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Sven-David Sandström's Matthäuspassion: Examining J.S. Bach's Influence and Sandström's Compositional Language, Use of Symbolism, and Religious and Spiritual Motivations

Description: Beginning with his High Mass written in 1994, popular Swedish composer Sven-David Sandström modeled multiple compositions after famous canonical works using the same texts and/or instrumentation. Sandström wants to be compared tot he greatest, specifically in how a twenty-first century composer responds to a text set , in the case of J.S. Bach's , over 250 years ago. His setting of Matthäuspassion (MP), which uses the same libretto as J.S. Bach, is his most extensive non-operatic work, one he considers his most significant, and likely his last work based on a preexisting model. This study 1) examines the influence of J.S. Bach's MP on Sandström's setting in the use of characters and chorales, 2) illustrates Sandström's compositional language in MP based on recent studies on his choral music, 3) describes his use of musical symbolism, and 4) discusses his religious and spiritual motivations behind the work, as well as his preferred uses in performance.
Date: August 2016
Creator: Jilek, Dwight
Partner: UNT Libraries

Korean Cultural and Musical Influences in Younghi Pagh-Paan's Man-Nam I

Description: Younghi Pagh-Paan is an internationally renowned contemporary Korean-German composer. While her music has been strongly influenced by German contemporary musical aesthetics, her compositions also possess Korean musical and cultural influences. In her works, Pagh-Paan employs Western instruments and musical languages that incorporate contemporary techniques such as vibratos, flatter tonguing, pitch bends, and legato glissandi. These effects are thought to imitate the sounds created by traditional Korean instruments. Man-Nam I, for clarinet and string trio, was the second work that Pagh-Paan composed following her move from Korea to Germany. The piece includes many sounds representative of traditional Korean instruments, along with significant symbolism of the sociological background, culture and history of Korean people. The study of Man-Nam I focuses on unraveling hidden elements of Korean traditional music and culture, and addresses the need for the performers to understand its rich Korean influences in order to reach a deeper interpretation of Pagh-Paan's work.
Date: August 2016
Creator: Jung, Hyejin
Partner: UNT Libraries

Two Harpsichord Sonatas by Antonio Soler: Analysis and Transcription for Solo Guitar

Description: There is a puacity of original works from the Baroque Era for the guitar. Transcriptions, especially music originally for harpsichord, complement the guitarist's repertoire. Dominating the priviledged space in the guitar canon, represented by Baroque transcriptions, are the composers Johann Sebastian Bach, George Frideric Handel and Domenico Scarlatti. Underrepresented in the Baroque guitar canon is the music of Spanish composers, most noteworthy, the harpsichordist Padre Antonio Soler, who composed more than 120 sonatas for his instrument. Music is culturally defined and it is clear, through an analysis of the keyboard works of Soler, that his music was imbued with the salient features of his place and time. There is an implicit connection between the guitar and the non-guitar music produced in Spain as guitar gestures are part of the national emblem; this study makes an explicit connection between the harpsichord music of Soler and the modern guitar. The Spanish Baroque style, epitomized by the works of Soler, provide a clear objective for transcription. The current study produces a transcription of Padre Antonio Soler's Sonata No. R.27 and Sonata No. R.100, as well as an analysis of the sonatas to facilitate interpretation for performance and an explanation of the transcription process. The lacunae of Spanish Baroque guitar transcriptions that exists in the repertoire will be partially filled by adding Soler to the distinguished list of composers that currently inhabit the guitarists's library.
Date: August 2016
Creator: Daniel, Andrew Ray
Partner: UNT Libraries

Two Piano Editions of the Third and Fifth Movements of Bartók's Concerto for Orchestra: Their Textual Fidelity and Technical Accessibility

Description: In the case of Concerto for Orchestra, Béla Bartók transcribed one of his most emblematic orchestral compositions to his own solo instrument, the piano. This transcription's primary function was to suffice for ballet rehearsal accompaniment for the choreography to be introduced alongside a performance of the orchestral work. György Sándor, Bartók's pupil and pianist, prepared the original manuscript for publication. Logan Skelton, pianist-composer, used this published edition as a point of departure for his own piano arrangement of the same work. György Sándor took an editorial approach to the score and followed the manuscript as literally as possible. On the other hand, Logan Skelton treated the same musical material daringly, striving for technical simplicity and a richer orchestral sound. The purpose of this study is to examine and identify the contrasting treatments pertaining to playability, text, and texture in the Bartók-Sándor edition and Skelton arrangement of the two movements, Elegia and Finale, of the Concerto for Orchestra piano arrangement.
Date: August 2016
Creator: Polgar, Eva
Partner: UNT Libraries

