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Theory of normal and superconducting properties of fullerene-based solids

Description: Recent experiments on the normal-state and superconducting properties of fullerene-based solids are used to constrain the proposal theories of the electronic nature of these materials. In general, models of superconductivity based on electron pairing induced by phonons are consistent with electronic band theory. The latter experiments also yield estimates of the parameters characterizing these type H superconductors. It is argued that, at this point, a ``standard model`` of phonons interacting with itinerant electrons may be a good first approximation for explaining the properties of the metallic fullerenes.
Date: October 1, 1992
Creator: Cohen, M. L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

CO{sub 2} emissions from developing countries: Better understanding the role of Energy in the long term. Volume 2, Argentina, Brazil, Mexico, and Venezuela

Description: Recent years have witnessed a growing recognition of the link between emissions of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and changes in the global climate. Of all anthropogenic activities, energy production and use generate the single largest portion of these greenhouse gases. Although developing countries currently account for a small share of global carbon emissions, their contribution is increasing rapidly. Due to the rapid expansion of energy demand in these nations, the developing world`s share in global modern energy use rose from 16 to 27 percent between 1970 and 1990. If the growth rates observed over the past 20 years persist energy demand in developing will surpass that in the countries of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) early in the 21st century. The study seeks to examine the forces that galvanize the growth of energy use and carbon emissions, to assess the likely future levels of energy and CO{sub 2} in selected developing nations and to identify opportunities for restraining this growth. The purpose of this report is to provide the quantitative information needed to develop effective policy options, not to identify the options themselves. These individual studies were conducted fro Argentina, Brazil, Mexico and Venezuela in Latin America.
Date: July 1, 1991
Creator: Ketoff, A.; Sathaye, J. & Goldman, N.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Topics in particle physics and cosmology

Description: The Standard Model of particle physics, together with the Big Bang model of the early universe, constitute a framework which encompasses our current understanding of fundamental laws and beginning of our universe. Despite recent speculative trends, quantum field theory remains the theoretical tool of choice for investigating new physics either at high energy colliders, or in the early universe. In this dissertation, several field theoretic phenomena relevant to cosmology or particle physics are explored. A common theme in these explorations is the structure of the vacuum state in quantum field theory. First, we discuss first-order phase transitions in the early universe, in which the effective vacuum state of the universe shifts discontinuously as the temperature drops below some critical point. We find that the dynamics of a certain type of first-order phase transition can lead to production of primordial black holes, which could constitute the dark matter of our universe. Alternatively, supercooled first-order phase transitions may be the cause of an extended inflationary epoch in the early universe, which is generally regarded as necessary to solve several cosmological puzzles. We derive limits on such scenarios based on nearly model-independent percolation properties of the transition. We also study some nonperturbative aspects of the field theory vacuum. We show that non-topological solitons of a single fermion and Higgs fields can only exist in strongly coupled theories. In particular, we find that at the lowest fermionic excitations in the Standard Model are single fermions, and not bound states of fermion plugs Higgs. Finally, we investigate the intriguing behavior of instanton-induced cross sections. We discover Higgs-Higgs cross sections which increase exponentially with center of mass energy due to the presence of instanton solutions related to vacuum instability.
Date: August 2, 1991
Creator: Hsu, S. D. H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Diffraction and holography with photoelectrons and Auger electrons: Some new directions

Description: The current status of photoelectron and Auger-electron diffraction is reviewed, with emphasis on new directions of activity. The use of forward scattering in the study of adsorbed molecules, epitaxial overlayers, and clean surfaces is one of the most developed applications, and one that will become more powerful as higher energy resolution and perhaps spin analysis are used to resolve emitters on the basis of chemical state, position at a surface, or magnetic state. The use of larger data sets spanning a considerable fraction of the solid angle above a surface will also much enhance the structural information available, for example, in the growth of epitaxial layers or nanostructures on surfaces. Detailed fitting of experimental data to theoretical calculations based upon either single scattering or multiple scattering should also provide more rich structural information, including such parameters as substrate interlayer relaxation. Surface phase transitions in which near-surface layers become highly disordered can also be studied, with results that are complementary to those from such techniques as low energy electron diffraction and medium energy ion scattering. Short-range magnetic order also can be probed by somehow resolving the spin of the outgoing electrons, e.g. by using multiplet-split core levels.
Date: June 1, 1992
Creator: Fadley, C. S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A fragment separator at LBL for beta-NMR experiment

