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The AGS synchrotron with four helical magnets

Description: The idea of using two partial helical magnets was applied successfully to the AGS synchrotron to preserve the proton beam polarization. In this paper we explore in details the idea of using four helical magnets placed symmetrically in the AGS ring. The placement of four helical magnets in the AGS ring provides many advantages over the present setup of the AGS which uses two partial helical magnets. First, the symmetric placement of the four helical magnets allows for a better control of the AGS optics with reduced values of the beta functions especially near beam injection, second, the vertical spin direction during beam injection and extraction is closer to vertical, and third, it provides for a larger 'spin tune gap', which allows the vertical and horizontal tunes to be placed, and prevent the horizontal and vertical intrinsic spin resonances of the AGS to occur during the acceleration cycle. Although the same spin gap can be obtained with a single or two partial helices, the required high field strength of a single helix makes its use impractical, and that of the double helix rather difficult. In this paper we will provide results on the spin tune and on the optics of the AGS with four partial helical magnets, and compare these results with the present setup of the AGS that uses two partial helical magnets.
Date: May 20, 2012
Creator: N., Tsoupas; Huang, H.; Roser, T.; MacKay, W.W. & Trbojevic, D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Chromatic analysis and possible local chromatic correction in RHIC

Description: In this article we will answer the following questions for the RHIC polarized proton (p-p) and Au-Au run lattices: (1) what are the sources of second order chromaticities? (2) what is the dependence of second order chromaticity on the on-momentum {beta}-beat? (3) what is the dependence of second order chromaticity on {beta}* at IP6 and IP8? To answer these questions, we use the perturbation theory to numerically calculate the contributions of each quadrupole and sextupole to the first, second, and third order chromaticities. Possible local methods to reduce chromatic effects in RHIC ring are shortly discussed.
Date: March 28, 2011
Creator: Luo, Y.; Fischer, W.; Gu, X. & Trbojevic, D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Coherent electron cooling demonstration experiment

Description: Coherent electron cooling (CEC) has a potential to significantly boost luminosity of high-energy, high-intensity hadron-hadron and electron-hadron colliders. In a CEC system, a hadron beam interacts with a cooling electron beam. A perturbation of the electron density caused by ions is amplified and fed back to the ions to reduce the energy spread and the emittance of the ion beam. To demonstrate the feasibility of CEC we propose a proof-of-principle experiment at RHIC using SRF linac. In this paper, we describe the setup for CeC installed into one of RHIC's interaction regions. We present results of analytical estimates and results of initial simulations of cooling a gold-ion beam at 40 GeV/u energy via CeC. We plan to complete the program in five years. During first two years we will build coherent electron cooler in IP2 of RHIC. In parallel we will develop complete package of computer simulation tools for the start-to-end simulation predicting exact performance of a CeC. The later activity will be the core of Tech X involvement into the project. We will use these tools to predict the performance of our CeC device. The experimental demonstration of the CeC will be undertaken in years three to five of the project. The goal of this experiment is to demonstrate the cooling of ion beam and to compare its measured performance with predictions made by us prior to the experiments.
Date: September 4, 2011
Creator: Litvinenko, V.N.; Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Brutus, J.C.; Fedotov, A.; Hao, Y. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

FEL potential of eRHIC

Description: Brookhaven National Laboratory plans to build a 5-to-30 GeV energy-recovery linac (ERL) for its future electron-ion collider, eRHIC. In past few months, the Laboratory turned its attention to the potential of this unique machine for free electron lasers (FELS), which we initially assessed earlier. In this paper, we present our current vision of a possible FEL farm, and of narrow-band FEL-oscillators driven by this accelerator. eRHIC, the proposed electron-ion collider at BNL, takes advantage of the existing Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) complex. Plans call for adding a six-pass super-conducting (SRF) ERL to this complex to collide polarized- and unpolarized- electron beams with heavy ions (with energies up to 130 GeV per nucleon) and with polarized protons (with energies up to 325 GeV). RHIC, with a circumference of 3.834 km, has three-fold symmetry and six straight sections each {approx} 250 m long. Two of these straight sections will accommodate 703-MHz SRF linacs. The maximum energy of the electron beam in eRHIC will be reached in stages, from 5 GeV to 30 GeV, by increasing the lengths of its SRF linacs. We plan to install at the start the six-pass magnetic system with small gap magnets. The structure of the eRHIC's electron beam will be identical with that of its hadron beam, viz., 166 bunches will be filled, reserving about a one-microsecond gap for the abort kicker. With modest modifications, we can assure that eRHIC's ERL will become an excellent driver for continuous wave (CW) FELs (see Fig.1). The eRHIC's beam structure will support the operation of several such FELs in parasitic mode.
Date: August 23, 2010
Creator: Litvinenko, V.N.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Hao, Y.; Kao, C-C.; Kayran, D.; Murphy, J.B. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Comparison of accelerator technologies for use in ADSS

