388 Matching Results

Search Results

Advanced search parameters have been applied.

Rheology of coal-water slurries prepared by the HP roll mill grinding of coal

Description: The objective of the research is the development of improved technology for the preparation of coal-water slurries, which have potential for replacing fuel oil in direct combustion. The fine grinding of coal is a crucial step in the manufacture of coal-water slurries. In this context, currently available grinding mills exhibit poor energy efficiency for size reduction and non-optimum packing characteristics of the ground coal. The first increases the cost of manufacture of coal-water slurries and the second adversely affects their rheological properties. The newly invented choke-fed, high-pressure roll mill is up to 50% more energy efficient and, moreover, there are reasons to believe that it produces a size distribution of ground particles which is closer to the dense packing composition. The high-pressure roll mill (which is perhaps the only really significant innovation in industrial comminution in this century) has lower capital cost, occupies less floor space, shows negligible wear rate, accepts feed with a wide range of moisture contents and, of particular importance, it can be scaled up to grind hundreds of tons of solids per hour. The high-pressure roll mill provides a unique opportunity to develop an improved technology for preparing coal-water slurries. Our research group in the University of California at Berkeley not only has a fully instrumented, laboratory-scale, choke-fed. high-pressure roll mill (the only one of its kind in the United States) but also fully instrumented laboratory ball mills for comparative fine coal preparation purposes. In this research program, our plans are to systematically investigate comminution energy consumption, deagglomeration procedures, and the stability and rheology of coal-water slurry fuel prepared with high-pressure roll mill, and to compare the results with slurry prepared with ball-milled coal.
Date: December 1, 1992
Creator: Fuerstenau, D.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Superclean coal-water slurry combustion testing in an oil-fired boiler

Description: The Pennsylvania State University is conducting a superclean coal-water slurry (SCCWS) program for the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania with the objective of determining the capability of effectively firing SCCWS in an industrial boiler designed for oil. Penn State has entered into a cooperative agreement with DOE to determine if SCCWS (a fuel containing coal with 3.0 wt.% ash and 0.9 wt.% sulfur) can effectively be burned in an oil-designed industrial boiler without adverse impact on boiler rating, maintainability, reliability, and availability. The project will provide information on the design of new systems specifically configured to fire these clean coal-based fuels. The project consists of four phases: (1) design, permitting, and test planning, (2) construction and start up, (3) demonstration and evaluation (1,000-hour demonstration), and (4) program expansion (additional 1,000 hours of testing). The boiler testing will determine if the SCCWS combustion characteristics, heat release rate, fouling and slagging behavior, corrosion and erosion limits, and fuel transport, storage, and handling characteristics can be accommodated in an oil-designed boiler system. In addition, the proof-of-concept demonstration will generate data to determine how the properties of SCCWS and its parent coal affect boiler performance. Economic factors associated with retrofitting and operating boilers will be identified to assess the viability of future oil-to-coal retrofits.
Date: October 13, 1992
Creator: Miller, B.G.; Pisupati, S.V.; Poe, R.L.; Morrison, J.L.; Xie, J.; Walsh, P.M. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Utilization of coal-water fuels in fire-tube boilers

Description: Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (EER) completed the design engineering and presented the design to DOE on February 21, 1992. DOE then released EER to begin material procurement. This project is a demonstration for firing coal-water slurry in a fire-tube boiler. The specific objective of this contract is to demonstrate the potential for coal-water fuels to be burned effectively in a fire-tube boiler designed for oil or gas. Task 1 provides for the design and retrofit of the host boiler to fire coal-water slurry. The host boiler is a Cleaver Brooks fire-tube boiler located at the University of Alabama Tuscaloosa campus. EER has negotiated a host agreement with the University for the use of the boiler on the test program and has prepared a site plan. Based on the initial design that was presented in the proposal, EER prepared a detailed design of the slurry retrofit. It included additional site specific analysis of toe combustion and heat transfer processes occurring in the fire-tube. The design was submitted to DOE in the form of a design package for the components and a design package for the component integration. After receiving DOE approval at the formal review meeting, EER began to procure the material and installation will follow. At the completion of Task 1, the host boiler will be fully equipped to fire slurry.
Date: January 1, 1992
Creator: Sommer, T. & Melick, T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels

