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Béla Bartók, Out of Doors: A Lecture Recital, Together with Three Recitals of Selected Works of L.V. Beethoven, F. Chopin, J. Brahms, R. Schumann, G. Rochberg, S. Prokofieff, M. Ravel and Others

Description: The lecture recital was given January 31, 1971. A discussion of Bartok's Out of Doors, a suite consisting of five movements entitled "With Drums and Pipes," "Barcarolla," "Musettes," "The Night's Music," and "The Chase" included biographical material, general analysis of Bartok's musical style, and specific analysis of the suite itself. The suite was then performed by memory. In addition to the lecture recital three other public recitals were performed. Two of these consisted entirely of solo literature for the piano, and the other was a vocal chamber music recital. The first solo recital was on June 7, 1970, and included works of Alfredo Casella, Beethoven, Chopin, Brahms, and Bartok. Part of the preparation included the writing of program notes of a historical and analytical nature.The other solo program, on July 5, 1971, consisted entirely of twentieth-century works by George Rochberg, Sergei Prokofieff, and Maurice Ravel. The chamber music recital was performed with a visiting soprano, Jane Paul, on February 28, 1971. Emphasis was given to German Lieder by Schumann, Joseph Marx, and Alban Berg, but Spanish songs of the Renaissance, by Juan del Encina and Fuenllana, as well as a modern English song cycle by Peter Warlock were also programmed.
Date: August 1971
Creator: Kincaid, Desmond, 1931-
Partner: UNT Libraries

Thema med Variationer, Opus 40, by Carl Nielsen: A Lecture Recital Two Solo Recitals Including Compositions of W. A. Mozart, F. Schubert, F. Chopin, A. Casella, and R. Muczynski A Chamber Music Recital Featuring Compositions for Clarinet, Viola and Piano, by W. A. Mozart, J. Brahms F. Busoni and A. Uhl

Description: The lecture recital, "Thema med Variationer, Opus 40, By Carl Nielsen" presented a discussion of the composer's general background and the characteristics of his style. Specific points made were related to the Thema med Variationer; the discussion was followed by a performance of the work in its entirety. In addition to the lecture recital, three other recital programs were organized and public concerts presented to provide the platform for the works studied. Two of these programs were of solo piano music and one was of chamber music with the clarinet and viola in partnership with the piano. All programs were recorded on magnetic recording tape. The spoken portion of the lecture recital in written form is filed with the recordings as a part of this dissertation.
Date: August 1971
Creator: Di Piazza, Gabriel, 1935-
Partner: UNT Libraries

A Background and Analysis of Selected Lieder and Opera Transcriptions of Franz Liszt. A Lecture Recital, Together with Three Recitals of Works by Chopin, Schubert, Bartok, Franck, and Other Composers

Description: An understanding of the piano transcription is basic to any proper comprehension of nineteenth-century piano music and performance practice. In this study, the transcription for solo piano is examined in relation to several musical milestones in the mid-nineteenth century, including far-reaching technical developments in the piano, the beginning and growth of the public concert, the birth of the solo piano recital, and the influence of virtuosity as a Romantic ideal. In addition, as Liszt was undoubtedly the greatest transcriber of the nineteenth century, several representative transcriptions of Liszt are analyzed and compared to their original models, including Schubert's Gretchen am Spinnrade and Auf dem Wasser zu singen, Chopin's Moja pieszczotka ("My Joys"), Wagner's Liebestod from Tristan und Isolde, and the quartet from the final act of Verdi's Rigoletto.
Date: August 1980
Creator: Gibbs, Dan Paul
Partner: UNT Libraries

Ronald Stevenson's Passacaglia on DSCH: Understanding the Composer's Unique Approach to Large-Scaled Structure, a Lecture Recital, together with Three Recitals of Selected Works of L.V. Beethoven, J. Brahms, F. Liszt, F. Mendelssohn, B. Bartók and Others

Description: This paper investigates Ronald Stevenson's unique treatment of large-scaled structure in his Passacaglia on D S C H. This piece's unusual eighty-minute length, use of traditional forms and unusual piano techniques, musical references to other cultures and a massive triple-fugue over a ground bass will be examined as they relate to its overall form. The elements of rhythm, melody/mode, harmony, counterpoint, piano techniques, and tonality are also used as means of highlighting many unifying elements of the piece which contribute to its overall cohesiveness. Tributes to other composers, among them Dimitry Shostakovich to whom the piece is dedicated, are discussed in addition to many references to world cultures and events which support Stevenson's views on what he terms world music. Rarely is a piece written that encompasses such a wide range of musical elements that possess the ability to engage an audience for an uninterrupted length of eighty-minutes. As of yet, an in-depth scholarly investigation of Stevenson's treatment of formal unity in this landmark piano work has not been done. This analysis reveals Stevenson's approach to composing in such a large form, as well as illustrating his mastery of variation, counterpoint and unending ingenuity for innovative piano techniques. The composer's background and philosophies are discussed as well as the major impact made on his compositional style by both Percy Grainger and Ferruccio Busoni.
Date: August 1994
Creator: Beckman, Bradley J. (Bradley John)
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Six Piano Sonatas of James Sellars: Aspects of Form, Rhythm, Texture, and Style