Description: Accelerator Driven Subcritical (ADS) fission is an interesting candidate basis for nuclear waste transmutation and for nuclear power generation. ADS can use either thorium or depleted uranium as fuel, operate below criticality, and consume rather than produce long-lived actinides. A case study with a hypothetical, but realistic nuclear core configuration is used to evaluate the performance requirements of the driver proton accelerator in terms of beam energy, beam current, duty factor, beam distribution delivered to the fission core, reliability, and capital and operating cost. Comparison between a CW IC and that of a SRF proton linac is evaluated. Future accelerator R&D required to improve each candidate accelerator design is discussed. ADS fission has interesting potential for electric power generation and also for destruction of long-lived actinide waste produced by conventional critical reactors. ADS systems offer several interesting advantages in comparison to critical reactors: (1) ADS provides greater flexibility for the composition and placement of fissile, fertile, or fission product waste within the core, and require less enrichment of fissile content; (2) The core can be operated with a reactivity k{sub eff} that cannot reach criticality by any failure mode; (3) When the beam is shut off fission ceases in the core; (4) Coupling the fast neutron spectrum of the spallation drive to fast core neutronics offers a basis for more complete burning of long-lived actinides; and (5) ADS designs can provide sufficient thermal mass that meltdown cannot occur from radioactive heat after fission is stopped. In order to drive a {approx}GW{sub e} fission core a CW proton beam of >700 MeV and {approx}15 MW beam power is required. A previous study of the accelerator performance required for ADS systems concluded that present accelerator performance is approaching those requirements, but accelerator system cost and reliability remain particular concerns. The obvious candidates ...
Date: March 28, 2011
Creator: Weng, W.T.; Ludewig, H.; Raparia, D.; Trbojevic, D.; Todosow, M.; McIntyre, P. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

High luminosity electron-hadron collider eRHIC

Description: We present the design of a future high-energy high-luminosity electron-hadron collider at RHIC called eRHIC. We plan on adding 20 (potentially 30) GeV energy recovery linacs to accelerate and to collide polarized and unpolarized electrons with hadrons in RHIC. The center-of-mass energy of eRHIC will range from 30 to 200 GeV. The luminosity exceeding 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} can be achieved in eRHIC using the low-beta interaction region with a 10 mrad crab crossing. We report on the progress of important eRHIC R&D such as the high-current polarized electron source, the coherent electron cooling, ERL test facility and the compact magnets for recirculation passes. A natural staging scenario of step-by-step increases of the electron beam energy by building-up of eRHIC's SRF linacs is presented.
Date: March 28, 2011
Creator: Ptitsyn, V.; Aschenauer, E.; Bai, M.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The effects of betatron phase advances on beam-beam and its compensation in RHIC

Description: In this article we perform simulation studies to investigate the effects of betatron phase advances between the beam-beam interaction points on half-integer resonance driving term, second order chromaticty and dynamic aperture in RHIC. The betatron phase advances are adjusted with artificial matrices inserted in the middle of arcs. The lattices for the 2011 RHIC polarized proton (p-p) run and 2010 RHIC Au-Au runs are used in this study. We also scan the betatron phase advances between IP8 and the electron lens for the proposed Blue ring lattice with head-on beam-beam compensation.
Date: March 28, 2011
Creator: Luo, Y.; Fischer, W.; Gu, X.; Tepikian, S. & Trbojevic, D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Medium energy heavy ion operations at RHIC