A Conductor's Guide to Un-Yung La's Choral Music as Reflected in Easter Cantata

Description: Un-Yung La was one of the first Korean composers of Western style choral music who used Korean folk elements in his composers. According to Un-Yung La's musical theory, which he demonstrated in Easter Cantata. Korean-style melody and rhythm were created based on Korean traditional scales and he also used Western-style harmonization. He attempted a new Korean style of expression through Sikimsae technique in Korean traditional vocal music genres: Pansori and Sijo. The purpose of this paepr is to discuss traditional Korean performance elements related to melody, harmony, and rhythm as employed in La's Easter Cantata. The study will increase the knowledge of western conductors who wish to understand Korean folk music in preparation for performance of choral works such as La's Easter Cantata.
Date: August 2016
Creator: Ryu, Hanpill
Partner: UNT Libraries

Confronting the Enemy Within: An In-Depth Study on Psychological Self-Handicapping among Collegiate Musicians

Description: Self-handicapping is a psychological behavior people engage in to protect their self-image, project a desired image to others, and to augment feelings of success and achievement. Self-handicapping occurs when individuals have a positive but uncertain self-image about their competence in an arena of life fundamental to their self-identity. Musicians have been underrepresented in self-handicapping studies; yet the very competitive nature of their education and craft, the strong identification musicians have as musicians, and the frequent challenges during all phases of development to their abilities would suggest they are extremely vulnerable to developing self-handicaps. This dissertation discusses the theoretical components of self-handicapping, the personality traits typically exhibited by high self-handicappers, causes, types, and possible motivations for self-handicapping, short and long term effects of the behavior, and the implications these concepts have to the musician community. In addition, it contains the results of an extensive survey of musicians which examines self-handicapping tendencies, depression, imposter phenomenon, and self-esteem ratings to determine 1) if musicians self-handicap, 2) how the four constructs are related to each other within the musician population, 3) if other factors concerning musicians and self-handicapping are related, 4) areas for future research. Several significant relationships involving the four constructs tested, as well as a significant difference between the self-handicapping behaviors of professional and amateur players were found.
Date: August 2016
Creator: Flowers, Michelle Clements
Partner: UNT Libraries

Singing in English in the 21St Century: a StudyComparing and Applying the Tenets of Madeleine Marshall and Kathryn Labouff

Description: The English diction texts by Madeleine Marshall and Kathryn LaBouff are two ofthe most acclaimed manuals on singing in this language. Differences in style between the two have separated proponents to be primarily devoted to one or the other. An in-depth study, comparing the precepts of both authors, and applying their principles, has resulted in an understanding of their common ground, as well as the need for the more comprehensive information, included by LaBouff, on singing in the dialect of American Standard, and changes in current Received Pronunciation, for British works, and Mid-Atlantic dialect, for English language works not specifically North American or British. Chapter 1 introduces Marshall and The Singer’s Manual of English Diction, and LaBouff and Singing and Communicating in English. An overview of selected works from Opera America’s resources exemplifies the need for three dialects in standardized English training. Chapter 2 reviews notational and diction resources, and use of the International Phonetic Association’s alphabet (IPA). Chapter 3 directly compares Marshall and LaBouff’s views of the importance of the unstressed syllable, often schwa [ә] or open I [ɪ], as vital to allowing the audience to understand the flow of the sung text, and contrasts their differences regarding < r >. Chapter 4 discusses observations in applying the tenets with singers, focusing on three arias coached for this dissertation. Chapter 5 states conclusions and opportunities for further research. Figures include materials from the Juilliard School Archives. Appendices include interviews.
Date: August 2015
Creator: Reikofski, Helen Dewey
Partner: UNT Libraries