Description: James Sellars has established himself as one of America's foremost composers whose eclectic style reveals a wealth of influences. His artistic combination of various traditional and avant-garde techniques, along with his sensitive and expert craftsmanship has earned him an important position in contemporary American music. Sellars' compositional styles have encompassed neo-Romanticism, in his early days, through post-serialism and Dada to an eclectic, post-Romantic style utilizing popular elements including electro-acoustic techniques. His extensive catalog of over 150 compositions includes works for orchestra, opera, chorus, dance, chamber, voices with ensemble, solo voice, piano, instrumental solos, band, and media. Sellars' compositions for piano solo span a 38-year period and total 17 works, the most important of which are his six one-movement sonatas, which represent, according to Sellars, "a journey from modernism to post-modernism." Their value lies in their eclectic stylistic approaches, artistic nd technical challenges, and pianistic effectiveness. The first three sonatas, incorporating post-serial elements, fall into a modernist stylistic stance while numbers four through six, in postmodern style, contrast one another drastically. Sonata Brasileira, recalls the broad sweeping gestures of the Romantic period; Sonata V reveals the influence of the absurdist Dada movement; and the last sonata Patterns on a Field, blends minimalism with elements of rock music. These sonatas represent Sellars' significant contribution to the genre of the piano sonata and deserve a position among other important American piano sonatas of the twentieth century. Despite Sellars' numerous successes and highly active performance schedule, no study or research has focused on the composer or any of his works. Taken as a whole, the six sonatas represent an important yet relatively unknown body of twentieth century solo piano literature, which justifiably merit further study and performance. The aim of this dissertation is to provide an introduction to the composer and present a study ...
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Date: August 2003
Creator: Solomons, John
Partner: UNT Libraries

Copland's "Single Vision" and the Piano Sonata: A Lecture Recital, Together with Three Recitals of Selected Works of J.S. Bach, B. Bartok, L.v. Beethoven, F. Chopin, F. Liszt, W.A. Mozart, J.P. Rameau, M. Ravel, and F. Schubert

Description: Difficulties are encountered in any discussion of Copland's style, for his works cover the spectrum from harsh, dissonant works to folk music. To avoid the task of defining a style which encompasses this array of vastly different pieces, a sharp distinction is frequently made between the abstract and popular works. However, Copland has repeatedly objected to such categorization, claiming that he composed from a single vision. A careful examination of his total output proves the validity of his claim. Many common characteristics are found throughout works from all categories and time periods. These traits include a basic economy of materials, emphasis on thirds, consistent method of development, use of declamation, jazz-influenced rhythms, cyclicism, and a slow/fast/slow sequence of movements, as well as within single movements. This document uses the Piano Sonata as a model of Copland's style, for it exemplifies these characteristics more clearly than any other major piece for piano. By making numerous comparisons with other works, Copland's single vision is revealed.
Date: August 1990
Creator: Morris, Gregory W. (Gregory Wayne)
Partner: UNT Libraries

Extra-Musical Associations in Selected Pieces From Années de Pélerinage, Troisième Année, by Franz Liszt: A Lecture Recital, Together with Three Recitals of Selected Works of D. Scarlatti, F.J. Haydn, L.v. Beethoven, F. Schubert, F. Chopin, J. Brahms, R. Schumann, and Others