Description: As part of the search for a phase transition or critical point on the QCD phase diagram, an energy scan including 5 different energy settings was performed during the 2010 RHIC heavy ion run. While the top beam energy for heavy ions is at 100 GeV/n and the lowest achieved energy setpoint was significantly below RHICs injection energy of approximately 10 GeV/n, we also provided beams for data taking in a medium energy range above injection energy and below top beam energy. This paper reviews RHIC experience and challenges for RHIC medium energy operations that produced full experimental data sets at beam energies of 31.2 GeV/n and 19.5 GeV/n. The medium energy AuAu run covered two beam energies, both above the RHIC injection energy of 9.8 GeV but well below the standard store energy of 100 GeV (see table 1). The low energy and full energy runs with heavy ions in FY10 are summarized in [1] and [2]. Stochastic Cooling ([3]) was only used for 100 GeV beams and not used in the medium energy run. The efficiency of the transition from 100 GeV operation to 31.2 GeV and then to 19.5 GeV was remarkable. Setup took 32 h and 19 h respectively for the two energy settings. The time in store, defined to be the percentage of time RHIC provides beams in physics conditions versus calendar time, was approximately 52% for the entire FY10 heavy ion run. In both medium energy runs it was well above this average, 68% for 31.5 GeV and 82% for 19.5 GeV. For both energies RHIC was filled with 111 bunches with 1.2 10{sup 9} and 1.3 10{sup 9} ions per bunch respectively.
Date: March 28, 2011
Creator: Drees, K.A.; Ahrens, L.; Bai, M.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Blackler, I.M.C.; Blaskiewicz, M. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Proof-of-principle experiment for FEL-based coherent electron cooling

Description: Coherent electron cooling (CEC) has a potential to significantly boost luminosity of high-energy, high-intensity hadron-hadron and electron-hadron colliders. In a CEC system, a hadron beam interacts with a cooling electron beam. A perturbation of the electron density caused by ions is amplified and fed back to the ions to reduce the energy spread and the emittance of the ion beam. To demonstrate the feasibility of CEC we propose a proof-of-principle experiment at RHIC using SRF linac. In this paper, we describe the setup for CeC installed into one of RHIC's interaction regions. We present results of analytical estimates and results of initial simulations of cooling a gold-ion beam at 40 GeV/u energy via CeC. We plan to complete the program in five years. During first two years we will build coherent electron cooler in IP2 of RHIC. In parallel we will develop complete package of computer simulation tools for the start-to-end simulation predicting exact performance of a CeC. The later activity will be the core of Tech X involvement into the project. We will use these tools to predict the performance of our CeC device. The experimental demonstration of the CeC will be undertaken in years three to five of the project. The goal of this experiment is to demonstrate the cooling of ion beam and to compare its measured performance with predictions made by us prior to the experiments.
Date: August 21, 2011
Creator: Litvinenko, V.N.; Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Brutus, J.C.; Fedotov, A.; Hao, Y. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Lattice design for the future ERL-based electron hadron colliders eRHIC and LHeC

Description: We present a lattice design of a CW Electron Recovery Linacs (ERL) for future electron hadron colliders eRHIC and LHeC. In eRHIC, an six-pass ERL installed in the existing Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) tunnel will collide 5-30 GeV polarized electrons with RHIC's 50-250 (325) GeV polarized protons or 20-100 (130) GeV/u heavy ions. In LHeC a stand-along, 3-pass 60 GeV CW ERL will collide polarized electrons with 7 TeV protons. After collision, electron beam energy is recovered and electrons are dumped at low energy. Two superconducting linacs are located in the two straight sections in both ERLs. The multiple arcs are made of Flexible Momentum Compaction lattice (FMC) allowing adjustable momentum compaction for electrons with different energies. The multiple arcs, placed above each other, are matched to the two linac's straight sections with splitters and combiners.
Date: March 28, 2011
Creator: Trbojevic, D.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Hao, Y.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Ptitsyn, V.; Kayran, D. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Optics-free x-ray FEL oscillator

