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Synchronized droplet size measurements for coal-water-slurry (CWS) diesel sprays of an electronically-controlled fuel injection system

Description: Experiments were completed to study intermittent coal-water slurry (CWS) fuel sprays injected from an electronically-controlled accumulator injector system. A laser diffraction particle analyzing (LDPA) technique was used to measure the spray diameters (Sauter mean diameter, SMD) assuming the Rosin-Rammler two parameter model. In order to ensure an accurate synchronization of the measurement with the intermittent sprays, a new synchronization technique was developed using the light extinction signal as a triggering source for the data taking initiation. This technique allowed measurement of SMDs near the spray tip where the light extinction was low and the data were free from the multiscattering bias. Coal-water slurry fuel with 50% coal loading in mass containing 5 {mu}m mass median diameter coal particulates was considered. Injection pressures ranging from 28 to 110 MPa, two different nozzle orifice diameters, 0.2 ad 0.4 mm, and four axial measurement locations from 60 to 120 mm from the nozzle orifice were studied. Measurements were made for pressurized (2.0 MPa in gauge) and for ambient chamber conditions. The spray SMD showed an increase with the distance of the axial measurement location and with the ambient gas density, and showed a decrease with increasing injection pressure. A correlation of the Sauter mean diameter with the injection conditions was determined. The results were also compared with previous SMD correlations that were available only for diesel fuel sprays.
Date: December 31, 1993
Creator: Kihm, K. D.; Terracina, D. P.; Payne, S. E. & Caton, J. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Micronized-coal-water slurry sprays from a diesel engine positive displacement fuel injection system

Description: Experiments have been conducted to characterize the sprays from a modified positive displacement fuel injection system for a diesel engine. Diesel fuel water and three concentrations of micronized-coal-water slurry were used in these experiments. The injection system includes an injection jerk pump driven by an electric motor, a specially designed diaphragm to separate the abrasive coal slurry fuel from the pump, and a single-hole fuel nozzle. The sprays were injected into a pressurized chamber equipped with windows. High speed movies and still photographs of the sprays were obtained. In addition, instaneous fuel line pressures and needle lifts were obtained. Data were acquired as a function of fluid, nozzle orifice diameter, rack setting and chamber conditions. The high speed movies were used to determine spray penetration and spray growth.
Date: December 31, 1991
Creator: Caton, J. A.; Kihm, K. D.; Seshadri, A. K. & Zicterman, G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

High-pressure coal fuel processor development. Final report

Description: Caterpillar shares DOE/METC interest in demonstrating the technology required to displace petroleum-based engine fuels with various forms of low cost coal. Current DOE/METC programs on mild gasification and coal-water-slurries are addressing two approaches to this end. Engine and fuel processor system concept studies by Caterpillar have identified a third, potentially promising, option. This option includes high-pressure fuel processing of run-of-the-mine coal and direct injection of the resulting low-Btu gas stream into an ignition assisted, high compression ratio diesel engine. The compactness and predicted efficiency of the system make it suitable for application to line-haul railroad locomotives. Two overall conclusions resulted from Task 1. First direct injected, ignition assisted Diesel cycle engine combustion systems can be suitably modified to efficiently utilize low-Btu gas fuels. Second, high pressure gasification of selected run-of-the-mine coals in batch-loaded fuel processors is feasible. These two findings, taken together, significantly reduce the perceived technical risk associated with the further development of the proposed coal gas fueled Diesel cycle power plant concept. The significant conclusions from Task 2 were: An engine concept, derived from a Caterpillar 3600 series engine, and a fuel processor concept, based on scaling up a removable-canister configuration from the test rig, appear feasible; and although the results of this concept study are encouraging, further, full-scale component research and development are required before attempting a full-scale integrated system demonstration effort.
Date: December 1, 1992
Creator: Greenhalgh, M. L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Coal-fueled diesel technology development -- Fuel injection equipment for coal-fueled diesel engines