Was There a Trumpet Sonata Before the Trumpet Sonata? an Investigation of Girolamo Fantini’s Trumpet Sonatas with Respect to Other Stile Moderno Solo Instrumental Sonatas

Description: In 1638 Girolamo Fantini wrote eight multi-sectional trumpet sonatas. This dissertation compares these sonatas with recognized stile moderno solo instrumental sonatas by Biagio Marini and Dario Castello in order to show that Fantini’s sonatas are stile moderno trumpet sonatas. This study looks at how form, texture, motivic organization, and instrumental effects function in the works of Castello, Marini, and Fantini. This comparison shows how and to what degree Fantini uses stile moderno characteristics in his works and concludes that Fantini’s sonatas are full-fledged examples of stile moderno trumpet sonatas.
Date: August 2015
Creator: Stoltzfus, Andreas M.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Cross-culture Choral Music Education: Issues for Western Choral Conductors Related to the Performance of Arabic Choral Music

Description: The concept of choral music as defined by the Western world was foreign to Arab cultures until the colonization of the Arab world began in the seventeenth century when we began to see the Western choral style emerging in the churches of the Arab world. Group singing of traditional music was done in unison or heterophonic textures. Notated part-singing is a product of colonization, Westernization, Christianization, and now globalization. In recent years, singing music in mixed or multiple voicings not of a heterophonic nature has spread beyond the churches to the secular Arab world. As choral singing has increased in the Arab world, a new genre of Arabic choral music has emerged. In order for Western conductors to effectively teach, conduct, or perform these new works, it is important for them to develop a basic understanding of traditional Arabic musical styles and pronunciation of the language, thereby making Arabic choral music more accessible and enabling it to become a part of the larger world’s musical vocabulary. This study serves as an introductory resource for non-Arab choral conductors concerning key elements related to performing Arabic choral music and provides a context for how these elements relate to this evolving choral genre. In addition, through interviews with composers and conductors of Arabic choral music, this project will further inform the reader regarding the performance of this genre.
Date: August 2015
Creator: Earnhart, Cari L.
Partner: UNT Libraries

The “Avant-pop” Style of Jacob Ter Veldhuis: Annotated Bibliography of Boombox Pieces with an Analysis of “Pimpin’” for Baritone Saxophone and Boombox

Description: JacobTV has spent over thirty years utilizing his interest in American pop culture as the muse upon which he creates his works. Sources of popular culture including commercials, television evangelists, political speeches, interviews, and urban pop songs have earned him the title of the “Andy Warhol of new music.” His contributions to classical music are significant and include works for solo instruments and voice, chamber ensembles, and large ensembles. This study serves as an annotated bibliography of selected pieces written for saxophone and boombox written by JacobTV. Chapter 2 provides a brief historical background of electronic music and chapter 3 describes JacobTV’s compositional style and vocabulary. The pieces included in the bibliography of chapter 4 are Believer (2006) for baritone saxophone and soundtrack; Billie (2003) for alto saxophone and soundtrack; Buku (2006) for alto saxophone and soundtrack; Garden of Love (2002) for soprano saxophone and soundtrack; Grab It! (1999) for tenor saxophone and soundtrack; May This Bliss Never End (1996) for tenor saxophone, piano, and soundtrack; TaTaTa (1998) for tenor and baritone saxophone and soundtrack; Heartbreakers (1997-98) for saxophone quartet, soundtrack, and video; Jesus Is Coming (2003) for saxophone quartet and soundtrack; Pitch Black (1998) for saxophone quartet and soundtrack; and Take A Wild Guess (2007) for saxophone quartet and soundtrack. In addition, chapter 5 provides a detailed analysis of JacobTV’s composition Pimpin’ and offers further insight into his “avant-pop” compositional style.
Date: August 2015
Creator: Roberts, Sarah L.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Collaborative Crossover: Identifying Classical Vocal Collaborative Piano Practices in Jazz Vocal Accompanying