Description: There is a need for an Optics-Free FEL Oscillators (OFFELO) to further the advantages of free-electron lasers and turning them in fully coherent light sources. While SASE (Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission) FELs demonstrated the capability of providing very high gain and short pulses of radiation and scalability to the X-ray range, the spectra of SASE FELs remains rather wide ({approx}0.5%-1%) compared with typical short wavelengths FEL-oscillators (0.01%-0.0003% in OK-4 FEL). Absence of good optics in VUV and X-ray ranges makes traditional oscillator schemes with very high average and peak spectral brightness either very complex or, strictly speaking, impossible. In this paper, we discuss lattice of the X-ray optics-free FEL oscillator and present results of initial computer simulations of the feedback process and the evolution of FEL spectrum in X-ray OFFELO. We also discuss main limiting factors and feasibility of X-ray OFFELO.
Date: March 28, 2011
Creator: Litvinenko, V.N.; Hao, Y.; Kayran, D. & Trbojevic, D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

RHIC performance for FY2011 Au+Au heavy ion run

Description: Following the Fiscal Year (FY) 2010 (Run-10) Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) Au+Au run, RHIC experiment upgrades sought to improve detector capabilities. In turn, accelerator improvements were made to improve the luminosity available to the experiments for this run (Run-11). These improvements included: a redesign of the stochastic cooling systems for improved reliability; a relocation of 'common' RF cavities to alleviate intensity limits due to beam loading; and an improved usage of feedback systems to control orbit, tune and coupling during energy ramps as well as while colliding at top energy. We present an overview of changes to the Collider and review the performance of the collider with respect to instantaneous and integrated luminosity goals. At the conclusion of the FY 2011 polarized proton run, preparations for heavy ion run proceeded on April 18, with Au+Au collisions continuing through June 28. Our standard operations at 100 GeV/nucleon beam energy was bracketed by two shorter periods of collisions at lower energies (9.8 and 13.5 GeV/nucleon), continuing a previously established program of low and medium energy runs. Table 1 summarizes our history of heavy ion operations at RHIC.
Date: September 4, 2011
Creator: Marr, G.; Ahrens, L.; Bai, M.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Blackler, I.; Blaskiewicz, M. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

RHIC Polarized proton operation

Description: The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) operation as the polarized proton collider presents unique challenges since both luminosity(L) and spin polarization(P) are important. With longitudinally polarized beams at the experiments, the figure of merit is LP{sup 4}. A lot of upgrades and modifications have been made since last polarized proton operation. A 9 MHz rf system is installed to improve longitudinal match at injection and to increase luminosity. The beam dump was upgraded to increase bunch intensity. A vertical survey of RHIC was performed before the run to get better magnet alignment. The orbit control is also improved this year. Additional efforts are put in to improve source polarization and AGS polarization transfer efficiency. To preserve polarization on the ramp, a new working point is chosen such that the vertical tune is near a third order resonance. The overview of the changes and the operation results are presented in this paper. Siberian snakes are essential tools to preserve polarization when accelerating polarized beams to higher energy. At the same time, the higher order resonances still can cause polarization loss. As seen in RHIC, the betatron tune has to be carefully set and maintained on the ramp and during the store to avoid polarization loss. In addition, the orbit control is also critical to preserve polarization. The higher polarization during this run comes from several improvements over last run. First we have a much better orbit on the ramp. The orbit feedback brings down the vertical rms orbit error to 0.1mm, much better than the 0.5mm last run. With correct BPM offset and vertical realignment, this rms orbit error is indeed small. Second, the jump quads in the AGS improved input polarization for RHIC. Third, the vertical tune was pushed further away from 7/10 snake resonance. The tune feedback maintained the ...
Date: March 28, 2011
Creator: Huang, H.; Ahrens, L.; Alekseev, I.G.; Aschenauer, E.; Atoian, G.; Bai, M. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

THE RHIC HYDROGEN JET LUMINESCENCE MONITOR.

