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Laboratory evaluation of colloidal actinide transport at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP): 1. crushed-dolomite column flow...

Description: Colloid-facilitated transport of Pu, Am, U, Th, and Np has been recognized as a potentially important phenomenon affecting the performance of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) facility being developed for safe disposal of transuranic radioactive waste. In a human intrusion scenario, actinide-bearing colloidal particles may be released from the repository and be transported by brines (approximately 0.8 to 3 molal ionic strength) through the Culebra, a thin fractured microcrystalline (mean grain size 2 micrometers) dolomite aquifer overlying the repository. Transport experiments were conducted using sieved, uniformly packed crushed Culebra rock or nonporous dolomite cleavage rhombohedra. Experiments with mineral fragments and fixed and live WIPP-relevant bacteria cultures showed significant levels of retardation due to physical filtration effects. Humic substances were not attenuated by the Culebra dolomite. Comparison of elution curves of latex microspheres in columns prepared with microcrystalline rock and nonporous rock showed minimal effect of Culebra micropores on colloid transport. These data form part of the basis to parameterize numerical codes being used to evaluate the performance of the WIPP.
Date: December 31, 1996
Creator: Yelton, W.G.; Behl, Y.K.; Kelly, J.W.; Dunn, M.; Gillow, J.B.; Francis, A.J. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Enumeration of Microbial Populations in Radioactive Environments by Epifluorescence Microscopy

Description: Epifluorescence microscopy was utilized to enumerate halophilic bacterial populations in two studies involving inoculated, actual radioactive waste/brine mixtures and pure brine solutions. The studies include an initial set of experiments designed to elucidate potential transformations of actinide-containing wastes under salt-repository conditions, including microbially mediated changes. The first study included periodic enumeration of bacterial populations of a mixed inoculum initially added to a collection of test containers. The contents of the test containers are the different types of actual radioactive waste that could potentially be stored in nuclear waste repositories in a salt environment. The transuranic waste was generated from materials used in actinide laboratory research. The results show that cell numbers decreased with time. Sorption of the bacteria to solid surfaces in the test system is discussed as a possible mechanism for the decrease in cell numbers. The second study was designed to determine radiological and/or chemical effects of {sup 239}Pu, {sup 243}Am, {sup 237}Np, {sup 232}Th and {sup 238}U on the growth of pure and mixed anaerobic, denitrifying bacterial cultures in brine media. Pu, Am, and Np isotopes at concentrations of <=1 x 10{sup {minus}5}M, <=5 x 10{sup {minus}6}M and <=5 x 10{sup {minus}4}M respectively, and Th and U isotopes <=4 x 10{sup {minus}3}M were tested in these media. The results indicate that high actinide concentration affected both the bacterial growth rate and morphology. However, relatively minor effects from Am were observed at all tested concentrations with the pure culture.
Date: December 2, 1996
Creator: Pansoy-Hjelvik, M.E.A.; Strietelmeierr, B.A.; Paffett, M.T.; Kitten, S.M.; Leonard, P.A.; Dunn, M. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Interaction of Plutonium with Bacteria in the Repository Environment

Description: Microorganisms in the nuclear waste repository environment may interact with plutonium through (1) sorption, (2) intracellular accumulation, and (3) transformation speciation. These interactions may retard or enhance the mobility of Pu by precipitation reactions, biocolloid formation, or production of more soluble species. Current and planned radioactive waste repository environments, such as deep subsurface halite and granite formations, are considered extreme relative to life processes in the near-surface terrestrial environment. There is a paucity of information on the biotransformation of radionuclides by microorganisms present in such extreme environments. In order to gain a better understanding of the interaction of plutonium with microorganisms present in the waste repository sites we investigated a pure culture (Halomonas sp.) and a mixed culture of bacteria (Haloarcula sinaiiensis, Marinobacter hydrocarbonoclasticus, Altermonas sp., and a {gamma}-proteobacterium) isolated from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site and an Acetobacterium sp. from alkaline groundwater at the Grimsel Test Site in Switzerland.
Date: July 1, 2000
Creator: Gillow, J. B.; Francis, A. J.; Lucero, D. A. & Papenguth, H. W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

ACTINIDE BIOCOLLOID FORMATION IN BRINE BY HALOPHILIC BACTERIA

Description: The authors examined the ability of a halophilic bacterium (WIPP 1A) isolated from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site to accumulate uranium in order to determine the potential for biocolloid facilitated actinide transport. The bacterial cell surface functional groups involved in the complexation of the actinide were determined by titration. Uranium, added as uranyl nitrate, was removed from solution at pH 5 by cells but at pH 7 and 9 very little uranium was removed due to its limited solubility. Although present as soluble species, uranyl citrate at pH 5, 7, and 9, and uranyl carbonate at pH 9 were not removed by the bacterium because they were not bioavailable due to their neutral or negative charge. Addition of uranyl EDTA to brine at pH 5, 7, and 9 resulted in the immediate precipitation of U. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis revealed that uranium was not only associated with the cell surface but also accumulated intracellularly as uranium-enriched granules. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis of the bacterial cells indicated the bulk sample contained more than one uranium phase. Nevertheless these results show the potential for the formation of actinide bearing bacterial biocolloids that are strictly regulated by the speciation and bioavailability of the actinide.
Date: November 9, 1998
Creator: GILLOW,J.B.; FRANCIS,A.J.; DODGE,C.J.; HARRIS,R.; BEVERIDGE,T.J.; BRADY,P.B. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Role of Microbes as Biocolloids in the Transport of Actinides from a Deep Underground Radioactive Waste Repository