Description: Volumes one and two of Annees de Pelerinage contain travel impressions. The pieces in volume three serve as a means of expressing a religious pilgrimage. The religiousmeaning is implied by the titles and by letters Liszt wrote concerning specific pieces. For the pieces to have programmatic significance, the music must support the verbal clues. This dissertation maintains that selected pieces in Annees de Pelerinage III are programmatic and that Liszt provided musical clues that have not been discovered or, if noticed, have not been analyzed in detail. Also, the dissertation explores similarities between selected pieces of Annees de Pelerinage III and other programmatic or texted works by Liszt sharing the same subject. The findings reinforce the premise that Liszt deliberately intended to express certain extra-musical ideas within the music itself. The paper briefly analyzes the musical reasons for labeling Annees de Pelerinaae III a cycle. Different sources call these pieces cyclic, citing the shared common religious theme as the reason. This dissertation discusses musical reasons that reinforce the idea of a cycle. Chapter II discusses Liszt's views on program music. Chapter III identifies common themes in Liszt's programmatic works and discusses the symbolic significance of thematic transformation. Chapter IV suggests an approach to analyzing program music. Chapter V discusses Liszt's musical narrative and his use of common rhetorical devices. Chapter VI analyzes extra-musical associations in selected pieces from the Annees de Pelerinaae—Troisieme Annee. Five pieces have been selected for analysis—Anaelus1. Aux Cypres de la Villa d'Este I and II, Marche funebre. and Sursum corda.
Date: August 1990
Creator: Lively, Judy Sharon
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Influence of Chinese Folk and Instrumental Music on Tcherepnin's "Chinese mikrokosmos": A Lecture Recital, Together with Three Recitals of Selected Works of J.S. Bach, W.A. Mozart, C. Debussy, S. Rachmaninoff, D. Shostakovich, and Others

Description: One of the most important compositional theories of Alexander Tcherepnin (1899-1977), Russian-American composer and pianist, is the Eurasian ideology, which was a result of the influence of Eastern culture. Inspired by this theory, Tcherepnin not only extricated himself from his own compositional techniques, but also intensified his search for musical folklore. In April, 1934, he began a world tour which was to include China, Japan, Singapore, the Philippines, Egypt, and Palestine, to search for "musical folklore." He became so fascinated with the culture of ancient China that he cancelled the rest of his arrangements, and, except for visits to Japan, he remained in China for three years, until the outbreak of the Sino-Japanese War in July, 1937. During his three-year stay in China, Tcherepnin was greatly attracted to Chinese culture, and as a result, Chinese culture influenced his music to a significant degree. This essay examines the manner in which Tcherepnin's music was influenced by his experiences in China. In order to precisely analyze the close affiliation between Chinese musical elements and Tcherepnin's "Chinese Mikrokosmos," many original Chinese sources proved indispensable in this study. These sources include Chinese folk music, theater music, instrumental music, religious music, and Chinese periodicals and newspapers that reported Tcherepnin's activities in China (1934-7). The organization of this dissertation as follows: Chapter I provides a brief biographical sketch of Tcherepnin, traces his activities in China, and introduces one of his greatest "Chinese" compositions, "Chinese Mikrokosmos," which represents the fruits of his labors to scrutinize and absorb Chinese musical language. Chapters II and III are devoted to exploring how Chinese folk and instrumental music inspired Tcherepnin's "Chinese Mikrokosmos." Chapter IV summarizes this study.
Date: August 1988
Creator: Luo, Yeou-Huey
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Late Piano Works of Franz Liszt, a Lecture Recital, Together with Three Recitals of Selected Works

Description: The lecture recital was given April 2, 1973. A discussion of Liszt's late piano works included information about specific compositional techniques and innovations which influenced twentieth-century composers. Five selections of the late works were performed by memory. In addition to the lecture recital, three public solo recitals were performed. The first solo recital, performed on April 9, 1972, consisted of works by Haydn, Beethoven, Ravel, and Chopin. The second solo recital, performed on August 4, 1974, included works by Beethoven, Debussy, and Brahms. The final solo recital, performed on April 5, 1976, consisted of works by Bach, Chopin, and Prokofieff. All four programs were recorded on magnetic tape and are filed, along with the written version of the lecture recital, as part of the dissertation.
Date: August 1976
Creator: Marchionni, Raymond
Partner: UNT Libraries

Two Keyboard Sonatas of Johann Christian Bach and Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach: A Historical Perspective

Description: After examining biographical and stylistic influences on the work of J. C. Bach and C. P. E. Bach, this study analyzes and compares the two sonatas under discussion. Each sonata is placed in historical perspective by relating its outstanding formal and stylistic features with conservative Baroque or more progressive Classical tendencies. In addition to the recorded performance of the Sonata in E-Major, Op. 5, by Johann Christian Bach, and the Sonata in G-Major from Fur Kenner und Liebhaber, Vol. 1, by Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach, this dissertation includes three tape recordings of selected piano works of D. Scarlatti, F. Haydn, W. A. Mozart, L. V. Beethoven, F. Schubert, F. Mendelssohn, F. Liszt, S. Rachmaninoff, and C. Debussy.
Date: August 1979
Creator: Sherwood, Anne Kathryn
Partner: UNT Libraries