Description: A hydrogen jet polarimeter was developed for the RHIC accelerator to improve the process of measuring polarization. Particle beams intersecting with gas molecules can produce light by the process known as luminescence. This light can then be focused, collected, and processed giving important information such as size, position, emittance, motion, and other parameters. The RHIC hydrogen jet polarimeter was modified in 2005 with specialized optics, vacuum windows, light transport, and a new camera system making it possible to monitor the luminescence produced by polarized protons intersecting the hydrogen beam. This paper describes the configuration and preliminary measurements taken using the RHIC hydrogen jet polarimeter as a luminescence monitor.
Date: June 25, 2007
Creator: RUSSO,T.; BELLAVIA, S.; GASSNER, D.; THIEBERGER, P.; TRBOJEVIC, D. & TSANG, T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

MUON ACCELERATION WITH THE RACETRACK FFAG

Description: Muon acceleration for muon collider or neutrino factory is still in a stage where further improvements are likely as a result of further study. This report presents a design of the racetrack non-scaling Fixed Field Alternating Gradient (NS-FFAG) accelerator to allow fast muon acceleration in small number of turns. The racetrack design is made of four arcs: two arcs at opposite sides have a smaller radius and are made of closely packed combined function magnets, while two additional arcs, with a very large radii, are used for muon extraction, injection, and RF accelerating cavities. The ends of the large radii arcs are geometrically matched at the connections to the arcs with smaller radii. The dispersion and both horizontal and vertical amplitude fictions are matched at the central energy.
Date: June 25, 2007
Creator: TRBOJEVIC,D.; EBERHARD, K. & SESSLER, A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

SUPERCONDUCTING NON-SCALING FFAG GANTRY FOR CARBON-PROTON CANCER THERAPY

Description: We report on improvements in the non-scaling Fixed Field Alternating Gradient (FFAG) gantry design. As we previously reported, a major challenge of the carbodproton cancer therapy facilities is isocentric gantry design. The weight of the isocentric gantry transport elements in the latest Heidelberg carbon/proton facility is 135 tons. In this report we detail improvements to the previous non-scaling gantry design. We estimate that this non-scaling FFAG gantry would be almost hundred times lighter than traditional heavy ion gantries. Very strong focusing with small dispersion permits passage of different energies of carbon beams through the gantry's fixed magnetic field.
Date: June 25, 2007
Creator: TRBOJEVIC,D.; GUPTA, R.; PARKER, B.; KEIL, E. & SESSLER, A.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

OBSERVATION OF EXPERIMENTAL BACKGROUND IN RHIC POLARIZED PROTON RUN 2006.

Description: The beam-gas has affected STAR background in RHIC proton Run 2005, but not in Run 2006. With higher beam intensity in Run 2008, the beam-gas effect at STAR may be of concern. The ratio of ZDC background and coincident rate seems to be useful in proton runs in evaluating the experimental background.
Date: June 25, 2007
Creator: ZHANG,S. & TRBOJEVIC, D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

IBS suppression lattice in RHIC: theory and experimental verification

Description: Intra-beam scattering (IBS) is the limiting factor of the luminosity lifetime for Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) operation with heavy ions. Over the last few years the process of IBS was carefully studied in RHIC with dedicated IBS measurements and their comparison with the theoretical models. A new lattice was recently designed and implemented in RHIC to suppress transverse IBS growth, which lowered the average arc dispersion by about 20% [1]. This lattice became operational during RHIC Run-8. We review the IBS suppression mechanism, IBS measurements before and after the lattice change, and comparisons with predictions.
Date: August 25, 2008
Creator: Fedotov,A.V.; Bai, M.; Bruno, D.; Cameron, P.; Connolly, R.; Cupolo, J. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

ACCELERATION OF ELECTRONS WITH THE RACETRACK NON-SCALING FFAG FOR E-RHIC

Description: The future relativistic electron hadron collider: e-RHIC requires acceleration of electrons to 10 GeV. In the case that the super conducting linac is selected for acceleration, an energy recovery scheme is required. We propose to study a possibility of using the non-scaling Fixed-Field Gradient-Accelerator (NS-FFAG) for different energies. The beam will be accelerated by the superconducting linac at the top of the sine function, brought back to the front of the linac by the non-scaling FFAG and repeating this few times until the total energy of 20 GeV is reached. After collisions the beam is brought back by the non-scaling FFAG and decelerated (on the lower RF phase) in the same sequence but in the reverse order. Conventional and non-conventional beam dynamic issues will be discussed, like the transit time matching effect and the time of flight adjustments.
Date: June 25, 2007
Creator: TRBOJEVIC,D.; BLASKIEWICZ, M.; LITVINENKO, V.; PTITSYN, V. & ROSER, T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