Description: We investigated the interaction of dissolved actinides Th, U, Np Zgpu, and Am, with a pure and a mixed culture of halophilic bactezia isolated from the Waste Isolation H.Iot Plant repository under anaerobic conditions to evaluate their potentiaI transport as biocolloids from the waste site. The sizes of the bacterial cells studied ranged from ().54 x 0.48 pm to 7.7 x 0.67pm Using sequential mimofiltration, we determined the ~~ation of actinides with fi-ee-living (mobile) bacterial cells suspended in a fluid medium containing. NaCl or M=W12 brine, at various phaes of their growth cycIes. The number of suspended kcteria rangy-d born 106 to 109 cells ml-*. Tine amount of actinide associatd with the wspend~ cell fraction (cakzdated & mol cell-*) was very Iow: Th, 10-*2; U, 10-1s - 10-lS; - ~ Np, 1o-15- 10-19; Pu, 10-ls -10-21 ; and h, 10-1* - 10-*9 ; and it varied with the bacteihl - CUIture studied. l%e differe&es in the asswiation are amibuted to the extent of bioamxmdation and biosorption by the bacteria pH, the compo&on of the brine, and the speziation and bioavaiIability of the actinides.
Date: December 17, 1998
Creator: Dodge, C.J.; Dunn, M.; Francis, A.J.; Gillow, J.B.; Mantione, K.; Pansoy-Hjelvik, M.E. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Actinide Biocolloid Formation in Brine by Halophilic Bacteria

Description: We examined the ability of a halophilic bacterium (WFP 1A) isolated from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site to accumulate uranium in order to determine the potential for biocolloid facilitated actinide transport. The bacterial cell Surface functional groups involved in the complexation of the actinide were determined by titration. Uranium, added as uranyl nitrate, was removed from solution at pH 5 by cells but at pH 7 and 9 very little uranium was removed due to its limited volubility. Although present as soluble species, uranyl citrate at pH 5, 7, and 9, and uranyl carbonate at pH 9 were not removed by the bacterium because they were not bioavailable due to their neutral or negative charge. Addition of uranyl EDTA to brine at pH 5, 7, and 9 resulted in the immediate precipitation of U. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis revealed that uranium was not only associated with the cell surface but also accumulated intracellulary as uranium-enriched granules. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis, of the bacterial cells indicated the bulk sample contained more than one uranium phase. Nevertheless these results show the potential for the formation of actinide bearing bacterial biocolloids that are strictly regulated by the speciation and bioavailability of the actinide.
Date: July 28, 1999
Creator: Gillow, J.B.; Francis, A.J.; Dodge, C.J.; Harris, R.; Beveridge, T.J.; Brady, P.V. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Microbial transformation of uranium in wastes

Description: Contamination of soils, water, and sediments by radionuclides and toxic metals from the disposal of uranium processing wastes is a major national concern. Although much is known about the physico- chemical aspects of U, we have little information on the effects of aerobic and anaerobic microbial activities on the mobilization or immobilization of U and other toxic metals in mixed wastes. In order to understand the mechanisms of microbial transformations of uranium, we examined a contaminated pond sediment and a sludge sample from the uranium processing facility at Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, TN. The uranium concentration in the sediment and sludge samples was 923 and 3080 ug/g dry wt, respectively. In addition to U, the sediment and sludge samples contained high levels of toxic metals such as Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Pb, Ni, and Zn. The association of uranium with the various mineral fractions of the sediment and sludge was determined by selective chemical extraction techniques. Uranium was associated to varying degrees with the exchangeable carbonate, iron oxide, organic, and inert fractions in both samples. Initial results in samples amended with carbon and nitrogen indicate immobilization of U due to enhanced indigenous microbial activity under anaerobic conditions. 23 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.
Date: January 1, 1989
Creator: Francis, A.J.; Dodge, C.J.; Gillow, J.B.; Cline, J.E. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA) & Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, TN (USA))
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The application of XPS to the study of MIC

Description: The biotic and abiotic factors that contribute to Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion (MIC) involve the transformation of chemical species at a metal surface. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) is utilized in conjunction with conventional microbiological and Quantitative Chemical Analytical techniques to better understand the effect of environmental conditions on microbial behavior as well as the ability of bacteria to alter local environmental conditions. Specifically, the interaction of Fe, Cr, Ni, Mo ions with Desulfovibrio sp. under anoxic conditions were studied. This is the first phase of a systematic study of microbial activity and the effects of alloy elements and thermo-mechanical treatments on the MIC resistance of stainless steels.
Date: January 1, 1992
Creator: Kearns, J.R. (Allegheny Ludlum Corp., Brackenridge, PA (United States). Technical Center); Clayton, C.R.; Halada, G.P. (State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States). Dept. of Materials Science); Gillow, J.B. & Francis, A.J. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States))
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The application of XPS to the study of MIC

Description: The biotic and abiotic factors that contribute to Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion (MIC) involve the transformation of chemical species at a metal surface. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) is utilized in conjunction with conventional microbiological and Quantitative Chemical Analytical techniques to better understand the effect of environmental conditions on microbial behavior as well as the ability of bacteria to alter local environmental conditions. Specifically, the interaction of Fe, Cr, Ni, Mo ions with Desulfovibrio sp. under anoxic conditions were studied. This is the first phase of a systematic study of microbial activity and the effects of alloy elements and thermo-mechanical treatments on the MIC resistance of stainless steels.
Date: January 1, 1992
Creator: Kearns, J. R.; Clayton, C. R.; Halada, G. P.; Gillow, J. B. & Francis, A. J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department