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Final Technical Report for DOE Award DE-FG02-07ER64403 [Modeling of Microbially Induced Calcite Precipitation for the Immobilization of Strontium-90 Using a Variable Velocity Streamtube Ensemble]

Description: Biogeochemical modeling using PHREEQC2 and a streamtube ensemble approach is utilized to understand a well-to-well subsurface treatment system at the Vadose Zone Research Park (VZRP) near Idaho Falls, Idaho. Treatment involves in situ microbially-mediated ureolysis to induce calcite precipitation for the immobilization of strontium-90. PHREEQC2 is utilized to model the kinetically-controlled ureolysis and consequent calcite precipitation. Reaction kinetics, equilibrium phases, and cation exchange are used within PHREEQC2 to track pH and levels of calcium, ammonium, urea, and calcite precipitation over time, within a series of one-dimensional advective-dispersive transport paths creating a streamtube ensemble representation of the well-to-well transport. An understanding of the impact of physical heterogeneities within this radial flowfield is critical for remediation design; we address this via the streamtube approach: instead of depicting spatial extents of solutes in the subsurface we focus on their arrival distribution at the control well(s). Traditionally, each streamtube maintains uniform velocity; however in radial flow in homogeneous media, the velocity within any given streamtube is spatially-variable in a common way, being highest at the input and output wells and approaching a minimum at the midpoint between the wells. This idealized velocity variability is of significance in the case of ureolytically driven calcite precipitation. Streamtube velocity patterns for any particular configuration of injection and withdrawal wells are available as explicit calculations from potential theory, and also from particle tracking programs. To approximate the actual spatial distribution of velocity along streamtubes, we assume idealized radial non-uniform velocity associated with homogeneous media. This is implemented in PHREEQC2 via a non-uniform spatial discretization within each streamtube that honors both the streamtube’s travel time and the idealized “fast-slow-fast” pattern of non-uniform velocity along the streamline. Breakthrough curves produced by each simulation are weighted by the path-respective flux fractions (obtained by deconvolution of tracer tests conducted at the VZRP) ...
Date: August 26, 2013
Creator: Ginn, Timothy R. & Weathers, Tess
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Collaborative Research: Towards Advanced Understanding and Predictive Capability of Climate Change in the Arctic using a High-Resolution Regional Arctic Climate System Model

Description: Primary activities are reported in these areas: climate system component studies via one-way coupling experiments; development of the Regional Arctic Climate System Model (RACM); and physical feedback studies focusing on changes in Arctic sea ice using the fully coupled model.
Date: April 8, 2013
Creator: Lettenmaier, Dennis P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Reaction-based Transport Modeling of Iron Reduction and Uranium Immobilization at Area 2 of the NABIR Field Research Center

Description: This research sought to examine biogeochemical processes likely to take place in the less conductive materials above and below the gravel during the in situ ethanol biostimulation experiment conducted at Area 2 during 2005-2006. The in situ experiment in turn examined the hypothesis that injection of electron donor into this layer would induce formation of a redox barrier in the less conductive materials, resulting in decreased mass transfer of uranium out these materials and attendant declines in groundwater U(VI) concentration. Our project focuses on the development of a mechanistic understanding and quantitative models of coupled Fe(III)/U(VI) reduction in FRC Area 2 sediments. This report summarizes research activities conducted at The University of Central Florida (2004-2007), the development of biogeochemical and reactive transport models and the conduction of numerical simulations at laboratory, column, and field scales.
Date: December 21, 2007
Creator: Tsyh Yeh, Gour
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Elk Monitoring Report for Calendar Year 2012

Description: Four complete surveys were conducted during 2012. The surveys were conducted on April 5, June 19, October 25, and December 18. During the first survey, conducted on April 5, the aerial survey crew detected 26 elk while the ground survey crew detected zero. For the June 19 survey, the aerial survey detected four elk not detected by the ground crew, while the ground crew detected 13 elk not detected by the aerial crew. A total of 17 elk were detected on June 19, 2012. On October 25, surveyors detected two herds of elk. Both the aerial and ground crews detected one herd of six, while only the ground crew detected the other herd of four. No elk were observed during the final survey, conducted on December 18.
Date: March 12, 2013
Creator: Lindsey, Cole T.; Nugent, John J.; Wilde, Justin W. & Tiller, B
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