BEAM-BASED SEXTUPOLE POLARITY VERIFICATION IN THE RHIC

Description: This article presents a beam-based method to check RHIC arc sextupole polarities using local horizontal orbit three-bumps at injection energy. We use 11 bumps in each arc, each covering two SFs (focusing sextupoles) and one SD (defocusing sextupole). If there are no wrong sextupole polarities, the tune shifts from bump to bump and the tune shift patterns from arc to arc should be similar. Wrong sextupole polarities can be easily identified from mismatched signs or amplitudes of tune shifts from bump to bump and/or from arc to arc. Tune shifts in both planes during this study were tracked with a high-resolution base-band tunemeter (BBQ) system. This method was successfully used to the sextupole polarity check in RHIC Blue and Yellow rings in the RHIC 2006 and 2007 runs.
Date: June 25, 2007
Creator: LUO,Y.; SATOGATA, T.; CAMERON, P.; DELLAPENNA, A. & TRBOJEVIC, D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

ELECTRON CLOUD OBSERVATIONS AND CURES IN RHIC.

Description: Abstract Not Provided
Date: April 9, 2007
Creator: FISCHER,W.; BLASKIEWICZ, M.; BRENNAN, M.; HUANG, H.; HSEUH, H.C.; PTITSYN, V. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

ELECTRON CLOUD OBSERVATIONS AND CURES IN RHIC.

Description: Since 2081 MIC has experienced electron cloud effects, which have limited the beam intensity. These include dynamic pressure rises - including pressure instabilities, tune shifts: electrons, a reduction of the stability threshold for bunches crossing the transition energy, and possibly slow emittance growth. We summarize the main observations in operation and dedicated experiments, as well as countermeasures including baking, NEG coated warm beam pipes, solenoids, bunch patterns, anti-grazing rings, pre-pumped cold beam pipes, and scrubbing.
Date: March 1, 2007
Creator: FISCHER,W.; BLASKIEWICZ, M.; HUAN, H.; HSEUH, H.C.; PTITSYN, V.; ROSER, T. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Experience with IBS-suppression lattice in RHIC

Description: An intra-beam scattering (IBS) is the limiting factor of the luminosity lifetime for RHIC operating with heavy ions. In order to suppress the IBS we designed and implemented new lattice with higher betatron tunes. This lattice had been developed during last three years and had been used for gold ions in yellow ring of the RHIC during d-Au part of the RHIC Run-8. The use of this lattice allowed both significant increases in the luminosity lifetime and the luminosity levels via reduction of beta-stars in the IPS. In this paper we report on the development, the tests and the performance of IBS-suppression lattice in RHIC, including the resulting increases in the peak and the average luminosity. We also report on our plans for future steps with the IBS suppression.
Date: June 23, 2008
Creator: Litvinenko,V.N.; Luo, Y.; Ptitsyn, V.; Satogata, T.; Tepikian, S.; Bai, M. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Transfer of polarized 3He ions in the AtR beam transfer line

Description: In addition to collisions of electrons with various unpolarized ion species as well as polarized protons, the proposed electron-hadron collider (eRHIC) will facilitate the collisions of electrons with polarized {sup 3}He ions. The AGS is the last acceleration stage, before injection into one of the RHIC's collider ring for final acceleration. The AtR (AGS to RHIC) transfer line will be utilized to transport the polarized {sup 3}He ions from AGS into one of the RHIC's collider rings. Some of the peculiarities of the AtR line's layout (simultaneous horizontal and vertical bends) may degrade the matching of the stable spin direction of the AtR line with that of RHIC's. In this paper we discuss possible simple modifications of the AtR line to accomplish a perfect matching of the stable spin direction of the injected {sup 3}He beam with the stable spin direction at the injection point of RHIC.
Date: May 20, 2012
Creator: N., Tsoupas; MacKay, W.W.; Meot, F.; Roser, T. & Trbojevic, D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department