Description: Because of the abrasive and corrosive nature of coal water slurries, the development of coal-fueled diesel engine technology by GE-Transportation Systems (GE-TS) required special fuel injection equipment. GE-Corporate Research and Development (GE-CRD) undertook the design and development of fuel injectors, piston pumps, and check valves for this project. Components were tested at GE-CRD on a simulated engine cylinder, which included a cam-actuated jerk pump, prior to delivery to GE-TS for engine testing.
Date: January 1, 1994
Creator: Johnson, R. N. & Hayden, H. L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development and testing of a commercial-scale coal-fired combustion system, Phase 3. Quarterly technical progress report No. 4, July 1, 1991--September 30, 1991

Description: Within the commercial sector, oil and natural gas are the predominant fuels used to meet the space-heating needs of schools, office buildings, apartment complexes, and other similar structures. In general, these buildings require firing rates of 1 to 10 million Btu/hr. The objective of this program is to demonstrate the technical and economic viability of a coal-fired combustion system for this sector. The commercial-scale coal-water slurry (CWS)-fired space heating system will be a scale-up of a CWS-fired residential warm-air heating system developed by Tecogen under contract to the Department of Energy, Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center. This system included a patented nonslagging combustor known as IRIS, for Inertial Reactor with Internal Separation. This combustion technology, which has demonstrated high combustion efficiency using CWS fuels at input rates of 100,000 Btu/hr, will be scaled to operate at 2 to 5 millon Btu/hr. Along with the necessary fuel storage and delivery, heat recovery, and control equipment, the system will include pollution control devices to meet targeted values of NO{sub x}, S0{sub 2}, and particulate emissions. In general, the system will be designed to match the reliability, safety, turndown, and ignition performance of gas or oil-fired systems.
Date: January 1, 1992
Creator: Litka, A. F.; Breault, R. W. & Balsavich, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Coal-fueled diesel emissions control technology development

Description: The objective of this project is to develop an emissions control system for a GE locomotive powered by a Coal Water Slurry (CWS) fuel diesel engine. The development effort is directed toward reducing particulate matter, SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions from the engine exhaust gas at 700--800F and 1-2 psig. The commercial system should be economically attractive while subject to limited space constraints. After testing various alternatives, a system composed of a barrier filter with sorbent injection ups was selected for controlling particulates, SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions. In bench scale and 500 acfm slip s tests, removal efficiencies greater than 90% for SO{sub 2} and 85% for NO{sub x} were achieved. Particulate emissions from the barrier filter are within NSPS limits.
Date: March 1, 1993
Creator: Cook, C.; Gal, E.; Mengel, M. & Van Kleunen, W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Coal-water slurry fuel combustion testing in an oil-fired industrial boiler. Semiannual technical progress report, August 15, 1993--February 15, 1994

Description: The Pennsylvania State University is conducting a coal-water slurry fuel (CWSF) program with the objective of determining the viability of firing CWSF in an industrial boiler designed for heavy fuel oil. The project will also provide information to help in the design of new systems specifically configured to fire these clean coal-based fuels. The project consists of four phases: (1) design, permitting, and test planning, (2) construction and start up, (3) demonstration and evaluation (1,000-hour demonstration), and (4) expanded demonstration and evaluation (installing a CWSF preparation circuit, conducting an additional 1,000 hours of testing, and installing an advanced flue gas treatment system). The boiler testing and evaluation will determine if the CWSF combustion characteristics, heat release rate, fouling and slagging behavior, corrosion and erosion tendencies, and fuel transport, storage, and handling characteristics can be accommodated in a boiler system designed to fire heavy fuel oil. In addition, the proof-of-concept demonstration will generate data to determine how the properties of a CWSF and its parent coal affect boiler performance. The economic factors associated with retrofitting boilers will also be evaluated. The first demonstrations been completed and the combustion performance of the burner that was provided with the boiler has been determined to be unacceptable. Consequently, the first demonstration has been concluded at 500 hours. The second demonstration will be conducted after a proven CWSF-designed burner is installed on the boiler. During this reporting period, the construction of the fuel preparation facility that will contain the CWSF circuit (as well as a dry, micronized coal circuit) was completed. Proposals from potential suppliers of the flue gas treatment systems were reviewed by Penn State and DOE.
Date: November 30, 1994
Creator: Miller, B. G.; Morrison, J. L.; Poe, R. L. & Scaroni, A. W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Process performance of Ahlstrom Pyroflow PCFB pilot plant

