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Quench Protection for the MICE Cooling Channel CouplingMagnet

Description: The MICE coupling coil is fabricated from Nb-Ti, which hashigh quench propagation velocities within the coil in all directionscompared to coils fabricated with other superconductors such as niobiumtin. The time for the MICE coupling coil to become fully normal throughnormal region propagation in the coil is shorter than the time needed fora safe quench (as defined by a hot-spot temperature that is less than 300K). A MICE coupling coil quench was simulated using a code written at theInstitute of Cryogenics and Superconductive Technology (ICST) at theHarbin Institute of Technology (HIT). This code simulates quench backfrom the mandrel as well as normal region propagation within the coil.The simulations included sub-division of the coil. Each sub-division hasa back to back diodes and resistor across the coil. Current flows in theresistor when there is enough voltage across the coil to cause current toflow through the diodes in the forward direction. The effects of thenumber of coil sub-divisions and the value of the resistor across thesub-division on the quench were calculated with and without quench back.Sub-division of the coupling coil reduces the peak voltage to ground, thelayer-to-layer voltage and the magnet hot-spot temperature. Quench backreduces the magnet hot-spot temperature, but the peak voltage to groundand layer-to-layer voltage are increased, because the magnet quenchesfaster. The resistance across the coil sub-division affects both thehot-spot temperature and the peak voltage to ground.
Date: November 20, 2007
Creator: Green, M.A.; Wang, L. & Guo, X.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Some options for the muon collider capture and decay solenoids

Description: This report discusses some of the problems associated with using solenoid magnets to capture the secondary particles that are created when an intense beam of 8 to 10 GeV protons interacts with the target at the center of the capture region. Hybrid capture solenoids with inductions of 28 T and a 22T are described. The first 14 to 15 T of the solenoid induction will be generated by a superconducting magnet. The remainder of the field will be generated by a Bitter type of water cooled solenoid. The capture solenoids include a transition section from the high field solenoid to a 7 T decay channel where pions and kaons that come off of the target decay into muons. A short 7 T solenoidal decay channel between the capture solenoid system and the phase rotation system is described. A concept for separation of negative and positive pions and kaons is briefly discussed.
Date: November 1, 1995
Creator: Green, M.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The effect of muon decay on the design of dipoles and quadrupoles for a muon collider

Description: The decay of muons to neutrinos and electrons can cause heating in the superconducting dipoles and quadrupoles in the muon collider acceleration rings and the colliding beam ring. The problem is particularly acute in the colliding beam ring where heating in the magnets can be high as 2.4 kW per meter in the bending magnets of muon collider ring with 2 TeV mu minus beams with 2.22{times}10{sup 12} particles per bunch at a repetition rate of 30 Hz. The energy deposited within the helium temperature region must be reduced at least three orders of magnitude in order for the refrigeration system to begin to keep up with the heat load. Beam heating from muon decay will require changes in dipole design from traditional cosine theta (or intersecting ellipse) design used in the SSC magnets. Some dipole and quadrupole design options are presented in this report for both the accelerator rings and the colliding beam rings.
Date: November 1, 1995
Creator: Green, M.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Use of high current density superconducting coils in fusion devices

Description: Superconducting magnets will play an important role in fusion research in years to come. The magnets which are currently proposed for fusion research use the concept of cryostability to insure stable operation of the superconducting coils. This paper proposes the use of adiabatically stable high current density superconducting coils in some types of fusion devices. The advantages of this approach are much lower system cold mass, enhanced cryogenic safety, increased access to the plasma and lower cost. (MOW)
Date: November 1, 1979
Creator: Green, M.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

2 meg-ampere prototype levitated coil for multipole fusion

Description: The coils major diameter is 1.0 meter and it occupies a cross-section which is about 0.2 meter minor in diameter. The prototype coil will carry four times the current of the largest such magnet built to date. As a result, the peak induction in the coil is about 8 T and the stored magnetic energy will be around 3 MJ. The paper describes the proposed Nb/sub 3/SN superconductor, the quench protection system which is based on the LBL shorted secondary concept, the isochroic refrigeration storage system which stores about 5 kJ of refrigeration between 4.5/sup 0/K and 7/sup 0/K, and the persistent switch.
Date: November 1, 1979
Creator: Green, M.A. & Glueck, R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Modeling the behavior of oriented permanent magnet material using current double theory

Description: This paper presents a method for modeling two dimensional dipoles, quadrupoles and other higher multipoles built using oriented permanent magnet materials such as samarium cobalt (one of the rare earth cobalt REC materials). The technique presented here uses complex current doublet to model the magnetized material. This technique can be used in conjunction with an infinitely permeable circular iron shield which lies outside the REC material. Examples of two types of dipoles and quadrupoles are presented in this report. 15 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.
Date: November 1, 1987
Creator: Green, M.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department