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Research on human genetics in Iceland. Progress report

Description: Records of the Icelandic Population are being used to investigate the possible inheritance of disabilities and diseases as well as other characters and the effect of environment on man. The progress report of research covers the period 1977 to 1980. The investigation was begun in 1965 by the Genetical Committee of the University of Iceland and the materials used are demographic records from the year 1840 to present and various medical information. The records are being computerized and linked together to make them effective for use in hereditary studies.
Date: October 31, 1980
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Progress report on research on human genetics in Iceland

Description: Records of the Icelandic population are being used to investigate the possible inheritance of disabilities and diseases as well as other characteristics and the effect of environment on man. The progress report of research covers the period from 1977 to 1980. The investigation was begun in 1965 by the Genetical Committee of the University of Iceland and the materials used are demographic records from the year 1840 to present and various medical information. The records are being computerized and linked together to make them effective for use in hereditary studies.
Date: October 31, 1980
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

[News Clip: Hypertension #3]

Description: Video footage from the KXAS-TV/NBC station in Fort Worth, Texas, to accompany a news story. This story aired at 5:00 P.M.
Date: May 10, 1978
Creator: KXAS-TV (Television station : Fort Worth, Tex.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

Diagnostic and therapeutic applications of diode lasers and solid state lasers in medicine

Description: The Texas Medical Center in Houston and the nearby UT Medical Branch at Galveston together constitute a major center of medical research activities. Laser applications in medicine are under development with the engineering assistance of the colloborating engineering centers at Rice University, UT-Austin, and Texas A M Univ. In addition, this collective is collaborating with the Naval Research Laboratory, where new developments in laser design are underway, in order to transfer promising new laser technology rapidly into the medical environment.
Date: May 1, 1992
Creator: Jacques, S.L. (Texas Univ., Houston, TX (United States). Cancer Center); Welch, A.J. (Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States)); Motamedi, M. (Texas Univ., Galveston, TX (United States). Medical Branch); Rastegar, S. (Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)); Tittel, F. (Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States)) & Esterowitz, L. (Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States))
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

New Compton densitometer for measuring pulmonary edema

Description: Pulmonary edema is the pathological increase of extravascular lung water found most often in patients with congestive heart failure and other critically ill patients who suffer from intravenous fluid overload. A non-invasive lung density monitor that is accurate, easily portable, safe and inexpensive is needed for clinical evaluation of pulmonary edema. Other researchers who have employed Compton scattering techniques generally used systems of extended size and detectors with poor energy resolution. This has resulted in significant systematic biases from multiply-scattered photons and larger errors in counting statistics at a given radiation dose to the patient. We are proposing a patented approach in which only backscattered photons are measured with a high-resolution HPGe detector in a compact system geometry. By proper design and a unique data extraction scheme, effects of the variable chest wall on lung density measurements are minimized. Preliminary test results indicate that with a radioactive source of under 30 GBq, it should be possible to make an accurate lung density measurement in one minute, with a risk of radiation exposure to the patient a thousand times smaller than that from a typical chest x-ray. The ability to make safe, frequent lung density measurements could be very helpful for monitoring the course of P.E. at the hospital bedside or outpatient clinics, and for evaluating the efficacy of therapy in clinical research. 6 refs., 5 figs.
Date: October 1, 1985
Creator: Loo, B.W.; Goulding, F.S. & Simon, D.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Evaluation of ischemia and myocardial viability in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) with iodine-123-labeled 15-(p-iodophenyl)-3-R,S-methylpentadecanoic acid (BMIPP)

Description: Twenty patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) controlled by coronary arteriography (CA) and biplane left ventricular cineventriculography (LVCV) were investigated with the 15- (p[I-123]iodophenyl)-3-R,S-methylpentadecanoic acid (BMIPP) fatty acid analogue. During maximal symptom limited exercise 5 mCi (200 MBq) of BMIPP were injected followed by two SPECT studies within three hours. After another 30 min, with the patient at rest a third SPECT was performed after reinjection of 3 mCi (100 MBq) BMIPP. Visual inspection of the short and long axis slices and quantitative comparison of the short axis slices of the tomograms were performed to grade BMIPP uptake and refill and detect turnover abnormalities. These were addressed either as scar or as ischemia and compared to CA and a graded score of regional wall motion by LVCV which provided values for sensitivity (SE) and specificity (SP) to detect CAD. Fifteen infarctions had corresponded clinical, angiographic and scintigraphic findings in 93%.
Date: October 1, 1993
Creator: Kropp, J.; Joergens, M.; Glaenzer, K. P.; Luederitz, B.; Biersack, H. J. & Knapp, F. F. Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The development of iodine-123-methyl-branched fatty acids and their applications in nuclear cardiology

