lowman, Idaho. Final

Description: This document assesses the environmental impacts of stabilization on site of the contaminated materials at the Lowman uranium mill tailings site. The Lowman site is 0.5 road mile northeast of the unincorporated village of Lowman, Idaho, and 73 road miles from Boise, Idaho. The Lowman site consists of piles of radioactive sands, an ore storage area, abandoned mill buildings, and windblown/waterborne contaminated areas. A total of 29.5 acres of land are contaminated and most of this land occurs within the 35-acre designated site boundary. The proposed action is to stabilize the tailings and other contaminated materials on the site. A radon barrier would be constructed over the consolidated residual radioactive materials and various erosion control measures would be implemented to ensure the long-term stability of the disposal cell. Radioactive constituents and other hazardous constituents were not detected in the groundwater beneath the Lowman site. The groundwater beneath the disposal cell would not become contaminated during or after remedial action so the maximum concentration limits or background concentrations for the contaminants listed in the draft EPA groundwater protection standards would be met at the point of compliance. No significant impacts were identified as a result of the proposed remedial action at the Lowman site.
Date: January 1, 1991
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Hanford immobilized low-activity tank waste performance assessment

Description: The Hanford Immobilized Low-Activity Tank Waste Performance Assessment examines the long-term environmental and human health effects associated with the planned disposal of the vitrified low-level fraction of waste presently contained in Hanford Site tanks. The tank waste is the by-product of separating special nuclear materials from irradiated nuclear fuels over the past 50 years. This waste has been stored in underground single and double-shell tanks. The tank waste is to be retrieved, separated into low and high-activity fractions, and then immobilized by private vendors. The US Department of Energy (DOE) will receive the vitrified waste from private vendors and plans to dispose of the low-activity fraction in the Hanford Site 200 East Area. The high-level fraction will be stored at Hanford until a national repository is approved. This report provides the site-specific long-term environmental information needed by the DOE to issue a Disposal Authorization Statement that would allow the modification of the four existing concrete disposal vaults to provide better access for emplacement of the immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) containers; filling of the modified vaults with the approximately 5,000 ILAW containers and filler material with the intent to dispose of the containers; construction of the first set of next-generation disposal facilities. The performance assessment activity will continue beyond this assessment. The activity will collect additional data on the geotechnical features of the disposal sites, the disposal facility design and construction, and the long-term performance of the waste. Better estimates of long-term performance will be produced and reviewed on a regular basis. Performance assessments supporting closure of filled facilities will be issued seeking approval of those actions necessary to conclude active disposal facility operations. This report also analyzes the long-term performance of the currently planned disposal system as a basis to set requirements on the waste form and the facility design ...
Date: March 26, 1998
Creator: Mann, F. M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Use of mediation to resolve the dispute over low-head hydroelectric development at Swan Lake

Description: In 1978, the Maine Hydroelectric Development Corporation announced that the company planned to renovate five dams on the Goose River near Belfast, Maine to generate electricity. The most important part of the plan involved the use of the first of the dams, at the lower end of Swan Lake, to regulate the flow of water to the downstream dams. For Maine Hydro, management of the Swan Lake dam could make an otherwise marginal proposal lucrative. However, Swan Lake is vitally important to the residents of Swanville. The town was so concerned about the impact of this proposed hydroelectric project that it petitioned the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) to deny Maine Hydro's application on the grounds that it would damage the environment, reduce property values and eliminate recreational opportunities for its citizens. This report was written by the mediator of the dispute and represents the views and behavior of the parties as the mediator understood them. It is intended to present the mediator's observations in a way which will inform and assist others who may someday face a difficult situation like the one the Town of Swanville and Maine Hydroelectric Development Corporation faced, and successfully resolved, in the spring and summer of 1979.
Date: August 1, 1980
Creator: O'Connor, D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

PETC Review, Issue 1, March 1990

Description: This issue of PETC Review contains short discussion on the following topics: (1)``SO{sub 2} Control and Duct Injection: A Solution to Acid Rain``--research on duct injection; (2)``Acid Rain Abatement and Advanced Coal Cleaning: A Precombustion Option``--research on selective agglomeration and advanced froth flotation; (3)``Two-Stage Liquefaction of Coal``--PETC`s efforts to further the viability of this technology; (4)``Clean Coal Technology: Energy and the Environment``--the Clean Coal Technology Program is demonstrating technologies that show coal can be both efficient and environmentally acceptable. Supplemental sections on events, special focuses, calendars, publication lists, etc. are also included.
Date: March 1, 1990
Creator: Blaustein, B.; Reiss, J.; Martin, G.; Hammer, D. & Mills, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Wildlife Habitat Impact Assessment, Chief Joseph Dam Project, Washington : Project Report 1992.