Description: The Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of the US Department of Energy has contracted with Combustion Engineering, Inc. (CE) to perform a three-year project on Combustion Characterization of Beneficiated Coal-Based Fuels.'' The beneficiated coals are produced by other contractors under the DOE Coal Preparation Program. Several contractor-developed advanced coal cleaning processes are being run at the cleaning facility in Homer City, Pennsylvania, to produce 20-ton batches of fuels for shipment to CE's laboratory in Windsor, Connecticut. CE then processes the products into either a coal-water fuel (CVVT) or a dry microfine pulverized coal (DMPC) form for combustion testing. The objectives of this project include: (1) the development of an engineering data base which will provide detailed information on the properties of BCFs influencing combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and emissions; and (2) the application of this technical data base to predict the performance and economic impacts of firing the BCFs in various commercial boiler designs. The technical approach used to develop the technical data includes: bench-scale fuel property, combustion, and ash deposition tests; pilot-scale combustion and ash effects tests; and full-scale combustion tests. Subcontractors to CE to perform parts of the test work are the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Physical Science, Inc. Technology Company (PSIT) and the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (UNDEERC). Twenty fuels will be characterized during the three-year base program: three feed coals, fifteen BCFS, and two conventionally cleaned coals for full-scale tests. Approximately, nine BCFs will be in dry microfine coal (DMPC) form, and six BCFs will be in coal-water fuel (CWF) form. Additional BCFs would be characterized during optional project supplements.
Date: November 1, 1990
Creator: Chow, O.K. & Nsakala, N.Y.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Coal-fueled diesel locomotive test

Description: The biggest challenges to the development of a commercially-acceptable coal-fueled diesel-electric locomotive are integrating all systems into a working unit that can be operated in railroad service. This involves mainly the following three systems: (1) the multi-cylinder coal-fueled diesel engine, (2) the locomotive and engine controls, and (3) the CWS fuel supply system. Consequently, a workable 12-cylinder coal-fueled diesel engine was considered necessary at this stage to evolve the required locomotive support systems, in addition to gaining valuable multi-cylinder engine operating experience. The CWS fuel used during this project was obtained from Otisca, Inc. (Syracuse, NY). It was prepared from micronized and deashed Kentucky Blue Gem coal to 49.0% coal loading by weight, with less than 1% ash and 5 micron mean diameter particle size. Its higher heating value was analyzed at approximately 34630 kJ/k. Anti-agglomerating additive Triton X-114 was added to the CWS at GE Transportation Systems at 2% of coal weight. The nature of the Otisca CWS fuel makes it inherently more difficult to store, pump, and inject than diesel fuel, since concepts which govern Newtonian or normally viscous liquids do not apply entirely to CWS. Otisca CWS tends to be unstable and to settle in tanks and lines after a period of time, making it necessary to provide a means of agitation during storage. To avoid long term settling problems and to minimize losses, piping velocities were designed to be in the 60-90 m/min range.
Date: January 1, 1993
Creator: Hsu, B.D.; McDowell, R.E.; Confer, G.L. & Basic, S.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Characteristics of coal/light hydrocarbon slurries in spray combustion. Semi-annual progress report, 1 September 1980-28 February 1981

Description: This report summarizes the progress made during the first six months of the grant period. The status of each of the three major task areas is discussed: the atomization study, the analytical droplet model, and the combustion study. The time-period has been used primarily to design and begin fabrication of the experimental atomization and combustion facilities. No data is presented in either of these areas. Significant progress has been made in the development of the numerical droplet model. The results of a preliminary parametric study are presented for a single coal particle in a one-millimeter methanol droplet. The importance of gas phase velocity and coal particle diameter bringing the solid material to the droplet surface is discussed.
Date: March 6, 1981
Creator: Grosshandler, W.L.; Crowe, C.T. & Chung, J.N.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Rheological properties essential for the atomization of coal water slurries (CWS)

Description: During the previous quarter, it was noted that understanding the rheology of polymeric additives used in enhancing the stability of the CWS was essential in meeting the project objectives. Thus, further review of the literature was carried out to gain information on the rheology of polymeric additives, particularly at high shear rates. Philippoff and Hess [1] reported the existence of four distinct flow regions in the behavior of flow curve analysis of polymer solutions (Figure 1). These regions are characterized by (1) A Newtonian Region; (2) A non-Newtonian pseudoplastic region; (3) A second Newtonian region at high shear rates 10[sup 5] to 10[sup 6] sec[sup [minus]1]; (4) and a region of steepening slope identified as the onset of turbulence. Efforts during this past quarter were therefore directed towards the study of high shear rheology of the CWS.
Date: January 1, 1992
Creator: Ohene, F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Novel injector techniques for coal-fueled diesel engines