Description: Continued Interest in the use of iodine-1 23-labeled fatty acids for myocardial Imaging results from observations from a variety of studies that in many types of cardiac disease, regional fatty acid myocardial uptake patterns are often different than regional distribution of flow tracers. These differences may reflect alterations in important parameters of metabolism which can be useful for patient management or therapeutic strategy decision making. In addition, use of iodine-I 23-labeled fatty acid distribution may represent a unique metabolic probe to relate some aspects of the metabolism of these substrates with the regional viability of cardiac tissue. The use of such viability markers could provide important prognostic information on myocardial salvage, helping to identify patients for revascularization or angioplasty. Clinical studies are currently in progress with the iodine-123-labeled 1 5-(p-iodophenyl)-3-R,S-methylpentadecanoic acid (BMIPP) fatty acid analogue at several institutions. The goals of this paper are to discuss development of the concept of metabolic trapping of fatty acids, to briefly review development and evaluation of various radioiodinated methyl-branched fatty acids and to discuss recent patient studies with iodine-123 (BMIPP) using single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT).
Date: June 1, 1993
Creator: Knapp, F. F. Jr.; Ambrose, K. R.; Kropp, J.; Biersack, H. J.; Goodman, M. M.; Franken, P. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

[Non-invasive evaluation of the cardiac autonomic nervous system by PET]. Progress report, September 1991--September 1992

Description: The proposed research addresses the development, validation and application of cardiac PET imaging techniques to characterize the autonomic nervous system of the heart. PET technology has significantly matured over the last two decades. Instrument design, image processing and production of radiochemical compounds have formed an integrative approach to provide a powerful and novel imaging modality for the quantitative in vivo evaluation of the autonomic nervous system of the heart. Animal studies using novel tracers for the sympathetic and parasympathetic nerve terminals will be employed to characterize the functional integrity of nerve terminals. This work will be complemented by the development of agents which bind to postsynaptic receptor sites. The combined evaluation of presynaptic and postsynaptic neuronal function will allow a unique characterization of neuronal function. Initial development in animal studies will be followed by feasibility studies in humans. These studies are designed to test sophisticated imaging protocols in the human heart and validate the scintigraphic findings with independent markers of autonomic innervation. Subsequent clinical application in various cardiac diseases is expected to provide new insights into the neuropathophysiology of the heart.
Date: September 1, 1992
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Myocardial uptake of cocaine and effects of cocaine on myocardial substrate utilization and perfusion in hypertensive rats

Description: Cocaine abuse is a problem causing world-wide concern and the number of deaths following cocaine use is increasing. Cardiovascular complications following cocaine include severe tachyarrythmias, pulmonary edema, myocardial infarction, and acute renal failure, which are major problems confronting emergency facilities. While the studies of cocaine effects on the brain have been given the most attention, it is clear that the effects of cocaine on the cardiovascular system are of great importance, given the increasing number of reports on sudden death and myocardial infarctions in young adults related to cocaine use. The precise mechanisms of cardiotoxic actions of cocaine are unclear. We investigated the whole-body distribution of C-14-labeled cocaine to determine the cocaine-binding sites, including blocking experiments to determine the nature of regional binding sites, and differential response of the normal vs. diseased heart (hypertensive cardiomyopathy) in an animal model to mimic a potentially high risk population. We investigated the acute effects of cocaine on myocardial metabolism using two myocardial energy substrate analogs, fatty acid and glucose with comparison with regional perfusion.
Date: December 31, 1992
Creator: Som, P.; Wang, G. J.; Oster, Z. H.; Knapp, F. F. Jr.; Yonekura, Y.; Fujibayashi, Y. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Institutional Plan FY 1987-1992