ENVIRONMENTAL BASELINE SURVEY REPORT FOR WEST BLACK OAK RIDGE, EAST BLACK OAK RIDGE, MCKINNEY RIDGE, WEST PINE RIDGE, AND PARCEL 21D IN THE VICINITY OF THE EAST TENNESSEE TECHNOLOGY PARK, OAK RIDGE, TENNESSEE

Description: This environmental baseline survey (EBS) report documents the baseline environmental conditions of five land parcels located near the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), including West Black Oak Ridge, East Black Oak Ridge, McKinney Ridge, West Pine Ridge, and Parcel 21d. The goal is to obtain all media no-further-investigation (NFI) determinations for the subject parcels considering existing soils. To augment the existing soils-only NFI determinations, samples of groundwater, surface water, soil, and sediment were collected to support all media NFI decisions. The only updates presented here are those that were made after the original issuance of the NFI documents. In the subject parcel where the soils NFI determination was not completed for approval (Parcel 21d), the full process has been performed to address the soils as well. Preparation of this report included the detailed search of federal government records, title documents, aerial photos that may reflect prior uses, and visual inspections of the property and adjacent properties. Interviews with current employees involved in, or familiar with, operations on the real property were also conducted to identify any areas on the property where hazardous substances and petroleum products, or their derivatives, and acutely hazardous wastes may have been released or disposed. In addition, a search was made of reasonably obtainable federal, state, and local government records of each adjacent facility where there has been a release of any hazardous substance or any petroleum product or their derivatives, including aviation fuel and motor oil, and which is likely to cause or contribute to a release of any hazardous substance or any petroleum product or its derivatives, including aviation fuel or motor oil, on the real property. A radiological survey and soil/sediment sampling was conducted to assess baseline conditions of Parcel 21d that were not addressed by the soils-only ...
Date: November 29, 2012
Creator: King, David A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Exposure Evaluation for Benzene, Lead and Noise in Vehicle and Equipment Repair Shops

Description: An exposure assessment was performed at the equipment and vehicle maintenance repair shops operating at the U. S. Department of Energy Hanford site, in Richland, Washington. The maintenance shops repair and maintain vehicles and equipment used in support of the Hanford cleanup mission. There are three general mechanic shops and one auto body repair shop. The mechanics work on heavy equipment used in construction, cranes, commercial motor vehicles, passenger-type vehicles in addition to air compressors, generators, and farm equipment. Services include part fabrication, installation of equipment, repair and maintenance work in the engine compartment, and tire and brake services. Work performed at the auto body shop includes painting and surface preparation which involves applying body filler and sanding. 8-hour time-weighted-average samples were collected for benzene and noise exposure and task-based samples were collected for lead dust work activities involving painted metal surfaces. Benzene samples were obtained using 3M™ 3520 sampling badges and were analyzed for additional volatile organic compounds. These compounds were selected based on material safety data sheet information for the aerosol products used by the mechanics for each day of sampling. The compounds included acetone, ethyl ether, toluene, xylene, VM&P naphtha, methyl ethyl ketone, and trichloroethylene. Laboratory data for benzene, VM&P naphtha, methyl ethyl ketone and trichloroethylene were all below the reporting detection limit. Airborne concentrations for acetone, ethyl ether, toluene and xylene were all less than 10% of their occupational exposure limit. The task-based samples obtained for lead dusts were submitted for a metal scan analysis to identify other metals that might be present. Laboratory results for lead dusts were all below the reporting detection limit and airborne concentration for the other metals observed in the samples were less than 10% of the occupational exposure limit. Noise dosimetry sampling was performed on a random basis and was ...
Date: April 10, 2013
Creator: Sweeney, Lynn C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Burrowing Owl Monitoring Report for Calendar Year 2012

Description: The monitoring during 2012 focused on documenting the status of known burrows. Newly identified burrows were documented while examining historical locations, during ecological resource reviews, or discovered during other monitoring efforts. The timing of the monitoring effort allowed staff to perform the surveys without disrupting any breeding or hatching, while also allowing for easy discernment of adults from juveniles, which helped in determining burrow-use type.
Date: March 14, 2013
Creator: Wilde, Justin W.; Lindsey, Cole T. & Nugent, John J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Hanford Site Rare Plant Monitoring Report for Calendar Year 2012