Description: This report, entitled Novel Injector Techniques for Coal-Fueled Diesel Engines,'' describes the progress and findings of a research program aimed at development of a dry coal powder fuel injector in conjunction with the Thermal Ignition Combustion System (TICS) concept to achieve autoignition of dry powdered coal in a single-cylinder high speed diesel engine. The basic program consisted of concept selection, analysis and design, bench testing and single cylinder engine testing. The coal injector concept which was selected was a one moving part dry-coal-powder injector utilizing air blast injection. Adiabatics has had previous experience running high speed diesel engines on both direct injected directed coal-water-slurry (CWS) fuel and also with dry coal powder aspirated into the intake air. The Thermal Ignition Combustion System successfully ignited these fuels at all speeds and loads without requiring auxiliary ignition energy such as pilot diesel fuel, heated intake air or glow or spark plugs. Based upon this prior experience, it was shown that the highest efficiency and fastest combustion was with the dry coal, but that the use of aspiration of coal resulted in excessive coal migration into the engine lubrication system. Based upon a desire of DOE to utilize a more modern test engine, the previous naturally-aspirated Caterpillar model 1Y73 single cylinder engine was replaced with a turbocharged (by use of shop air compressor and back pressure control valve) single cylinder version of the Cummins model 855 engine.
Date: September 1, 1992
Creator: Badgley, P.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Pelletizing/reslurrying as a means of distributing and firing clean coal

Description: The objective of this study is to develop technology that permits the practical and economic preparation, storage, handling, and transportation of coal pellets, which can be reslurried into Coal water fuels (CWF) suitable for firing in small- and medium-size commercial and industrial boilers, furnaces, and engines. The project includes preparing coal pellets and capsules from wet filter cake that can be economically stored, handled, transported, and reslurried into a CWF that can be suitably atomized and fired at the user site. The wet cakes studied were prepared from ultra-fine (95% -325 mesh) coal beneficiated by advanced froth-flotation techniques. The coals studied included two eastern bituminous coals, one from Virginia (Elkhorn) and one from Illinois (Illinois No. 6) and one western bituminous coal from Utah (Sky Line coal).
Date: March 17, 1992
Creator: Conkle, H.N.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Superclean coal-water slurry combustion testing in an oil-fired boiler

Description: The Pennsylvania State University is conducting a superclean coal-water slurry (SCCWS) program for the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania with the objective of determining the capability of effectively firing SCCWS in an industrial boiler designed for heavy fuel oil. Penn State has entered into a cooperative agreement with DOE to determine if SCCWS (a fuel containing coal with 3.0 wt.% ash and 0.9 wt.% sulfur) can effectively be burned in a heavy fuel oil-designed industrial boiler without adverse impact on boiler rating, maintainability, reliability, and availability. The project will provide information on the design of new systems specifically configured to fire these clean coal-based fuels. The project consists of four phases: (1) design, permitting, and test planning, (2) construction and start up, (3) demonstration and evaluation (1,000-hour demonstration), and (4) program expansion (additional 1,000 hours of testing). The boiler testing wig determine if the SCCWS combustion characteristics, heat release rate, fouling and slagging behavior, corrosion and erosion limits, and fuel transport, storage, and handling characteristics can be accommodated in an oil-designed boiler system. In addition, the proof-of-concept demonstration will generate data to determine how the properties of SCCWS and its parent coal affect boiler performance. Economic factors associated with retrofitting boilers will be identified
Date: April 21, 1993
Creator: Miller, B.G.; Pisupati, S.V.; Poe, R.L.; Morrison, J.L.; Xie, J.; Walsh, P.M. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The physics of coal liquid slurry atomization

Description: An experimental study has been conducted on a two dimensional twin fluid atomizer in which a liquid sheet is sandwiched'' between two sheets of high speed air. High speed photography and imaging were used to study the air-liquid interface region. Average intact lengths of liquid sheets were measured. The intact lengths were studied over a liquid Reynolds number range of 4000 and a Weber number of 30. The intact lengths were found to be strongly dependent on the Reynolds and Weber numbers. An empirical equation was derived as a function of these parameters.
Date: January 1, 1992
Creator: Chigier, N. & Mansour, A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Testing of electrostatic agglomerator