Description: The Beam 44 fragment separator was built at the Bevalac of LBL for NMR studies of beta emitting nuclei. {sup 37}K, {sup 39}Ca, and {sup 43}Ti fragments originating from {sup 40}Ca and {sup 46}Ti primary beams were separated by the separator for NMR studies on these nuclei. Nuclear spin polarization was created in {sup 39}Ca and {sup 43}Ti using the tilted foil technique (TFT), and the magnetic moment of {sup 43}Ti was deduced. Fragment polarization was measured for {sup 37}K and {sup 39}Ca emitted to finite deflection angles. The Beam 44 fragment separator in combination with a proper polarization technique, such as TFT or fragment polarization, has been very effective for such NMR studies.
Date: March 1, 1992
Creator: Matsuta, K.; Ozawa, A.; Nojiri, Y.; Minamisono, T.; Fukuda, M.; Kitagawa, A. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Overview of medium heterogeneity and transport processes

Description: Medium heterogeneity can have significant impact on the behavior of solute transport. Tracer breakthrough curves from transport in a heterogeneous medium are distinctly different from that in a homogeneous porous medium. Usually the shape of the breakthrough curves are highly non-symmetrical with a fast rise at early times and very long tail at late times, and often, they consist of multiple peaks. Moreover, unlike transport in a homogeneous medium where the same transport parameters describe the entire medium, transport through heterogeneous media gives rise to breakthrough curves which have strong spatial dependence. These inherent characteristics of transport in heterogeneous medium present special challenge to the performance assessment of a potential high level nuclear waste repository with respect to the possible release of radio nuclides to the accessible environment. Since an inherently desirable site characteristic for a waste repository is that flow and transport should be slow, then transport measurements in site characterization efforts will necessarily be spatially small and temporally short compare to the scales which are of relevance to performance assessment predictions. In this paper we discuss the role of medium heterogeneity in site characterization and performance assessment. Our discussion will be based on a specific example of a 3D heterogeneous stochastic model of a site generally similar to, the Aespoe Island, the site of the Hard Rock Laboratory in Southern Sweden. For our study, alternative 3D stochastic fields of hydraulic conductivities conditioned on ``point`` measurements shall be generated. Results of stochastic flow and transport simulations would be used to address the issues of (1) the relationship of tracer breakthrough with the structure of heterogeneity, and (2) the inference from small scale testing results to large scale and long term predictions.
Date: November 1, 1993
Creator: Tsang, Y. & Tsang, C. F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Bimolecular reaction dynamics from photoelectron spectroscopy of negative ions

Description: The transition state region of a neutral bimolecular reaction may be experimentally investigated by photoelectron spectroscopy of an appropriate negative ion. The photoelectron spectrum provides information on the spectroscopy and dynamics of the short lived transition state and may be used to develop model potential energy surfaces that are semi-quantitative in this important region. The principles of bound {yields} bound negative ion photoelectron spectroscopy are illustrated by way of an example: a full analysis of the photoelectron bands of CN{sup {minus}}, NCO{sup {minus}} and NCS{sup {minus}}. Transition state photoelectron spectra are presented for the following systems Br + HI, Cl + HI, F + HI, F + CH{sub 3}0H,F + C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH,F + OH and F + H{sub 2}. A time dependent framework for the simulation and interpretation of the bound {yields} free transition state photoelectron spectra is subsequently developed and applied to the hydrogen transfer reactions Br + HI, F + OH {yields} O({sup 3}P, {sup 1}D) + HF and F + H{sub 2}. The theoretical approach for the simulations is a fully quantum-mechanical wave packet propagation on a collinear model reaction potential surface. The connection between the wavepacket time evolution and the photoelectron spectrum is given by the time autocorrelation function. For the benchmark F + H{sub 2} system, comparisons with three-dimensional quantum calculations are made.
Date: November 1, 1992
Creator: Bradforth, S. E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Energy intensities in OECD countries, 1970--1989: A sectoral analysis