Description: Two patches of Columbian yellowcress on the Hanford Reach were visited in both 2011 and 2012 to compare ramet counts between years: near Allerd Pumphouse (Rkm 615.4) and near White Bluffs Boat Launch (Rkm 593.3) (Figure 3). In 2012, the population near Allerd Pumphouse had 45 ramets present within a 5x3 m area. At the same population in 2011, there were 60 ramets. In 2012, the population near White Bluffs Boat Launch had 105 ramets in a 2x2 m area. At the same population in 2011, there were 100 ramets. This data shows that while annual variability does exist, ramet counts were relatively similar from 2011 to 2012. This is likely due to the similar flow regimes of 2011 and 2012, which both had above average snowpack, high flows, and extended spring flooding seasons. A total of 19.6 miles (31.5 km) of the Hanford shoreline were surveyed in 2012, with ten patches identified and approximately 1,250 ramets counted. It is not known how many individual plants this count represents due to the rhizomatous nature of the species. Two of these sites were identified previously in the WNHP database, and the remaining eight were newly identified locations. Eleven of the ramets had flowers and/or buds in the patches located during 2012, but no fruits were found
Date: March 21, 2013
Creator: Salstrom, D; Easterly, R; Lindsey, Cole T. & Nugent, John J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION SURVEY SUMMARY AND RESULTS FOR SUB-SLAB SOILS ASSOCIATED WITH THE FORMER BUILDING K-33, OAK RIDGE, TENNESSEE

Description: At DOE’s request, ORAU conducted confirmatory surveys of the K-33 sub-slab soil during the period of August 2011 through May 2012. The survey activities included visual inspections and measurement and sampling activities. LSRS was forthcoming with information relating to surface scan results. Scans performed by the contractor were of adequate coverage and overall data appear to represent actual site conditions. However, the LSRS technicians failed to identify several areas of elevated direct gamma radiation. Most of the samples taken by ORAU at locations of elevated instrument response were above the remediation concentration for one or more radionuclides of concern (ROC). The contractor was, however, quick to perform additional remediation of areas identified to have contamination above the guidelines. Further investigation by ORAU was not requested once additional remediation was completed. It is presumed the remediation contractor’s future PCCR will present detailed and conclusive evidence that K-33 sub-slab soils either comply or do not comply with record of decision (ROD) criteria. However, ORAU concludes, based on both independent verification (IV) data and data provided by LSRS, that the remediation contractor followed appropriate and applicable procedures and that the associated data adequately represent site conditions.
Date: September 20, 2012
Creator: ALTIC, NICK A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Systematic Method for Evaluating Extraction and Injection Flow Rates for 100-KR-4 and 100-HR-3 Groundwater Operable Unit Pump-and-Treat Interim Actions for Hydraulic Containment

Description: This document describes a systematic method to develop flow rate recommendations for Pump-and-Treat (P&T) extraction and injection wells in 100-KR-4 and 100-HR-3 Groundwater Operable Units (OU) of the Hanford Site. Flow rate recommendations are developed as part of ongoing performance monitoring and remedy optimization of the P&T interim actions to develop hydraulic contairnnent of the dissolved chromium plume in groundwater and protect the Columbia River from further discharges of groundwater from inland. This document details the methodology and data required to infer the influence of individual wells near the shoreline on hydraulic containment and river protection and develop flow rate recommendations to improve system performance and mitigate potential shortcomings of the system configuration in place.
Date: March 20, 2013
Creator: Spiliotopoulos, Alexandros A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

SAVANNAH RIVER SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT FOR 2012

Description: This report is an overview of effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance activities conducted on and in the vicinity of SRS from January 1 through December 31, 2012 - including the Site�s performance against applicable standards and requirements. Details are provided on major programs such as the Environmental Management System (EMS) and permit compliance.
Date: September 12, 2013
Creator: Griffith, M.; Jannik, T.; Cauthen, K.; Bryant, T.; Coward, L.; Eddy, T. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

SAVANNAH RIVER SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT SUMMARY FOR 2012

