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The Trumpet Arias in the Oratorios of George Frederic Handel: A Lecture Recital; Together with Three Other Recitals

Description: The lecture was given on April 23, 1979. The discussion consisted of an exploration of the history and derivation of the Baroque idiomatic technique for trumpet to which Handel was heir. Consideration for Baroque performance practice is included along with stylistic and formal analyses of the trumpet arias that were performed. Four works were rendered; they were selected on the basis of their adaptability to the recital situation. The first recital was presented on April 24, 1970, and included solo works of Giuseppe Torelli, Geoffrey Robbins, Marcel Poot, Halsey Stevens, and Fanfares Liturgiques by Henri Tomasi which featured Mr. Morley as conductor of a sixteen member brass choir. The second recital, on February 18, 1971, featured solo works by von Oskar Bohme, Roger Goeb, Robert Weast, Merrill Ellis, and the Septet fur Biasinstrumente by Paul Hindemith. The third recital included solo works of Paul Hinderoith, Kent Kennan, Georges Enesco, and Marcel Bitsch, and was presented on August 16, 1973. All of the recitals were recorded on magnetic tape and are filed, along with the written version of the lecture material, as a part of the dissertation.
Date: August 1979
Creator: Morley, Max L.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Two Keyboard Sonatas of Johann Christian Bach and Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach: A Historical Perspective

Description: After examining biographical and stylistic influences on the work of J. C. Bach and C. P. E. Bach, this study analyzes and compares the two sonatas under discussion. Each sonata is placed in historical perspective by relating its outstanding formal and stylistic features with conservative Baroque or more progressive Classical tendencies. In addition to the recorded performance of the Sonata in E-Major, Op. 5, by Johann Christian Bach, and the Sonata in G-Major from Fur Kenner und Liebhaber, Vol. 1, by Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach, this dissertation includes three tape recordings of selected piano works of D. Scarlatti, F. Haydn, W. A. Mozart, L. V. Beethoven, F. Schubert, F. Mendelssohn, F. Liszt, S. Rachmaninoff, and C. Debussy.
Date: August 1979
Creator: Sherwood, Anne Kathryn
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Organ Works of Ottorino Respighi Together with Three Recitals of Selected Works of J. S. Bach, W. Bolcom, J. Guillou, J. Langlais, F. Liszt, C. Tournemire and L. Vierne

Description: This dissertation deals with Respighi's output for the organ which consists of the Three Preludes for organ solo, a Suite in G for strings and organ, two transcriptions (the Vitali Ciaccona, and a Suit by Bach), both for violin and organ, and various organ parts in the symphonic poems, operas, and orchestral works. If Respighi was not an innovator, he was at least creative in his use of the organ in his orchestral works. The organ was used primarily for color by adding depth, body, and novelty to the ever-growing orchestra. Respighi paid great attention to the smallest detail in his orchestrations, which were varied, delicate, and precise. Why did this interest in color and sonority not result in similar treatment of the organ in his music? The answer is suggested already in the description of the late romantic/orchestral organ. Its stops had lost their individuality, and they blended together in such a way that no particular color was distinguished. The though is not that Respighi's music, or the music of any other composer, caused the decline, but rather that the direction of organ-building in its search for modernity, machinery, and the industrial age, lost its identity, its characteristics personality and color, and lost in fact the very thing it was trying to achieve-- its autonomy.
Date: August 1979
Creator: Ferré, Susan
Partner: UNT Libraries