Description: Classical vocal collaborative piano and jazz vocal accompaniment are well-established fields with long-standing performance traditions. Classical collaborative performance practices have been researched and codified, but jazz accompanying practices largely remain in the domain of aural tradition. Both classical and jazz accompaniment share associated practices, such as rubato, transposition, and attention to lyric diction and inflection, but there is little previous investigation into the idea that classical collaborative practices might apply to jazz accompanying. This research examines jazz piano accompanying practices in sung verses of standard tunes to demonstrate how accomplished jazz pianists intuitively use many of the same techniques as classical collaborative pianists to create balance with singers. Through application of expressive microtiming analysis to graphical displays of transcribed recorded performances, a strong correlation is established between the classical and jazz vocal accompanying traditions. Linking classical practices to jazz potentially creates a foundation for jazz accompanying pedagogy.
Date: August 2015
Creator: Morgenroth, David Jonathan
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Bass Clarinetist’s Pedagogical Guide to Excerpts From the Wind Band Literature

Description: Student clarinet performers often encounter bass clarinet for the first time in a high school or university wind ensemble, so it is logical for clarinet pedagogues to encourage and assist their students in learning this wind band literature. In addition to becoming familiar with this oft performed repertoire, students will develop a set of specialized bass clarinet skills that one cannot learn on soprano clarinet. These skills include increased air capacity and support, timbre consistency in differing registers, intonation tendencies of the lower instrument, voicing flexibility, right hand thumb dexterity for keys that do not exist on soprano clarinet, technical facility for eleven pinky keys (as opposed to the seven pinky keys on a typical soprano clarinet, and effective altissimo fingerings. The purpose, then, of this document is to provide a performance guide for select bass clarinet solo excerpts from the wind band literature and to provide supplemental exercises intended to help students acquire the specialized bass clarinet skill set they will need in order to perform the selected excerpts successfully. The solos discussed in this document are excerpted from H. Owen Reed’s La Fiesta Mexicana, Florent Schmitt’s Dionysiaques, Percy Grainger’s Lincolnshire Posy, Frank Ticheli’s Blue Shades, William Bolcom’s First Symphony for Band, and Andrew Rindfleisch’s The Light Fantastic.
Date: August 2015
Creator: Bland, Britni Cheyenne
Partner: UNT Libraries

A Study on Hybrid Style and Orchestration in Bright Sheng’s Postcards

Description: Bright Sheng (b. 1955) has won international acclaim for successfully fusing disparate musical elements in his works. Listeners can trace Chinese pentatonic scales and instrumental effects mixed with Western classical structures. Postcards (1997) is a well-received orchestral work that successfully merges diverse musical styles and compositional techniques. Sheng based Postcards on material from his Four Movements for Piano Trio (1990). He applies masterful and distinctive orchestration to transform the chamber work into a multi-layered and colorful orchestral canvas. He fuses polyrhythm and post-tonal compositional techniques such as polytonality with Chinese musical elements, including folk song quotations, pentatonic scales and extended instrumental effects. The resulting hybrid is an outstanding artistic work that warrants further discussion and analysis for deeper understanding This study provides an overview of Sheng’s life experience and educational background in Chapter 1. Chapter 2 and 3 present a detailed analysis of the important compositional attributes and orchestration techniques Sheng applies in Postcards. Chapter 4 provides important performance considerations for conductors to enhance preparation. With an understanding of Sheng’s hybrid style, it is hoped that conductors will have a better interpretative grasp to lead an informed performance and scholars will have a better context for Sheng’s orchestral compositions.
Date: August 2015
Creator: Lee, Hsuan-Yu
Partner: UNT Libraries

Music for the Saxophone Duet Genre: an Annotated Bibliography of Selected Original Music

Description: In 1861, Jerôme Savari (1819-1870) composed Duo for Soprano Saxophone and Alto Saxophone. Since then, more than 400 duets were written, yet many musicians are not aware of this repertoire. The lack of recommended repertoire and insufficient information regarding this genre reduces the use of the saxophone duet in both pedagogical and concert settings. The purpose of this study is to examine the importance of the saxophone duet genre by identifying the standard repertoire and creating an annotated bibliography. Twenty-three composers with twenty-six selected works have been identified and will be annotated. All selected works in this document are (1) composed for any two members of the saxophone family; (2) originally composed for saxophone duet (i.e., no transcriptions will be included); (3) published either by companies or by the composers themselves; and, (4) composed between the nineteenth-century through present day. This annotated bibliography of selected repertoire contains two sections: (1) repertoire for performance; and, (2) repertoire for pedagogy. It is the intent of this project that the annotation for each piece could assist performers, teachers and students with their search of currently published works for this genre. The descriptive information in each annotation regarding the composition and its performance considerations should provide further details in order to assist in the program decision-making process.
Date: August 2015
Creator: Chien, Wei-Lun
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Mystery of the “Althorn (Alto Horn) Sonata” (1943) by Paul Hindemith