Description: Under the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980, and the subsequent Northwest Power Planning Council`s Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program, a wildlife habitat impact assessment and identification of mitigation objectives have been developed for the US Army Corps of Engineer`s Chief Joseph Dam Project in north-central Washington. This study will form the basis for future mitigation planning and implementation.
Date: January 1, 1992
Creator: Kuehn, Douglas & Berger, Matthew
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Environmental Assessment for the new sanitary sludge land application sites at the Savannah River Site

Description: Action is necessary to allow the Savannah River Site (SRS) to provide for efficient disposal of sanitary sludge for SRS as forecast by the latest site projections (WSRC, 1991) and modified by the latest US Department of Energy (DOE) planning guidance for SRS (Stello, 1993). From 1986 to 1992, sanitary wastewater sludge was applied on SRS lands in accordance with a South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) permit as part of the reclamation of SRS`s F- and H-Area borrow pits (disturbed land). This reclamation is essentially complete and, if land disposal of sludge is to continue, new land application sites on SRS must be selected as the extended permit for applying sludge to the borrow pits expired in 1992. Currently, sludge is being trucked offsite for disposal by a subcontractor to a Publicly Owned Treatment Works (POTW) near Augusta, Georgia (WSRC, 1992a). This Environmental Assessment (EA) has been prepared by DOE to assess the potential environmental impacts of onsite land disposal of treated sanitary sewage sludge from SRS. The proposed action is to replace the present offsite disposal of the treated sanitary sludge from existing SRS wastewater treatment plants with onsite reuse through land application. The proposed action is independent of SRS production operations and is necessary for more efficient disposal of SRS sanitary sludge at lower costs. The proposed land application at SRS is treated as part of the preliminary Reconfiguration Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) ``No Action`` alternative (DOE, 1991). The sludge from SRS sanitary wastewater treatment plants is nonhazardous. Onsite disposal of this sludge allows SRS to comply with current DOE policies to keep any DOE wastes onsite where possible and to eliminate any potential accidents due to continuing offsite transportation of sanitary wastes (DOE, 1990a).
Date: February 1, 1994
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

International conference on the role of the polar regions in global change: Proceedings. Volume 1

Description: The International Conference on the Role of the Polar Regions in Global Change took place on the campus of the University of Alaska Fairbanks on June 11--15, 1990. The goal of the conference was to define and summarize the state of knowledge on the role of the polar regions in global change, and to identify gaps in knowledge. To this purpose experts in a wide variety of relevant disciplines were invited to present papers and hold panel discussions. While there are numerous conferences on global change, this conference dealt specifically with polar regions which occupy key positions in the global system. These two volumes of conference proceedings include papers on (1) detection and monitoring of change; (2) climate variability and climate forcing; (3) ocean, sea ice, and atmosphere interactions and processes; (4) effects on biota and biological feedbacks; (5) ice sheet, glacier and permafrost responses and feedbacks; (6) paleoenvironmental studies; and, (7) aerosols and trace gases.
Date: December 1, 1991
Creator: Weller, G.; Wilson, C. L. & Severin, B. A. B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Groundwater flow model for the General Separations Area, Savannah River Site

Description: The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a Department of Energy (DOE) facility located near Aiken, South Carolina. Assessment of groundwater flow rates and directions, potential contaminant transport times, and concentration of potential contaminants is required to determine current and future environmental effects resulting from releases by these facilities. Proposed closure actions and/or remedial alternatives also need to be evaluated. Numerical groundwater flow and solute transport models are a means of assessing the environmental effects on the groundwater system. They provide a logical method of integrating all available data into a consistent framework for quantitative analysis. The results of groundwater models can be used directly for input to management decisions and design/construct issues or can provide input into risk assessment models for site evaluations. GeoTrans, Inc. was contracted by the Environmental Restoration Department of WSRC to develop a groundwater model of the entire General Separations Area (GSA). Of particular interest is the area surrounding the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) as shown in Figure 1.2. The model developed in this phase of the study will be used to assess groundwater flow issues for the entire GSA. The second phase of the study will address contaminant transport issues specific to the area surrounding the MWMF.
Date: May 15, 1992
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Ecological evaluation of proposed discharge of dredged material from Oakland Harbor into ocean waters (Phase 3 B of -42-foot project). Volume 1, Analyses and discussion

Description: The Water Resources Development Act of 1986 (Public Law 99-662) authorized the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) San Francisco District, to deepen and widen the navigational channels of the Oakland Inner and Outer Harbors to accomodate deeper-draft vessels. The USACE is considering several disposal options for the dredged material removed during these channel improvements including open-water disposal. Dredged material proposed for open-water disposal must be evaluated to determine the potential impacts of the disposal activity on the water column and disposal site enviromments. The USACE requested that Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) conduct studies to evaluate open-water disposal options for Oakland Harbor sediments. This request developed into the Oakland Harbor Phase III Program. This is Volume 1 of a two-volume report that presents information gathered to determine the suitability of ocean disposal of sediments dredged from Oakland Harbor. This volume contains project background, materials and methods, results, discussion, and conclusions.
Date: June 1, 1992
Creator: Kohn, N. P.; Ward, J. A.; Mayhew, H. L.; Word, J. Q.; Barrows, E. S.; Goodwin, S. M. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department