Description: The ESA combustor has been redesigned for higher thermal inputs to alleviate problems due to poor CWM atomization, poor mixing, low Reynolds numbers, long ESA heatup times and high heat losses. A thermal analysis of the ESA has been made in order to estimate heatup times. Precipitator designs have been completed.
Date: January 1, 1988
Creator: Quimby, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Integrated coal preparation and CWF processing plant: Conceptual design and costing

Description: At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, a study was conducted to provide DOE with a reliable, documented estimate of the cost of producing coal-water fuel (CWF). The approach to the project was to specify a plant capacity and location, identify and analyze a suitable coal, and develop a conceptual design for an integrated coal preparation and CWF processing plant. Using this information, a definitive costing study was then conducted, on the basis of which an economic and sensitivity analysis was performed utilizing a financial evaluation model to determine a price for CWF in 1992. The design output of the integrated plant is 200 tons of coal (dry basis) per hour. Operating at a capacity factor of 83 percent, the baseline design yields approximately 1.5 million tons per year of coal on a dry basis. This is approximately equivalent to the fuel required to continuously generate 500 MW of electric power. The CWF produced by the plant is intended as a replacement for heavy oil or gas in electric utility and large industrial boilers. The particle size distribution, particularly the top size, and the ash content of the coal in the CWF are specified at significantly lower levels than is commonly found in typical pulverized coal grinds. The particle top size is 125 microns (vs typically 300m[mu] for pulverized coal) and the coal ash content is 3.8 percent. The lower top size is intended to promote complete carbon burnout at less derating in boilers that are not designed for coal firing. The reduced mineral matter content will produce ash of very fine particle size during combustion, which leads to less impaction and reduced fouling of tubes in convective passages.
Date: December 1, 1992
Creator: McHale, E.T.; Paul, A.D.; Bartis, J.T. (Science Applications International Corp., McLean, VA (United States)) & Korkmaz, M. (Roberts and Schaefer Co., Salt Lake City, UT (United States))
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Correlation of stability/rheology relationship with coal properties and chemical additives

Description: Coal-water slurry (CWS) is being considered as a near term replacement for oil in both industrial and utility applications. Selecting an economical, yet technically compatible feedstock for producing highly loaded CWS is important to the commercialization of CWS technology. Previous work has shown that the dispersing additives can represent a significant portion of CWS preparation cost. In an effort to establish a criteria for designing and preparing CWS for utilization, the relationships between coal properties and slurry quality must be determined. These relationships will enable the prediction of potential CWS quality for the particular coal candidate from some characteristic(s) of the coal. The coal content at a given viscosity varies for different coal. Thus, to develop a viable coal selection strategy using chemical surfactants as additives, the adsorption of these surfactants by the coal particle surface must be established. This work therefore, intends to screen a number of chemical surfactants and dispersants which can be used in the preparation of coal water slurry. The information derived from this screening together with the coal properties will be used to help develop a prescription to predict the stability of coal slurries.
Date: January 1, 1989
Creator: Ohene, F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Direct firing of coal-water suspensions: state-of-the-art review

Description: Coal-water combustion technology has been successfully demonstrated on a commerical scale in at least four installations, and headway has been made in describing and understanding the basic phenomena that occur during the combustion of a coal-water suspension. The handling and storage characteristics of coal-water suspensions are generally known, though engineering correlations for US coals, ground to, say, dry pulverized coal firing specifications, have not appeared in the literature. The refinement of the technology and its optimization and application to refit situations (to displace oil or natural gas), and a deeper understanding of the various aspects of the combustion process await the combined efforts of industrial, government, and university investigators throughout the world. DOE is actively involved in the development of coal-water handling and combustion technology. In addition to the preceding ARC work, they have funded Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to assist in the preparation of a comprehensive, integrated plan for a government sponsored research and development program in coal-water combustion and handling.
Date: January 1, 1980
Creator: Marnell, P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Characterization and supply of coal-based fuels