Description: We discuss the evolution of energy intensities in key sectors or subsectors between the early 1970s and the late 1980s in nine OECD countries. The sectors covered are manufacturing, automobile and air travel, freight trucking, residential space heating, and the service sector. Intensity changes varied among the sectors and countries, but common trends are visible in many cases. In most cases, the intensity decline slowed or ceased in the mid-1980s. We discuss the causes for the changes observed in each area, showing how energy-price changes were but one of many factors that played a role. Weighting the changes in intensities by 1973 energy use patterns, we find that the aggregate energy intensity index fell by 14--19% between 1973 and 1988 in the US, Japan, and West Germany.
Date: November 1, 1992
Creator: Schipper, L.; Meyers, S. & Howarth, R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

CO{sub 2} emissions from developing countries: Better understanding the role of energy in the long term. Volume 3, China, India, Indonesia, and South Korea

Description: Recent years have witnessed a growing recognition of the link between emissions of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and changes in the global climate. Of all anthropogenic activities, energy production and use generate the single largest portion of these greenhouse gases. Although developing countries currently account for a small share of global carbon emissions, their contribution is increasing rapidly. Due to the rapid expansion of energy demand in these nations, the developing world`s share in global modern energy use rose from 16 to 27 percent between 1970 and 1990. If the growth rates observed over the past 20 years persist, energy demand in developing nations will surpass that in the countries of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) early in the 21st century. The study seeks to examine the forces that galvanize the growth of energy use and carbon emissions, to assess the likely future levels of energy and Co{sub 2} in selected developing nations and to identify opportunities for restraining this growth. The purpose of this report is to provide the quantitative information needed to develop effective policy options, not to identify the options themselves. These individual studies were conducted for China, India, Indonesia and South Korea in Asia.
Date: July 1, 1991
Creator: Sathaye, J. & Goldman, N.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

CO{sub 2} emissions from developing countries: Better understanding the role of energy in the long term. Volume 4, Ghana, Sierra Leone, Nigeria and the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries

Description: Recent years have witnessed a growing recognition of the link between emissions of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and changes in the global climate. of all anthropogenic activities, energy production and use generate the single largest portion of these greenhouse gases. Although developing countries currently account for a small share of global carbon emissions, their contribution is increasing rapidly. Due to the rapid expansion of energy demand in these nations, the developing world`s share in global modern energy use rose from 16 to 27 percent between 1970 and 1990. If the growth rates observed over the past 20 years persist, energy demand in developing nations will surpass that in the countries of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) early in the 21st century. The study seeks to examine the forces that galvanize the growth of energy use and carbon emissions, to assess the likely future levels of energy and CO{sub 2} in selected developing nations and to identify opportunities for restraining this growth. The purpose of this report is to provide the quantitative information needed to develop effective policy options, not to identify the options themselves. A combined study was carried out for the countries of the Gulf Cooperation Council (Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates).
Date: July 1, 1991
Creator: Sathaye, J. & Goldman, N.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Advanced insulations for refrigerator/freezers: The potential for new shell designs incorporating polymer barrier construction

Description: The impending phase-out of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) used to expand foam insulation, combined with requirements for increased energy efficiency, make the use of non-CFC-based high performance insulation technologies increasingly attractive. The majority of current efforts are directed at using advanced insulations in the form of thin, flat low-conductivity gas-filled or evacuated orthogonal panels, which we refer to as Advanced Insulation Panels (AIPs). AIPs can be used in composite with blown polymer foams to improve insulation performance in refrigerator/freezers (R/Fs) of conventional design and manufacture. This AIP/foam composite approach is appealing because it appears to be a feasible, near-term method for incorporating advanced insulations into R/Fs without substantial redesign or retooling. However, the requirements for adequate flow of foam during the foam-in-place operation impose limitations on the allowable thickness and coverage area of AIPs. This report examines design alternatives which may offer a greater increase in overall thermal resistance than is possible with the use of AIP/foam composites in current R/F design. These design alternatives generally involve a basic redesign of the R/F taking into account the unique requirements of advanced insulations and the importance of minimizing thermal bridging with high thermal resistance insulations. The focus here is on R/F doors because they are relatively simple and independent R/F components and are therefore good candidates for development of alterative designs. R/F doors have significant thermal bridging problems due to the steel outer shell construction. A three dimensional finite difference computer modeling exercise of a R/F door geometry was used to compare the overall levels of thermal resistance (R-value) for various design configurations.
Date: November 1, 1992
Creator: Griffith, B. T. & Arasteh, D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Worldwide status of energy standards for buildings: Appendices