Description: The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy, provides national scientific leadership and supports technological innovation through its mission to: (1) Perform leading multidisciplinary research in general sciences and energy sciences; (2) Develop and operate unique national experimental facilities for use by qualified investigators; (3) Educate and train future generations of scientists and engineers; and (4) Foster productive relationships between LBL research programs and industry. The following areas of research excellence implement this mission and provide current focus for achieving DOE goals. GENERAL SCIENCES--(1) Accelerator and Fusion Research--accelerator design and operation, advanced accelerator technology development, accelerator and ion source research for heavy-ion fusion and magnetic fusion, and x-ray optics; (2) Nuclear Science--relativistic heavy-ion physics, medium- and low-energy nuclear physics, nuclear theory, nuclear astrophysics, nuclear chemistry, transuranium elements studies, nuclear data evaluation, and detector development; (3) Physics--experimental and theoretical particle physics, detector development, astrophysics, and applied mathematics. ENERGY SCIENCES--(1) Applied Science--building energy efficiency, solar for building systems, fossil energy conversion, energy storage, and atmospheric effects of combustion; (2) Biology and Medicine--molecular and cellular biology, diagnostic imaging, radiation biophysics, therapy and radiosurgery, mutagenesis and carcinogenesis, lipoproteins, cardiovascular disease, and hemopoiesis research; (3) Center for Advanced Materials--catalysts, electronic materials, ceramic and metal interfaces, polymer research, instrumentation, and metallic alloys; (4) Chemical Biodynamics--molecular biology of nucleic acids and proteins, genetics of photosynthesis, and photochemistry; (5) Earth Sciences--continental lithosphere properties, structures and behavior, and transport processes in geologic systems; and (6) Materials and Molecular Research--microstructures, electron microscopy, surfaces, and interfaces; solid-state and atomic physics; chemical energy, chemical physics, and reaction dynamics. Research and support activities conducted by LBL's Information and Computing Sciences and Engineering Divisions are central to the achievement of DOE goals. These divisions provide essential computational, instrumentation, and fabrication capability that strengthen the unique role of ...
Date: December 1, 1986
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Comparison of positron tomography and scintigraphy with $sup 201$Tl for delineation of the myocardium

Description: Recent advances in nuclear medicine instrumentation have led to the development of improved positron-imaging systems which exceed in performance the earlier systems which were limited mainly by low count rate capability. This has led to renewed interest in positron imaging in general, primarily because such devices offer better resolution and higher sensitivity than conventional, mechanically collimated gamma cameras, as well as tomographic capability which may provide additional and more accurate information for the clinician. Furthermore, the unique capabilities of positrons for use in reconstructive imaging are beginning to be exploited. In the present report, results are presented from a preliminary study in which longitudinal tomographic myocardial images, produced with $sup 81$Rb as the positron-emitting label using the double camera coincidence system are compared with conventional myocardial images obtained with $sup 201$Tl and a gamma camera. (auth)
Date: January 1, 1976
Creator: Fill, H.; Buchin, M.; Harper, P.V.; Muehllehner, G.; Walsh, W.; Resnekov, L. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Emission computed tomography: a new technique for the quantitative physiologic study of brain and heart in vivo

Description: Emission computed tomography can provide a quantitative in vivo measurement of regional tissue radionuclide tracer concentrations. This facility when combined with physiologic models and radioactively labeled physiologic tracers that behave in a predictable manner allow measurement of a wide variety of physiologic variables. This integrated technique has been referred to as Physiologic Tomography (PT). PT requires labeled compounds which trace physiologic processes in a known and predictable manner, and physiologic models which are appropriately formulated and validated to derive physiologic variables from ECT data. In order to effectively achieve this goal, PT requires an ECT system that is capable of performing truly quantitative or analytical measurements of tissue tracer concentrations and which has been well characterized in terms of spatial resolution, sensitivity and signal to noise ratios in the tomographic image. This paper illustrates the capabilities of emission computed tomography and provides examples of physiologic tomography for the regional measurement of cerebral and myocardial metabolic rate for glucose, regional measurement of cerebral blood volume, gated cardiac blood pools and capillary perfusion in brain and heart. Studies on patients with stroke and myocardial ischemia are also presented.
Date: January 1, 1978
Creator: Phelps, M.E.; Hoffman, E.J.; Huang, S.C.; Schelbert, H.R. & Kuhl, D.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Platelet thrombosis in cardiac-valve prostheses

Description: The contribution of platelets and clotting factors in thrombosis on cardiovascular prostheses had been quantified with several tracers. Thrombus formation in vivo could be measured semiquantitatively in animal models and patients with indium-111, Technetium-99m labeled platelets, iodine-123, iodine-131 labeled fibrinogen, and In-111 and Tc-99m labeled antibody to the fibrinogen-receptor on the platelet- membrane, or fibrin. The early studies demonstrated that certain platelet-inhibitors, e.g. sulfinpyrazone, aspirin or aspirin- persantine increased platelet survival time with mechanical valves implanted in the baboon model and patients. Thrombus localization by imaging is possible for large thrombus on thrombogenic surface of prosthesis in the acute phase. The majority of thrombus was found in the sewing ring (Dacron) in the acute phase in both the mechanical and tissue valves. The amount of retained thrombus in both mechanical and tissue valves in our one-day study in the dog model was similar (< 1% if injected In-111 platelets = 5 billion platelets). As the fibrous ingrowth covered the sewing ring, the thrombus formation decreased significantly. Only a small amount of thrombus was found on the leaflets at one month in both the dog and calf models. 38 refs., 9 figs., 5 tabs.
Date: January 1, 1989
Creator: Dewanjee, M.K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Consistency of reported health effects of air pollution