Description: Ahlstrom Pyropower has designed and built a 10 MW{sub th} (34 MMBtu) pressurized circulating fluidized bed (PCFB) pilot plant in Karhula, Finland. The unit is now operating. Data from this unit supports the design of a nominal 80 MW, Des Moines Energy Center 1 (DMEC-1) PCFB Repowering Project. The pilot plant PCFB combustor is of square cross-section. It is housed in a 3.6 m (11.8 ft) diameter pressure vessel. A high pressure high temperature gas cleaning unit downstream of the PCFB exhaust is installed in a separate 2.6 m (8.5 ft) diameter pressure vessel. The maximum plant operating pressure is 16 bar (232 psia). The fuel is fed in slurry form; sorbent is also fed along with the fuel. The net heat input per unit cross section of the combustor is the highest of any known combustion mode. The heat release can go up to 40 MW/m{sup 2} (12.6 MMBtu/ft{sup 2} hr). Many types of coals including high sulfur, bituminous Illinois No. 6 coal and Western sub bituminous, low sulfur Powder River Basin coal were tested. Combustion efficiencies in the range of 99.5 to 99.9% have been consistently observed. Emissions of various gases such as NO{sub x} SO{sub 2} and CO at different operating pressures and loads were monitored. The gas emissions have been lower than expected based on atmospheric circulating fluidized bed boiler experience. The sulfur retention is over 95 % with a Ca/S molar ratio of 1 to 2 for high sulfur Illinois No.6 coal. A GAVS molar ratio of 2.5 to 3.5 was observed to retain 95 % of sulfur with low sulfur Powder River Basin coal. All gaseous emissions during testing with Illinois No. 6 coal and Powder River Basin coal are well within the projected limits for the DMEC1 project. Emission data from tests with ...
Date: May 1, 1993
Creator: Sellakumar, K. M.; Isaksson, J. & Tiensuu, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Advanced coal-fueled gas turbine systems reference system definition update

Description: The objective of the the Direct Coal-Fueled 80 MW Combustion Turbine Program is to establish the technology required for private sector use of an advanced coal-fueled combustion turbine power system. Under this program the technology for a direct coal-fueled 80 MW combustion turbine is to be developed. This unit would be an element in a 207 MW direct coal-fueled combustion turbine combined cycle which includes two combustion turbines, two heat recovery steam generators and a steam turbine. Key to meeting the program objectives is the development of a successful high pressure slagging combustor that burns coal, while removing sulfur, particulates, and corrosive alkali matter from the combustion products. Westinghouse and Textron (formerly AVCO Research Laboratory/Textron) have designed and fabricated a subscale slagging combustor. This slagging combustor, under test since September 1988, has been yielding important experimental data, while having undergone several design iterations.
Date: September 1, 1991
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Spray tip penetration and cone angles for coal-water slurry using a modified medium-speed diesel engine injection system

Description: Experiments have been completed to characterize coal-water slurry sprays from a modified positive displacement fuel injection system of a medium-speed diesel engine. The injection system includes an injection jerk pump driven by an electric motor, a specially designed diaphragm to separate the abrasive coal from the pump, and a single-hole fuel nozzle. The sprays were injected into a pressurized chamber equipped with windows. High speed movies, instantaneous fuel line pressures and needle lifts were obtained. For injection pressures of order 30 MPa, the sprays were similar for coal-water slurry, diesel fuel and water. The time until the center core of the spray broke-up (break-up time) was determined from both the movies and from a correlations using the fuel line pressures. Results from these two independent procedures were in good agreement. For the base case conditions, the break-up time was 0.58 and 0.50 ms for coal-water slurry and diesel fuel, respectively. The break-up times increased with increasing nozzle orifice size and with decreasing chamber density. The break-up time was not a function of coal loading for coal loadings up to 53%. Cone angles of the sprays were dependent on the operating conditions and fluid, as well as on the time and location of the measurement. For the cases studied, the time-averaged cone angles ranged between 10.2 and 17.0{degree}.
Date: December 31, 1992
Creator: Caton, J.a.; Seshadri, A. K. & Kihm, K. D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels. Quarterly report No. 3, November 1989--January 1990