Description: This report's purpose is to: � Present summary environmental data that characterize Site environmental management performance, � Describe compliance status with respect to environmental standards and requirements, and � Highlight significant programs and efforts. Environmental monitoring is conducted extensively with a 2,000-square-mile network extending 25 miles from SRS, with some monitoring performed as far as 100 miles from the Site. The area includes neighboring cities, towns, and counties in Georgia (GA) and South Carolina (SC). Thousands of samples of air, rainwater, surface water, drinking water, groundwater, food products, wildlife, soil, sediment, and vegetation are collected by SRS and analyzed for the presence of radioactive and nonradioactive contaminants. During 2012, SRS accomplished several significant milestones while maintaining its record of environmental excellence, as its operations continued to result in minimal impact to the public and the environment. The Site�s radioactive and chemical discharges to air and water were well below regulatory standards for environmental and public health protection; its air and water quality met applicable requirements; and the potential radiation dose to the public was well below the DOE public dose limit.
Date: September 12, 2013
Creator: Griffith, M. & Meyer, A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Efficiencies and Optimization of Weak Base Anion Ion-Exchange Resin for Groundwater Hexavalent Chromium Removal at Hanford - 14202

Description: The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) contractor, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, has successfully converted a series of groundwater treatment facilities to use a new treatment resin that is delivering more than $3 million in annual cost savings and efficiency in treating groundwater contamination at the DOE Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. During the production era, the nuclear reactors at the Hanford Site required a continuous supply of high-quality cooling water during operations. Cooling water consumption ranged from about 151,417 to 378,541 L/min (40,000 to 100,000 gal/min) per reactor, depending on specific operating conditions. Water from the Columbia River was filtered and treated chemically prior to use as cooling water, including the addition of sodium dichromate as a corrosion inhibitor. Hexavalent chromium was the primary component of the sodium dichromate and was introduced into the groundwater at the Hanford Site as a result of planned and unplanned discharges from the reactors starting in 1944. Groundwater contamination by hexavalent chromium and other contaminants related to nuclear reactor operations resulted in the need for groundwater remedial actions within the Hanford Site reactor areas. Beginning in 1995, groundwater treatment methods were evaluated, leading to the use of pumpand- treat facilities with ion exchange using Dowex™a 21K, a regenerable, strong-base anion exchange resin. This required regeneration of the resin, which was performed offsite. In 2008, DOE recognized that regulatory agreements would require significant expansion for the groundwater chromium treatment capacity. As a result, CH2M HILL performed testing at the Hanford Site in 2009 and 2010 to demonstrate resin performance in the specific groundwater chemistry at different waste sites. The testing demonstrated that a weak-base anion, single-use resin, specifically ResinTech SIR-700 ®b, was effective at removing chromium, had a significantly higher capacity, could be disposed of efficiently onsite, and would eliminate the complexities and ...
Date: February 3, 2014
Creator: Nesham, Dean O.; Ivarson, Kristine A.; Hanson, James P.; Miller, Charles W.; Meyers, P. & Jaschke, Naomi M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Evolution of Long-Term Stewardship at Hanford - 14189

Description: Hanford�s Long-Term Stewardship (LTS) Program has evolved from a small, informal process, with minimal support, to a robust program that provides comprehensive transitions from cleanup contractors to long-term stewardship for post-cleanup requirements specified in the associated cleanup decision documents. The LTS Program has the responsibility for almost 100,000 acres of land, along with over 200 waste sites and will soon have six cocooned reactors. Close to 2,600 documents have been identified and tagged for storage in the LTS document library. The program has successfully completed six consecutive transitions over the last two years in support of the U.S. DOE Richland Operations Office�s (DOE-RL) near-term cleanup objectives of significantly reducing the footprint of active cleanup operations for the River Corridor. The program has evolved from one that was initially responsible for defining and measuring Institutional Controls for the Hanford Site, to a comprehensive, post remediation surveillance and maintenance program that begins early in the transition process. In 2013, the first reactor area―the cocooned 105-F Reactor and its surrounding 1,100 acres, called the F Area was transitioned. In another �first,� the program is expected to transition the five remaining cocooned reactors into the program through using a Transition and Turnover Package (TTP). As Hanford�s LTS Program moves into the next few years, it will continue to build on a collaborative approach. The program has built strong relationships between contractors, regulators, tribes and stakeholders and with the U.S. Department of Energy�s Office of Legacy Management (LM). The LTS Program has been working with LM since its inception. The transition process utilized LM�s Site Transition Framework as one of the initial requirement documents and the Hanford Program continues to collaborate with LM today. One example of this collaboration is the development of the LTS Program�s records management system in which, LM has been instrumental. ...
Date: November 12, 2013
Creator: Moren, Richard J. & Grindstaff, Keith D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