Description: This informal survey was designed to gain information about the worldwide status of energy efficiency standards for buildings, particularly non-residential buildings such as offices, schools, and hotels. The project has three goals: 1. To understand and learn from the experience of countries with existing building energy standards; 2. To locate areas where these lessons might be applied and energy standards might be effectively proposed and developed; and 3. To share the information gathered with all participating countries. These appendices include the survey cover letter, the survey, and the details of selected energy standards in 35 countries, thus providing supporting material for the authors` article of the same title.
Date: February 1, 1993
Creator: Janda, K. B. & Busch, J. F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Differential calculus on quantum spaces and quantum groups

Description: A review of recent developments in the quantum differential calculus. The quantum group GL{sub q}(n) is treated by considering it as a particular quantum space. Functions on SL{sub q} (n) are defined as a subclass of functions on GL{sub q}(n). The case of SO{sub q}(n) is also briefly considered. These notes cover part of a lecture given at the XIX International Conference on Group Theoretic Methods in Physics, Salamanca, Spain 1992.
Date: December 10, 1992
Creator: Zumino, B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

An interface configuration experiment on USML-1

Description: Experiments were carried out for ``exotic`` rotationally symmetric containers aboard the first NASA United States Microgravity Laboratory Space Shuttle flight (USML-1). The containers have the property that they admit an entire continuum of distinct equilibrium rotationally-symmetric capillary free-surfaces for a given liquid volume and contact angle. It was found, after the containers were filled in orbit, that an initial equilibrium interface from the symmetric continuum reoriented, when perturbed, to a stable interface that was not rotationally symmetric, as predicted by the mathematical theory.
Date: January 1, 1993
Creator: Concus, P.; Finn, R. & Weislogel, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development of advanced secondary zinc cells for power-source applications

Description: The general advantages of Zn/AgO batteries are high specific energy, high discharge rate capability, good charge acceptance, and low self-discharge rate. However, the principal disadvantages of high cost and short cycle life have limited the use of this battery to applications where high specific energy is the prime requisite, such as military and flight applications, portable electronic equipment, etc. The major objectives of this research project are to improve the Zn/AgO cell cycle life and increases its performance. The redistribution of Zn active material (shape change) and the growth of Zn dendrites (which leads to cell shorting) have been identified as primary factors that limit the cycle-life performance of Zn/AgO cells. These phenomena can be largely overcome by improvements in separator materials, and by additives to the electrode and electrolyte. Recent development work on Zn/AgO cells has been concentrated in the area of Zn electrode and separator improvements to extend the lifetimes of cells.
Date: December 1, 1991
Creator: Chen, Jenn-Shing; McLarnon, F. R. & Cairns, E. J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Induced gauge theories and W gravity

Description: We review some aspects of induced gauge theories in two dimensions. We focus on W{sub 3} gravity, paying particular attention to the treatment of the non-linearities inherent to W gravity. We show that the induced action {Gamma}{sub ind}[h,b] for chiral W{sub 3} in the c {yields} {plus_minus}infinity limit is obtained from the induced action of a gauged Sl(3,R) Wess-Zumino-Witten model by imposing constraints on some of the affine currents. Subsequently we investigate the effective action, which is obtained by integrating the induced action over the gauge fields. We show perturbatively that certain subleading terms which appear in the induced action for finite c (and which are related to nonlocal terms in the Ward identifies) get canceled by similar terms due to loop corrections, and we propose an all-order result for the effective action.
Date: November 1, 1991
Creator: Schoutens, K.; Sevrin, A. & van Nieuwenhuizen, P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Energy use in Sweden: An international perspective