Description: This three-year research project at Combustion Engineering, Inc. (CE), will assess the potential economic and environmental benefits derived from coal beneficiation by various advanced cleaning processes. The objectives of this program include the development of a detailed generic engineering data base, comprised of fuel combustion and ash performance data on beneficiated coal-based fuels (BCFs), which is needed to permit broad application. This technical data base will provide detailed information on fundamental fuel properties influencing combustion and mineral matter behavior as well as quantitative performance data on combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and gaseous and particulate emissions. Program objectives also address the application of this technical data base to predict performance impacts associated with firing BCFs in various commercial boiler designs as well as assessment of the economic implications of BCF utilization. Additionally, demonstration of this technology, with respect to large-scale fuel preparation, firing equipment operation, fuel performance, environmental impacts, and verification of prediction methodology, will be provided during field testing.
Date: March 1, 1990
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Properly synchronized measurements of droplet sizes for high-pressure intermittent coal-water slurry fuel sprays

Description: Experiments were completed to study intermittent coal-water slurry (CWS) fuel sprays injected from an electronically-controlled accumulator injector system. A new synchronization technique was developed using the light extinction signal as a triggering source for the data taking initiation with a laser diffraction particle analyzing (LDPA) technique. This technique allowed measurement of SMDs near the spray tip where the light extinction was low and the data were free from the multiscattering bias. Coal-water slurry fuel with 50% coal loading in mass containing 5 {mu}m mass median diameter coal particulates was considered. A correlation of the SMD with the injection conditions was determined which should show a satisfactory agreement with the measured SMD data. The spray SMD showed an increase with the distance of the axial measurement location and with the ambient gas density, and showed a decrease with increasing injection pressure.
Date: December 31, 1993
Creator: Kihm, K. D.; Terracina, D. P.; Payne, S. E. & Caton, J. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Integrated coal preparation and CWF processing plant: Conceptual design and costing. Final technical report

Description: At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, a study was conducted to provide DOE with a reliable, documented estimate of the cost of producing coal-water fuel (CWF). The approach to the project was to specify a plant capacity and location, identify and analyze a suitable coal, and develop a conceptual design for an integrated coal preparation and CWF processing plant. Using this information, a definitive costing study was then conducted, on the basis of which an economic and sensitivity analysis was performed utilizing a financial evaluation model to determine a price for CWF in 1992. The design output of the integrated plant is 200 tons of coal (dry basis) per hour. Operating at a capacity factor of 83 percent, the baseline design yields approximately 1.5 million tons per year of coal on a dry basis. This is approximately equivalent to the fuel required to continuously generate 500 MW of electric power. The CWF produced by the plant is intended as a replacement for heavy oil or gas in electric utility and large industrial boilers. The particle size distribution, particularly the top size, and the ash content of the coal in the CWF are specified at significantly lower levels than is commonly found in typical pulverized coal grinds. The particle top size is 125 microns (vs typically 300m{mu} for pulverized coal) and the coal ash content is 3.8 percent. The lower top size is intended to promote complete carbon burnout at less derating in boilers that are not designed for coal firing. The reduced mineral matter content will produce ash of very fine particle size during combustion, which leads to less impaction and reduced fouling of tubes in convective passages.
Date: December 1, 1992
Creator: McHale, E. T.; Paul, A. D.; Bartis, J. T. & Korkmaz, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development and testing of a commercial-scale coal-fired combustion system, Phase 3. Quarterly technical progress report No. 2, January 1, 1991--March 31, 1991