Description: A unique and significant composition, the Althorn Sonata by Paul Hindemith contains several enigmas and anomalies: details about the premiere remain unknown; scored for the alto horn, a band instrument of the late nineteenth and early twentieth century, the piece seldom finds itself performed on that instrument; although Hindemith composed his instrumental sonatas as composition exercises, for the instruments he intended to use in his large-scale works, his sonata for alto horn marks an unusual exception; the work evolves through Baroque sonata da chiesa form; a Morse code message from a Renaissance painter appears in the second movement, along with references to numerology; and, after the third movement, the horn player and pianist recite a poem, penned by the composer, which becomes musically depicted in the final movement. Hindemith’s apparent fondness, for the art of word play, proves the inspiration for enigmas and anomalies found in this sonata. The key to his mystery lies in plain sight: “Alt” translates as both “alto” and “old.” The purpose of this dissertation is to unveil to the musical world, especially to horn and saxophone players, the several enigmas and anomalies found in Hindemith’s Althorn Sonata. By exposing the nature and depth of this mystery, it will illuminate the intellectual prowess of Paul Hindemith, elevating his Althorn Sonata to a place it deserves in the horn repertoire.
Date: August 2015
Creator: Hemken, Jennifer Ann
Partner: UNT Libraries

Physical Problems in Vibrato Amongst First-year College Violinists: a Descriptive Study

Description: The purpose of this descriptive study was to first identify to what extent first-year college violinists physically struggle with the vibrato motion, and further, to identify physical problems within the motion that are contributing to their challenges during the learning process. The 16 participants in this study were chosen randomly from the College Music Society Directory of Music Faculties in Colleges and Universities (2013-2014 edition). Participants completed a questionnaire of 32 quantitative and qualitative questions addressing the vibrato of their 2013-2014 first-year violinists. 62% of participants’ first-year students had a physical problem with vibrato, 70% of participants’ students were working on correcting physical problems in vibrato during lessons. Participants also reported that 15% of their students were not able to create a vibrato motion at all. Almost all professors (n=15) indicated that students with a problematic vibrato were too tense in parts of the arm or hand and this negatively affected the motion and thus, the sound. Specific problems also included vibrato being too narrow, but rarely too wide, vibrato being too fast or too slow caused by tension, problems with when and how vibrato was being applied, problems with maintaining intonation before or during use of vibrato, and problems with not understanding the motion needed or imagining an intended sound. Most professors used movement terminology to describe physical problems with vibrato as well as aural problems with vibrato. Only a few professors discussed aural problems in vibrato using terminology depicting the sound. Participants revealed that the most commonly used types of vibrato amongst their first-year students were arm vibrato and a combination vibrato (use of wrist, arm and finger vibratos). Most participants also listed these combined parts of finger, wrist and arm in their own definitions of a good-sounding vibrato. Results from this study can be directed to the ...
Date: August 2015
Creator: Manfredi, Zo Hurd
Partner: UNT Libraries

Exploring the Integration of Thai Traditional Music in Chakra by Narong Prangchareon, with a Conductor’s Guide

Description: This dissertation explores the integration of Thai traditional music in Chakra, for wind band, by Narong Prangchareon. Nipat Kanchanahud explores how Narong, inspired by Eastern philosophy, integrates elements of Thai traditional music and the types, styles, scales, and dialects of Thai culture with the formal elements of Western music and the instrumentation of the Western wind band. Chakra uniquely spans Eastern and Western cultures, creating a new musical language for both worlds to appreciate and enjoy. Further, the composition richly demonstrates the viability of the wind band as an international medium. The orchestration of Chakra reveals Narong’s musical lineage from Edgard Varèse through Chen Yi. A conductor’s guide, included with this dissertation, is designed to aid and encourage performances of Chakra throughout the world.
Date: August 2015
Creator: Kanchanahud, Nipat
Partner: UNT Libraries