Description: Contract objectives are as follows: Develop fuel specifications to serve combustor requirements. Select coals having appropriate compositional and quality characteristics as well as an economically attractive reserve base; Provide quality assurance for both the parent coals and the fuel forms; and deliver premium coal-based fuels to combustor developers as needed for their contract work. Progress is discussed, particulary in slurry fuel preparation and particle size distribution.
Date: June 1, 1989
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development of a retrofit coal combustor for industrial applications, (Phase 1-A)

Description: Initial slurry fuels testing was undertaken during this reporting period. Two tests were conducted with slurry fuels. The purpose of these tests was twofold. First, basic injector position needed to be optimized for proper combustion of the slurries. And second, the combustors and decoupler had to be heated to slagging temperatures to allow formation of a continuous slag coating on the combustor walls. The effect of slag coating on improving combustion performance has been discussed in earlier Phase I reporting. During testing in Phase I operation, it was discovered that better combustion efficiencies were achieved once the combustor and decoupler walls were coated with slag. The reasoning behind this was twofold. First, the slag coated walls would radiate heat more intensely than refractory walls and second, the larger coal particles impinge the slag coated walls thereby increasing their residence time and allowing more complete combustion. Therefore, gathering of combustion performance data will be made only after sufficient shakedown testing has been conducted to ensure good slag coverage of chamber walls. It was also noted in these tests that the temperature in the decoupler rose to over 3400[degrees]F which is near the melting point of the refractory. In prior Phase I tests, high heat losses limited the temperatures achieved within the combustor. In the new combustors, heat losses have been reduced. Therefore, it is evident that fuel or air staging will be necessary to control combustion temperature over a reasonable range.
Date: March 1, 1989
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development of a vortex combustor (VC) for space/water heating applications (proof-of-concept model development)

Description: This is the sixth quarterly Technical Progress Report for the development of a proof-of-concept vortex combustor under interagency agreement DE-AI22-87PC79660 covering the period between 1 February 1989 and 30 April 1989. The Vortex Combustor (VC) under development here is a device to burn either Dry Ultrafine Coal (DUC) or Coal-Water Fuel (CWF) in a high swirl and low temperature environment. Being a new concept technical data relevant to the design of the proof-of-concept model is practically nonexistent. In order to minimize the risk of uncertainties, sufficient basic design data must be generated first. To achieve this, two subscale models have been built: A 0.15 MB/H exploratory model and a 0.6 MB/H experimental model. A proof-of-concept (POC) model will then be designed and built for demonstrating the concept. Work on the exploratory model has been completed and reported in our fifth quarterly technical progress report. It will be reported also in a separate topical report. During this reporting period, preparations for testing the experimental model have been completed and the setup satisfactorily shakedown tented. The design of POC model has been approved. The results are summarized in this report.
Date: June 1, 1989
Creator: Fu, T.T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Characteristics of American coals in relation to their conversion into clean energy fuels. Quarterly technical progress report, July--September 1977. [Coal-fuel oil-water slurries]

Description: The Penn State/ERDA Coal Sample Bank was expanded to include 201 new coal samples. A total of 68 characterized coal samples and 115 selected printouts of coal data were supplied upon request to the coal research community. Selected chemical and petrographic properties were statistically analyzed for 119 coal channel samples chosen from the Penn State/ERDA Coal Data Base. Installation of the pressurized laminar flow isotherml reactor has begun. Experiments have continued on the combustion pot; the study of the reactivity of a Koppers Company coke is now complete. Studies show that weight changes associated with preoxidation can be precisely meausred using a TGA apparatus. Water densities determined on 19 coals were lower when measured in the presence of a wetting agent. Study of the effect of reaction temperature on gasification of Saran carbon in air shows one percent platinum loading on Saran carbon increases gasification rates over the entire range of carbon burn-off. Study of the theoretical aspects of combustion of low volatile fuels was resumed. The computer model was expanded to include the effects of heat loss through the furnace walls and its effect on flame temperature profiles. Investigation of the combustion characteristics of coal-oil-water-air fuel mixtures was continued. Only through the use of non-equilibrium experiments can certain important combustion characteristics be studied, and computerized data acquisition is being developed to fully implement such methods.
Date: December 1, 1977
Creator: Spackman, W.; Davis, A.; Walker, P. L.; Lovell, H. L.; Essenhigh, R. H.; Vastola, F. J. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Definition of scale model slurry mixing/distribution facility