Description: Within the commercial sector, oil and natural gas are the predominant fuels used to meet the space-heating needs of schools, office buildings, apartment complexes, and other similar structures. In general, these buildings require firing rates of 1 to 10 million Btu/hr. The objective of this program is to demonstrate the technical and economic viability of a coal-fired combustion system for this sector. The commercial-scale coal-water slurry (CWS)-fired space heating system will be a scale-up of a CWS-fired residential warm-air heating system developed by Tecogen under contract to the Department of Energy, Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center. This system included a patented nonslagging combustor known as IRIS, for Inertial Reactor with Internal Separation. This combustion technology, which has demonstrated high combustion efficiency using CWS fuels at input rates of 100,000 Btu/hr, will be scaled to operate at 2 to 5 millon Btu/hr. Along with the necessary fuel storage and delivery, heat recovery, and control equipment, the system will include pollution control devices to meet targeted values of NO{sub x}, S0{sub 2}, and particulate emissions. In general, the system will be designed to match the reliability, safety, turndown, and ignition performance of gas or oil-fired systems.
Date: July 1, 1991
Creator: Litka, A. F. & Breault, R. W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch synthesis: Cobalt plus a water-gas shift catalyst, January 1, 1990--March 30, 1990

Description: Experiments to study cobalt-catalyzed reactions of light 1-alkenes added to synthesis gas feed have been performed. Data have been collected at 220{degrees}C, 0.45 to 1.48 MPa and a synthesis gas flow rate between 0.015 and 0.030 Nl/(gcatmin) with H{sub 2}/CO of 1.45 to 2.25. C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, C{sub 3}H{sub 6}, and C{sub 4}H{sub 8} were added to the synthesis gas feed in concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 1.2 mole% of total feed. For each material balance in which 1-alkenes were added, a material balance was performed at similar process conditions without 1-alkenes added. This use of ``base case`` process conditions should make data analysis and interpretation easier. Material balances without 1-alkenes were also repeated to allow verification of catalyst selectivity stability. A total of 49 balances were performed during a single run which lasted over 2500 hours-on-stream. The hydrocarbon data have not yet been completed analyzed.
Date: December 31, 1990
Creator: Yates, I. C. & Satterfield, C. N.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

STUDY OF REMOTE MILITARY POWER APPLICATIONS. REPORT NO. 12. EVALUATION AND SELECTION OF APPLICABLE REACTOR CONCEPTS

Description: An evaluation of the reactor concepts under consideration for remote military power plants is presented. The concepts include water-cooled and - moderated reactors, both direct and indirect cycle. organic-cooled and -moderated reactors, heavy-water-cooled and -moderated reactors. gas-cooled reactors, sodium- cooled graphite-moderated reactors, fast reactors, and fluid-fuel reactors. The limitations and advantages, technological status, economics, and future potential of each reactor are reviewed. From the reviews it is concluded that direct-cycle boiling-water and pressurized-water reactors are most suitable for applications requiring power before 1965. (C.J.G.)
Date: January 1, 1960
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Civilian Power Reactor Program. Part 3. Book 3. Status Report on Aqueous Homogeneous Reactors as of 1959

Description: The status of a program to develop a thermal breeder power reactor which is based on the Th-U/sup 233/ cycle is discussed. The general characteristics of two-region power breeder reactors which are either solution-core slurryblanket or slurry-core slurry-blanket are described. A review of studies on corrosion, physical properties, and metallurgy of fuel materials, in particular aqueous ThO/ sub 2/ suspensions, is presented. Development studies on cladding alloys are discussed. The processing of fuel and blanket materials for removal of fission and corrosion products and recovery of fissionable material is discussed. A flowsheet for the preparation of ThO/sub 2/ slurries is contained. Development studies on reactor components, systems, instrumentation, and control are reviewed. Reactor-control, safety, and criticality studies are discusspd. (C.J.G.)
Date: January 1, 1960
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Storage, transportation, and atomization of CWF for residential applications