Two Keyboard Sonatas of Johann Christian Bach and Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach: A Historical Perspective

Description: After examining biographical and stylistic influences on the work of J. C. Bach and C. P. E. Bach, this study analyzes and compares the two sonatas under discussion. Each sonata is placed in historical perspective by relating its outstanding formal and stylistic features with conservative Baroque or more progressive Classical tendencies. In addition to the recorded performance of the Sonata in E-Major, Op. 5, by Johann Christian Bach, and the Sonata in G-Major from Fur Kenner und Liebhaber, Vol. 1, by Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach, this dissertation includes three tape recordings of selected piano works of D. Scarlatti, F. Haydn, W. A. Mozart, L. V. Beethoven, F. Schubert, F. Mendelssohn, F. Liszt, S. Rachmaninoff, and C. Debussy.
Date: August 1979
Creator: Sherwood, Anne Kathryn
Partner: UNT Libraries

Concertino for Orchestra

Description: Concertino consists of two movements, Paean and Dithyramb, either of which may be performed independently. Paean, a work of calm and majestic intensity, is characterized by a rhythmic pulse which is more consistently regular than that of the Dithyramb. Its three major sections form an arch, the final measures (mm. 87-95) returning to the material of the opening (mm. 1-14). The first section begins quietly, Maestoso ma sostenuto, in a very slow tempo. The activity and intensity increase until a brief, more active middle section begins in a faster tempo (Ancora piu mosso, m. 55). A fff climax (m. 63) begins in the third section (Tempo I). After a brief poco piu mosso (mm. 72-81), the opening tempo is restored (m. 82), the opening material returns (m. 87) and the final chord fades away. Dithyramb is a free and dramatic movement in which the musical material of the wind group usually contrasts with that of the string group. The piano, which has its own material, occasionally takes on the character of one group or the other as though mediating the conflict.
Date: August 1984
Creator: Schimmel, David M.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Richmond Matteson: Euphonium Innovator, Teacher and Performer, with Three Recitals of Selected Works By Frescobaldi, Bach, Saint-Saens, Hutchinson, White and Others.

Description: An examination is conducted of the life, career and musical styles of Richmond Matteson, an influential jazz euphonium and tuba performer of the twentieth century. The study includes a brief history of the euphonium's role in concert bands. A description of Matteson's background as a musician and clinician including education, influences and career changes will also be discussed. Analysis of Matteson's improvisational style and a transcription from the recording Dan's Blues is included. A formal analysis of Claude T. Smith's Variations for Baritone is provided, as well as a brief biography of the composer. Matteson's stylistic traits which Smith employed for the composition of Variations for Baritone are illustrated. The conclusion calls for further study of jazz styles by euphoniumists with more frequent performances of Variations for Baritone. Appendices include lists of Matteson's compositions and arrangements, a selected discography and a list of clinics and performances from 1982-1992.
Date: August 1997
Creator: Dickman, Marc
Partner: UNT Libraries

Analysis of the re-orchestrations of Robert Schumann's four symphonies employed by Felix Weingartner: with four recitals of selected works by Schumann, Beethoven, Tchaikovsky, Poulenc, Bizet, Rossini, and Chabrier

Description: An analysis of re-orchestrations of Robert Schumann's four symphonies employed by conductor Felix Weingartner (1863-1942). The text includes a brief history of Schumann's orchestral writing career and an overview of Weingartner's life as a conductor. The bulk of the dissertation discusses actual changes suggested by Weingartner (with score examples). Patterns of modifications are identified and discussed as they relate to historically entrenched problems perceived with Schumann's originally employed practices of orchestration. The analysis focuses on overall patterns of alteration imposed by Weingartner and their perceived effectiveness in achieving a noticeably improved aural outcome.
Date: August 1997
Creator: Cummings, Ronn (Ronn Thomas)
Partner: UNT Libraries

An Analysis of the Attempted Amalgamation of Western and Chinese Musical Elements in Huang Anlun's Piano Concerto in G Minor, Opus 25b, a Lecture Recital, Together with Three Recitals of Selected Works by Bach. Beethoven, Chopin, Liszt. Mozart, Schubert. and Schumann