Description: Three different studies have considered the relation between various mortality rates and air pollution levels. this paper evaluates the consistency of these studies and finds some evidence of a constant proportional effect on both males and females. Two of the studies indicate a relation between air pollution and total mortality rate but differ in the estimate of the effect by a factor of fifteen. The studies generally find little relation between pollution and lung diseases and lung cancer; they disagree on heart disease and total cancer findings.
Date: unknown
Creator: Finch, S J & Morris, S C
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Studies defining interactions between hypertension and air pollutants

Description: An animal model of hypertension was developed by breeding two lines of rats. The model was used to investigate interactions between commonly encountered air pollutants and the development of hypertension. This paper summarizes studies of the interaction of sulfur dioxide and ozone with the models. (ACR)
Date: January 1, 1980
Creator: Drew, R T; Costa, D L; Haber, S & Iwai, J
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Multi-element silicon detector for x-ray flux measurements

Description: A 30-element Si(Li) detector has been fabricated to measure the one-dimensional flux profile of 33 KeV x-rays from a synchrotron radiation beam. The device, which is fabricated from a single 39 mm x 15 mm silicon wafer, is a linear array of 0.9 mm x 7 mm elements with a 1 mm center-to-center spacing. It is 5 mm thick and when operated at room temperature has an average leakage current of 10 nA/element. The x-ray flux in each element is determined by measuring the current with a high quality operational amplifier followed by a current digitizer. This detector is being used to study the use of synchrotron radiation for non-invasive imaging of coronary arteries. The experiment uses the difference in the transmitted flux of a monochromatized x-ray beam above and below the iodine K-edge. Measurements have been made on plastic phantoms and on excised animal hearts with iodinated arteries. The images obtained indicate that a 256-element device with similar properties, but with 0.6 mm element spacing, will make a very effective detector for high-speed medical imaging.
Date: October 1, 1981
Creator: Thompson, A.C.; Goulding, F.S.; Sommer, H.A.; Walton, J.T.; Hughes, E.B.; Rolfe, J. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Physiopathology of blood platelets and development of platelets substitutes. Progress report, August 1, 1976--October 31, 1977. [/sup 51/Cr]

Description: Progress is reported on the following research projects: the effect of estrogen on platelet aggregability and thrombus formation; the antithrombotic effect of platelet inhibiting agents in a bench model of artificial kidney; the arrest of hemorrhage in severely alloimmunized thrombocytopenic patients; and in vivo elution of /sup 51/Cr from labeled platelets induced by antibody. (HLW)
Date: July 31, 1977
Creator: Baldini, M G
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Applications of CdTe to nuclear medicine. Annual report, February 1, 1979-January 31, 1980

Description: The application of CdTe gamma detectors in nuclear medicine is reported on. An internal probe was developed which can be inserted into the heart to measure the efficiency of various radiopharmaceuticals in the treatment of heart attacks. A second application is an array of detectors which is light enough to be worn by ambulatory patients and can measure the change in cardiac output over an eight hour period during heart attack treatment. The instrument includes an on board tape recorder. (ACR)
Date: January 1, 1980
Creator: Entine, G
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Lipids: Part of the tangled web

Description: Analysis of LDL subclasses by non-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis has led to the identification of a subclass pattern characterized by predominance of small LDL, designated LDL subclass pattern B. The prevalence of pattern B in the general population is approximately 25%, but varies as a function of age and gender, being relatively uncommon in children and in premenopausal women. The remainder of the population has a predominance of larger LDL (pattern A) or an intermediate pattern. Our findings indicate that LDL subclass pattern B is an integral part of the tangled web'' of interrelated coronary disease risk factors associated with insulin resistance. It may be that the pathologic features of this lipoprotein profile, including the relative atherogenicity of small, dense LDL and IDL, contribute importantly to the increased risk of cardiovascular disease in subjects with insulin resistance and hypertension. Furthermore, pattern B serves as a marker for a common genetic trait which may underlie a substantial portion of the familial predisposition to coronary artery disease in the general population. Studies of hormonal, dietary, and pharmacologic influences on expression of this atherogenic phenotype should lead to more effective identification and management of high-risk individuals, and improved approaches to disease prevention in high-risk families.
Date: August 1, 1992
Creator: Krauss, R.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Microimaging studies of myocardial substrate utilization and perfusion in two models of non-coronary heart disease