Description: This report analyzes the evolution of energy use in Sweden since the early 1970s. The purpose of the study, which is sponsored by NUTEK, Department of Energy Efficiency, the Swedish Agency for Technical and Industrial Development, is to shed light on the future path of energy use in Sweden by quantifying and understanding changes in past energy use. Energy efficiency has been identified by Swedish authorities in countless official studies as a key element in Sweden`s efforts to restrain oil imports, reduce reliance on nuclear power, reduce environmental impacts of energy use, and reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. To understand the role or performance of energy efficiency in the 1970s and 1980s in Sweden, and what this performance means about the future, the authors seek answers to three broad questions: (1) How has the structure and efficiency of energy use in Sweden evolved since the early 1970s, and where data permit, since even earlier? What caused these changes? (2) How does the structure of energy use in Sweden differ from that of other countries, and how has the evolution of energy use in Sweden differed from developments in other countries? (3) How much energy has Sweden saved, and why? Are these savings permanent? To what extent were they offset by changes in the structure of energy use? And to what extent is the magnitude of these savings dependent upon the way we measure energy use? The report reviews the long-term evolution of Swedish energy use, focusing on developments in five sectors of the economy: residential, service, industrial (manufacturing and {open_quotes}other industry{close_quotes} defined as mining, agriculture, forestry and fisheries, and construction), travel, and freight. The authors then examine Swedish energy use in a broader perspective, drawing detailed comparisons to other nations. Finally, they discuss a series of issues that hover over the ...
Date: December 1, 1993
Creator: Schipper, L.; Johnson, F.; Howarth, R.; Price, L.; Andersson, B. & Andersson, B. G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Monitoring peak power and cooling energy savings of shade trees and white surfaces in the Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) service area: Project design and preliminary results

Description: Urban areas in warm climates create summer heat islands of daily average intensity of 3--5{degrees}C, adding to discomfort and increasing air-conditioning loads. Two important factors contributing to urban heat islands are reductions in albedo (lower overall city reflectance) and loss of vegetation (less evapotranspiration). Reducing summer heat islands by planting vegetation (shade trees) and increasing surface albedos, saves cooling energy, allows down-sizing of air conditioners, lowers air-conditioning peak demand, and reduces the emission of CO{sub 2} and other pollutants from electric power plants. The focus of this multi-year project, jointly sponsored by SMUD and the California Institute for Energy Efficiency (CIEE), was to measure the direct cooling effects of trees and white surfaces (mainly roofs) in a few buildings in Sacramento. The first-year project was to design the experiment and obtain base case data. We also obtained limited post retrofit data for some sites. This report provides an overview of the project activities during the first year at six sites. The measurement period for some of the sites was limited to September and October, which are transitional cooling months in Sacramento and hence the interpretation of results only apply to this period. In one house, recoating the dark roof with a high-albedo coating rendered air conditioning unnecessary for the month of September (possible savings of up to 10 kWh per day and 2 kW of non-coincidental peak power). Savings of 50% relative to an identical base case bungalow were achieved when a school bungalow`s roof and southeast wall were coated with a high-albedo coating during the same period. Our measured data for the vegetation sites do not indicate conclusive results because shade trees were small and the cooling period was almost over. We need to collect more data over a longer cooling season in order to demonstrate savings conclusively.
Date: December 1, 1992
Creator: Akbari, H.; Bretz, S.; Hanford, J.; Rosenfeld, A.; Sailor, D.; Taha, H. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Linear adaptive noise-reduction filters for tomographic imaging: Optimizing for minimum mean square error

Description: This thesis solves the problem of finding the optimal linear noise-reduction filter for linear tomographic image reconstruction. The optimization is data dependent and results in minimizing the mean-square error of the reconstructed image. The error is defined as the difference between the result and the best possible reconstruction. Applications for the optimal filter include reconstructions of positron emission tomographic (PET), X-ray computed tomographic, single-photon emission tomographic, and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging. Using high resolution PET as an example, the optimal filter is derived and presented for the convolution backprojection, Moore-Penrose pseudoinverse, and the natural-pixel basis set reconstruction methods. Simulations and experimental results are presented for the convolution backprojection method.
Date: April 1, 1993
Creator: Sun, W. Y.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Recursive recovery of Markov transition probabilities from boundary value data