ENVIRONMENTAL SURVEILLANCE IN THE VINCINITY OF HANFORD FOR AUGUST, 1968

Description: This report contains information related to radioactive materials in the Columbia River, the atmosphere, and selected foods for August, 1968, Measurements of the Columbia River flow rate, temperature, and chemical characteristics are also shown. Data for the previous twelve months is included.
Date: October 18, 1968
Creator: Wooldridge,, C. B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Hanford Reach Fall Chinook Redd Monitoring Report for Calendar Year 2013

Description: The U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) conducts ecological monitoring on the Hanford Site to collect and track data needed to ensure compliance with an array of environmental laws, regulations, and policies governing DOE activities. Ecological monitoring data provide baseline information about the plants, animals, and habitat under DOE-RL stewardship at Hanford required for decision-making under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). The Hanford Site Comprehensive Land Use Plan (CLUP, DOE/EIS-0222-F) which is the Environmental Impact Statement for Hanford Site activities, helps ensure that DOE-RL, its contractors, and other entities conducting activities on the Hanford Site are in compliance with NEPA.
Date: February 10, 2014
Creator: Lindsey, Cole T. & Nugent, John J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Hanford Site Anuran Monitoring Report for Calendar Year 2013

Description: The U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) conducts ecological monitoring on the Hanford Site to collect and track data needed to ensure compliance with an array of environmental laws, regulations, and policies governing DOE activities. Ecological monitoring data provide baseline information about the plants, animals, and habitat under DOE-RL stewardship at Hanford required for decision-making under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). The Hanford Site Comprehensive Land Use Plan (CLUP, DOE/EIS-0222-F) which is the Environmental Impact Statement for Hanford Site activities, helps ensure that DOE-RL, its contractors, and other entities conducting activities on the Hanford Site are in compliance with NEPA.
Date: February 13, 2014
Creator: Wilde, Justin W.; Johnson, Scott J. & Lindsey, Cole T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Hanford Site Black-Tailed Jackrabbit Monitoring Report for Fiscal Year 2013

Description: The U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) conducts ecological monitoring on the Hanford Site to collect and track data needed to ensure compliance with an array of environmental laws, regulations, and policies governing DOE activities. Ecological monitoring data provide baseline information about the plants, animals, and habitat under DOE-RL stewardship at Hanford required for decision-making under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). The Hanford Site Comprehensive Land Use Plan (CLUP, DOE/EIS-0222-F) which is the Environmental Impact Statement for Hanford Site activities, helps ensure that DOE-RL, its contractors, and other entities conducting activities on the Hanford Site are in compliance with NEPA.
Date: February 13, 2014
Creator: Lindsey, Cole T.; Nugent, John J.; Wilde, Justin W. & Johnson, Scott J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Hanford Site Raptor Nest Monitoring Report for Calendar Year 2013

Description: The U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) conducts ecological monitoring on the Hanford Site to collect and track data needed to ensure compliance with an array of environmental laws, regulations, and policies governing DOE activities. Ecological monitoring data provide baseline information about the plants, animals, and habitat under DOE-RL stewardship at Hanford required for decision-making under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). The Hanford Site Comprehensive Land Use Plan (CLUP, DOE/EIS-0222-F) which is the Environmental Impact Statement for Hanford Site activities, helps ensure that DOE-RL, its contractors, and other entities conducting activities on the Hanford Site are in compliance with NEPA.
Date: February 13, 2014
Creator: Nugent, John J.; Lindsey, Cole T. & Wilde, Justin W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