Description: This project investigated the properties and behavior with regard to handling, storage, and atomization in small-scale applications of different CWFs (coal water fuels) prepared from different parent coals and various beneficiation techniques as well as consideration for bulk storage and distribution. The CWFs that were prepared included Upper Elkhorn No. 3, Illinois No. 6, and Upper Wyodak coal cleaned by heavy media separation. Also, several CWFs were prepared with Upper Elkhorn No. 3 coal cleaned by heavy media separation with filtration, chemical cleaning, oil agglomeration, and froth flotation.
Date: November 1, 1991
Creator: Grimanis, M.P.; Breault, R.W. (TECOGEN, Inc., Waltham, MA (United States)); Smit, F.J. & Jha, M.C. (AMAX Research and Development Center, Golden, CO (United States))
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Basic combustion and pollutant-formation processes for pulverized fuels. Quarterly technical progress report No. 4, 1 July 1981-30 September 1981

Description: This contract study of basic combustion and pollutant formation processes for pulverized solid fossil fuels includes coal-water mixtures and chars derived from coal pyrolysis, liquefaction or gasification processes. The factors that affect the physical properties of coal-water mixtures (CWM) have been identified and characterization tests initiated to determine how these variables (e.g., solids loading, particle size, particle size distribution, additives) affect the coal slurries. A bench-scale apparatus consisting of a pressure vessel and an atomizing nozzle was designed and is being fabricated. This apparatus will assist in the development of handling and atomization techniques for the combustion tests. It will also aid in comparing viscosities of slurries of different solids loadings and coal types. Chars were obtained for characterization tests. A series of potential tests to characterize the chars was identified. Grading and sizing of the chars was begun as well as elemental analysis. Samples of the chars were sent to Phillips for CO/sub 2/ reactivity tests to be performed. Coding for incorporation of swirling flows into the two-dimensional coal combustion model (PCGC-2) was completed. Debugging was initiated and sample computations are performed for a gaseous, isothermal system for low swirl numbers. Convergence problems were encountered when attempts were made to complete runs at higher swirl numbers.
Date: October 15, 1981
Creator: Germane, G.J. & Smoot, L.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Storage, transportation, and atomization of CWF for residential applications

Description: The properties and behavior with regard to handling, storage, and atomization in small-scale applications of different coal-water fuels (CWFs) prepared from different parent coals and various beneficiation techniques, were investigated. The CWFs that were prepared included Upper Elkhorn No. 3, Illinois No. 6, and Upper Wyodak coal cleaned by heavy media separation. Also, several CWFs were prepared with Upper Elkhorn No. 3 coal cleaned by heavy media separation with filtration, chemical cleaning, oil agglomeration, and froth flotation. Pressure drop measurements in tubes and viscometer measurements were used to construct rheograms of the seven CWFs that were prepared for shear rates up to 1000 1/s. Analysis of each CWF included proximate, ultimate and ash fusion temperatures. A fully automatic demonstration storage facility was designed and fabricated. The viscosity at higher shear rates (150,000 1/s) will be measured in a capillary viscometer to determine the viscosity at shear rate typically obtained with atomizers. The demonstration storage/handling facility will be tested. A cost analysis of a residential facility will be conducted. The seven CWFs will be burned in the residential combustor developed by Tecogen under contract DE-AC22-87PC79650. 41 figs., 12 tabs.
Date: June 1, 1991
Creator: Grimanis, M.P. & Breault, R.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Operation, modification, and maintenance of DOE/PETC 700 H. P. combustion test facility. Quarterly activity report, April 2-July 1, 1979, second quarter

Description: The coal-oil mixture (COM) combustion test program of the 700 H.P. Combustion Test Facility has been performed successfully according to schedule. The parametric coal-oil mixture combustion tests with 30 and 40% coal concentrations were completed. Test data are being analyzed; some meaningful results were obtained. The combustor tests with 50% coal concentration have been initiated. The installation of the new 100 H.P., oil-fired, fire tube boiler for COM combustion studies is on schedule and facility shake down tests are scheduled.
Date: January 1, 1979
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department