Description: This document is intended to present a definition of a scale model representing a slurry mixing/distribution facility. The 1/8'' = 1'-0'' scale model described herein depicts a mock commercial coal-in-oil slurry mixing and distribution type plant. The model represents a suggested facility for the optimization marketing of a stable coal-oil slurry to multiple users under a single specification. The raw materials are assumed to be coal, fuel oil and a stabilizer additive to keep the slurry in suspension during transit and storage. The model reflects a method for handling coal using railroad cars which are bottom dumped to a below grade track hopper, weighed and transported to a stockpile by belt conveyors. Stockpile reclaim is accomplished by a front-end loader and the coal is conveyed to the fuel preparation building. There it is pulverized and mixed with fuel oil and a stabilizer. The slurry produced is then tank stored to await shipment to the user by railroad car or truck.
Date: May 1, 1978
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Program of basic research on the preparation and stability of coal/water slurries. Quarterly report, June 30, 1984

Description: The objective of the research proposed here is to relate the surface chemistry (surface charge, wettability and additive adsorption) of a coal to its previous history of oxidation and beneficiation, and to surface analysis of each coal sample. These studies will be used to further develop the model for coal/water slurry behavior which was proposed as a result of previous studies of coal/water slurry surface chemistry carried out between September 1981 and September 1983 under Grant No. DE-FG281PC40285 from DOE/PETC. These studies are expected to lead to a better understanding of the balance among and effects of the different types of materials on the heterogeneous coal surface which will allow more effective utilization of coal/water slurries, regardless of coal source. The current two-year research program was initiated June 1, 1984, and this first quarterly report for the calendar quarter ending June 30, 1984, covers progress during the month of June, as well as some preliminary work carried out earlier in the quarter before initiation of the program. Research accomplishments and plans for the next report period are discussed for the following tasks: (1) standardizing of grinding conditions for coal number 1; (2) characterization of pulverized coal at Carnegie-Mellon University; and (3) characterization of coal/water slurries prepared from aged coals. 2 figures, 7 tables.
Date: January 1, 1984
Creator: Atlas, H.; Casassa, E.Z.; Parfitt, G.D. & Toor, E.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Mechanics/heat-transfer relation for particulate materials (for July 1991)

Description: The major emphasis this quarter has been in two areas. The first is to continue working the bugs out of the new particle pressure transducer. The second was to try and measure the particle pressures generated in a bed catalyst that is undergoing particulate fluidization. The results indicate that the stabilization of fluidized beds in that regime cannot be explained in terms of particle pressure generation. Instead, consistent with other recent observations, the observations can be explained by a material is that not completely fluidized but, instead, retains much of the properties of a solid and, in particular, can transmit particle pressure like a solid. Also, in this quarter, one of the author's students, David Wang, successfully defended his PhD thesis; his research was sponsored by this grant and concerned both the thermal conductivity measurements and the early work on particle pressures in fluidized beds. The particle pressure work was also presented at the ITEM Symposium on the Mechanics of Fluidized Beds, held at Stanford in the early part of this month.
Date: July 1, 1991
Creator: Campbell, C.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Gasifier feed: Tailor-made from Illinois coals

Description: The purpose of this research is to develop a coal slurry from waste streams using Illinois coal that is ideally suited for a gasification feed. The principle items to be studied are (1) methods of concentrating pyrite and decreasing other ash forming minerals into a high grade gasification feed using froth flotation and gravity separation techniques; (2) chemical and particle size analyses of coal slurries; (3) determination of how that slurry can be densified and to what degree of densification is optimum from the pumpability and combustibility analyses; and (4) reactivity studies.
Date: January 1, 1991
Creator: Ehrlinger, H.P. III.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

700, 100, and 20 hp combustion test facilities. Quarterly activity report, July 2, 1979-September 30, 1979, third quarter. [Coal-oil slurry combustion as retrofit]

Description: Objective of the DOE/PETC 700 H.P. Combustion Test Facility (CTF) is to show the feasibility of coal-oil slurry combustion as a retrofit technology. The coal-oil mixture (COM) parametric combustion test program in the CTF was completed successfully for 30, 40, and 50% coal-oil concentrations; plugging in the nozzles at 50% COM and burner nozzle wear were among the problems. Progress on the 100 and 20 H.P. units is also reported. (DLC)
Date: January 1, 1979
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department