PROGRESSIVE VENTILATION OF THE OCEANS - POTENTIAL FOR RETURN TO ANOXIC CONDITIONS IN THE POST-PALEOZOIC

Description: After the ventilation of the residual anoxic layer in the late Paleozoic (Berry and Wilde, 1978) a return to ephemeral anoxic conditions in the ocean is suggested by anoxic sediments found in the Mesozoic cores of the deep-sea drilling program (Schlanger and Jenkyns 1977, and Theide and Van Andel 1977). A preliminary physical oceanographic model is presented to explain the development of oxygen depleted layers in mid-waters below the surface wind-mixed layer during non-glacial climates. The model shows the range of temperature, salinity and density values for hypothetical water masses for two climatically related oceanographic situations: Case A where bottom waters are formed at mid-latitudes at the surface salinity maxima, and Case B where bottom waters are produced at high latitudes but not by sea-ice formation as in the modern ocean. The hypothetical water masses are characterized by examples from the modern ocean and extrapolation to non-glacial times is made by eliminating water masses produced by or influenced by sea-ice formation in modern glacial times. The state of oxidation is made by plotting the model water masses on an oxygen saturation diagram and comparing the relative oxygen capacity with modern conditions of zonal organic productivity. The model indicates for Case A (high latitude temperatures above 5°C) two oxygen, depleted layers in the equatorial regions (1) from about 200m to the depth of completed oxidation of surface material separated by an oxygenated zone to (2) a deep depleted zone along the base of the pycnocline at 2900 M. The deep depleted zone extends along the Case A pycnocline polarward toward the high latitude productivity maximum. For case B with a pycnocline at about 1500m the deep anoxic layer is not sustained. Considerations of density only, suggest that neutral stratification and the potential for overturn is enhanced for climates transitional between Case ...
Date: September 1, 1980
Creator: Wilde, Pat & Berry, William B.N.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Bibliography of environmental research: ecosystems department, 1952--1975

Description: A bibliography of environmental research is presented which consists of items published between 1952 and mid-1975 by past and present staff members of the Ecosystems Dept., Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories. The material is arranged by alphabetical listing of author. Under each author, publications are listed chronologically by publication date in the categories of: journal articles, books, reports, and patents. No indexes are included. (LCL)
Date: December 1975
Creator: Vaughan, B. E. & Helbling, J. L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Environmental Shortcourse Final report [Joint US-EC Short Course on Environmental Biotechnology: Microbial Catalysts for the Environment]

Description: The Joint US-EC Short Course on Environmental Biotechnology is designed for several purposes. One of the central tenets is to bring together young scientists (at the late Ph.D. or early postdoctoral stages of their careers) in a forum that will set the groundwork for future overseas collaborative interactions. The course is also designed to give the scientists hands-on experience in modern, up-to-date biotechnological methods for the analysis of microbes and their activities pertinent to the remediation of pollutants in the environment. The 2011 course covered multiple theoretical and practical topics in environmental biotechnology. The practical part was centered around a full concise experiment to demonstrate the possibility for targeted remediation of contaminated soil. Experiments included chemical, microbiological, and molecular analyses of sediments and/or waters, contaminant bioavailability assessment, seeded bioremediation, gene probing, PCR amplification, microbial community analysis based on 16S rRNA gene diversity, and microarray analyses. Each of these topics is explained in detail. The practical part of the course was complemented with two lectures per day, given by distinguished scientists from the US and from Europe, covering a research area related to what the students are doing in the course.
Date: March 5, 2013
Creator: Zylstra, Gerben & van der Meer, Jan Roelof
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Ensemble Single Column Modeling in the Tropics - Derivation of observed forcing data sets, estimation of observation uncertainty and application to parametrization improvements

Description: The project was carried out in 2 distinct phases. In the first phase we established the general validity of using an ensemble approach to Single Column Modeling (SCM) using the Manus and Nauru sites. In the second phase we derived and applied an ensemble forcing derivation technique to observations. First we derived an ensemble forcing estimate for the TWP-ICE experiment and then by extended the method to provide three wet seasons of “continuous ensemble forcing” for the Darwin site. The main purpose of using ensemble techniques in SCM simulation is to be able to assess how much of the overall SCM simulation error is due to model errors and how much due to errors in the forcing.
Date: July 6, 2012
Creator: Jakob, Christian
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department