Description: In an effort to mathematically describe the anisotropic diffusion of infrared radiation in biological tissue Gruenbaum posed an anisotropic diffusion boundary value problem in 1989. In order to accommodate anisotropy, he discretized the temporal as well as the spatial domain. The probabilistic interpretation of the diffusion equation is retained; radiation is assumed to travel according to a random walk (of sorts). In this random walk the probabilities with which photons change direction depend upon their previous as well as present location. The forward problem gives boundary value data as a function of the Markov transition probabilities. The inverse problem requires finding the transition probabilities from boundary value data. Problems in the plane are studied carefully in this thesis. Consistency conditions amongst the data are derived. These conditions have two effects: they prohibit inversion of the forward map but permit smoothing of noisy data. Next, a recursive algorithm which yields a family of solutions to the inverse problem is detailed. This algorithm takes advantage of all independent data and generates a system of highly nonlinear algebraic equations. Pluecker-Grassmann relations are instrumental in simplifying the equations. The algorithm is used to solve the 4 {times} 4 problem. Finally, the smallest nontrivial problem in three dimensions, the 2 {times} 2 {times} 2 problem, is solved.
Date: April 1, 1994
Creator: Patch, S. K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Theoretical study of the conformation and energy of supercoiled DNA

Description: The two sugar-phosphate backbones of the DNA molecule wind about each other in helical paths. For circular DNA molecules, or for linear pieces of DNA with the ends anchored, the two strands have a well-defined linking number, Lk. If Lk differs from the equilibrium linking number Lk{sub 0}, the molecule is supercoiled. The linking difference {Delta}Lk = Lk-Lk{sub 0} is partitioned between torsional deformation of the DNA, or twist ({Delta}Tw), and a winding of the DNA axis about itself known as writhe (Wr). In this dissertation, the conformation and energy of supercoiled DNA are examined by treating DNA as an elastic cylinder. Finite-length and entropic effects are ignored, and all extensive quantities are treated as linear densities. Two classes of conformation are considered: the plectonemic or interwound form, in which the axis of the DNA double helix winds about itself in a double superhelix, and the toroidal shape in which the axis is wrapped around a torus. Minimum energy conformation are found. For biologically relevant values of specific linking differences, the plectonemic DNA, the superhelical pitch angle {alpha} is in the range 45{degree} < {alpha} {le} 90{degree}. For low values of specific linking difference {vert_bar}{sigma}{vert_bar} ({sigma} = {Delta}Lk/Lk{sub 0}), most linking difference is in writhe. As {vert_bar}{sigma}{vert_bar} increases, a greater proportion of linking difference is in twist. Interaction between DNA strands is treated first as a hard-body excluded volume and then as a screened electrostatic repulsion. Ionic strength is found to have a large effect, resulting in significantly greater torsional stress in supercoiled DNA at low ionic strength.
Date: January 1, 1992
Creator: Hunt, N. G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A spreadsheet for analyzing the in situ performance of fluorescent luminaires

Description: A spreadsheet program for determining system efficacy, power input and light output of common 4 ft fluorescent lighting systems under realistic operating conditions is described. The program uses accepted IES engineering principles to precisely account for ballast factor, existing thermal conditions and maintenance practices. The spreadsheet, which includes a data base of lamp and ballast performance data, can be used to calculate the cost-effectiveness of many common lighting retrofits.
Date: August 1, 1991
Creator: Rubinstein, F. & Zhang, Chin
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Spectroscopy of transient neutral species via negative ion photoelectron spectroscopy

Description: Negative ion photoelectron spectroscopy has been used to study two types of transient neutral species: bound free radicals (NO{sub 2} and NO{sub 3}) and unstable neutral species ([IHI] and [FH{sub 2}]). The negative ion time-of-flight photoelectron spectrometer used for these experiments is described in detail.
Date: December 1, 1991
Creator: Weaver, A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department