Description: While China possesses one of the world's richest musical heritages, it remained unaffected by Western music until early in this century. Subsequently, there was a movement of nationalism in music approximately three decades after the introduction of Western music. This movement, aimed at utilizing Western compositional techniques to create musical works that still would be uniquely Chinese, continues even today. Huang's piano concerto was written in 1982, just a few years after the Cultural Revolution. At the time, most Chinese composers were "handicapped" by their lack of knowledge of Western contemporary music and by their limited study of both Western and Chinese traditional forms. Huang Anlun, a composer-in-residence at the Central Opera House in Beijing, traveled to North America to study at the University of Toronto and Yale University. Subsequently his music is widely performed and well received around the world. After presenting background information on Western music in China and an introduction to basic Chinese music theory, this study has analyzed Huang's piano concerto, with a particular focus on identifying, comparing, and analyzing elements of Western and Chinese music. After a survey of the formal structure of the concerto, this study has discussed Chinese modality and Western harmony--the two most important factors in the conception of Huang's concerto. A comparative study between Chinese folk songs and the thematic materials in Huang's concerto is followed by a discussion on "imitations" of Chinese instruments. The study has also examined Western compositional techniques incorporated into this concerto, such as thematic transformation, contrapuntal writing, cyclic procedure, as well as atonal and serial techniques. Through a detailed analysis, this study attempts to demonstrate how Huang has blended Western and Chinese musical syntaxes to create an artistic work that is also uniquely Chinese.
Date: August 1997
Creator: Pei, Yushu
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Re-Unification of Dr. Edwin Fissinger's Prairie Scenes: A Choral Cycle

Description: Edwin Fissinger (1920-1990) was a conductor and prolific choral composer. His compositional techniques, settings of text, jazz-influenced harmonies, and melodic propulsion fulfill an important role in each of his compositions. In the eight choral cycles he composed, Fissinger unified each cycle through thematic and textual elements. Although this resulted in a logical progression of poetry and music, Fissinger's final choral cycle, Prairie Scenes, was not published as he intended. Rather, individual selections from the cycle were published by two different publishing houses, out of sequence, and sixteen years apart. Consequently, the eight pieces are not currently performed together. Today's choral conductors, singers, and audience do not fully appreciate the value of this choral cycle and cannot understand its intended context. It is necessary to provide an in-depth investigation of the original eight-piece work Prairie Scenes: A Choral Cycle to place the appropriate organizational set together. This study illustrates the importance of the unification of Fissinger's Prairie Scenes: A Choral Cycle through a study of the poetry, the thematic material as it relates to the natural elements of the prairies, the manuscripts, and interviews with Fissinger's publishers and colleagues. An examination of Fissinger's compositional technique to convey the meaning of the text reveals a clear link between Prairie Scenes and the North Dakota prairies and its seasons. A description of the development of the choral cycle throughout music history and a biography of Edwin Fissinger and his compositional style are also included.
Date: August 2016
Creator: Jilek, Dean Francis
Partner: UNT Libraries

Paul Wittgenstein's Transcriptions for Left Hand: Pianistic Techniques and Performance Problems : A Lecture Recital, Together with Three Recitals of Selected Works of R. Schumann, S. Prokofiev, F. Liszt, M. Ravel, and F. Chopin

Description: Paul Wittgenstein (1887-1961) made significant contributions to the piano literature for the left hand through numerous commissioned works as well as his own transcriptions. In the transcriptions, Wittgenstein preserved the texture of two-hand music, aiming for the simulation of the original works. This requires special techniques in the performance by the left hand alone. This dissertation investigations technical means and performance problems associated with the transcriptions as well as Wittgenstein's own recordings of selections from his works. Chapter 1 serves as an introduction, providing a historical overview of the role of the left hand in two-hand piano literature. Chapter 2 gives biological information on Paul Wittgenstein and discusses the commissioned works. Chapter 3 investigates special techniques in the transcriptions, in the areas of arpeggios, widespread chords, fingering, pedaling, and others. Chapter 4 discusses Wittgensteins's performance style based on his recordings. Chapter 5 presents a conclusion pointing to the benefits of performing left-hand music in two-hand piano playing.
Date: August 1999
Creator: Kong, Won-Young
Partner: UNT Libraries