Description: We have studied two animal models of non-coronary heart disease. The salt-sensitive Dahl strain hypertensive rats and their genetically matched normotensive controls and the cardiomyopathic BIO 53.58 (CM) strain Syrian hamsters with age and sex-matched RB strain controls. The CM strain hamster seems to be a very good model of human congestive cardiomyopathy and the Dahl strain hypertensive rats have also been found to be good models for studying the effects of hypertension on the myocardium. In our studies we compared the utilization of various metabolic substrates, viz., fatty acids, glucose analogs, and the early distribution of /sup 201/Tl, as an indicator of myocardial flow. The routine studies involving dissection of animals for assaying the radioactivity following the injection of radiopharmaceuticals is not suitable for assessing regional changes in metabolism and flow. The use of quantitative autoradiographic microimaging (ARG) enables the visualization of discrete regional as well as global changes from normal and to quantitate them. This paper describes the methodology and results of these investigations. 14 refs., 5 figs.
Date: January 1, 1987
Creator: Som, P.; Oster, Z.H. & Knapp, F.F. Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Geochemistry of water in relation to cardiovascular disease

Description: Relations between trace and major element chemistry of drinking water and cardiovascular diseases are reviewed and documented. Several aspects of the problem, related both to the pathway that drinking water takes to man and to its transit through man, are reviewed. Several steps in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease that could be affected by water factors were explored. There is little evidence bearing on the contribution from drinking water to human tissue levels of cadmium, chromium, or zinc. Copper and magnesium levels of tissues may be related to drinking water, but confirmatory evidence is needed. Lead levels in blood and other tissues are most certainly affected by lead levels in drinking water in areas where these levels are unusually elevated. There is little evidence that relatively low levels of lead are toxic to the cardiovascular system, except for the causation of cardiomyopathy. The protective action of selenium and zinc applies mainly to cadmium toxicity. The mode of the protective action of silicon, if any, is unclear at present. Some epidemiological associations between the cadmium level or cadmium:zinc ratio and cardiovascular disease have been reported, but are contradictory. Some epidemiological support exists for a protective effect by selenium; results for zinc are equivocal. Interactions within the human system involving calcium and selected trace elements might be very important for the cardiovascular system. Review of the epidemiological literature indicates that there may be a water factor associated with cardiovascular disease. Its effects, if any, must be very weak in comparison with the effects of known risk factors. The reported inverse relationship between mortality from cardiovascular diseases and hardness of local drinking water supplies appears to be considerably less distinctive in small regional studies. (ERB)
Date: January 1, 1979
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The development of iodine-123-methyl-branched fatty acids and their applications in nuclear cardiology

Description: Continued Interest in the use of iodine-1 23-labeled fatty acids for myocardial Imaging results from observations from a variety of studies that in many types of cardiac disease, regional fatty acid myocardial uptake patterns are often different than regional distribution of flow tracers. These differences may reflect alterations in important parameters of metabolism which can be useful for patient management or therapeutic strategy decision making. In addition, use of iodine-I 23-labeled fatty acid distribution may represent a unique metabolic probe to relate some aspects of the metabolism of these substrates with the regional viability of cardiac tissue. The use of such viability markers could provide important prognostic information on myocardial salvage, helping to identify patients for revascularization or angioplasty. Clinical studies are currently in progress with the iodine-123-labeled 1 5-(p-iodophenyl)-3-R,S-methylpentadecanoic acid (BMIPP) fatty acid analogue at several institutions. The goals of this paper are to discuss development of the concept of metabolic trapping of fatty acids, to briefly review development and evaluation of various radioiodinated methyl-branched fatty acids and to discuss recent patient studies with iodine-123 (BMIPP) using single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT).
Date: January 1, 1993
Creator: Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Ambrose, K.R. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Kropp, J.; Biersack, H.J. (Bonn Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Klinische und Experimentelle Nuklearmedizin); Goodman, M.M. (University of Tennessee Medical Center, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Radiology); Franken, P. (Free Univ. Hospital, Brussels (Belgium). Nuclear Medicine Dept.) et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Genetic influence on brain catecholamines: high brain norepinephrine in salt-sensitive rats

Description: Rats genetically sensitive to salt-induced hypertension evinced higher levels of plasma norepinephrine and epinephrine than rats genetically resistant to hypertension. The hypertension-sensitive rats showed higher hypothalamic norepinephrine and lower epinephrine than resistant rats. In response to a high salt diet, brain stem norepinephrine increased in sensitive rats while resistant rats exhibited a decrease on the same diet.
Date: January 1, 1980
Creator: Iwai, J; Friedman, R & Tassinari, L
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department