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High Rate for Type IC Supernovae

Description: Using an automated telescope we have detected 20 supernovae in carefully documented observations of nearby galaxies. The supernova rates for late spiral (Sbc, Sc, Scd, and Sd) galaxies, normalized to a blue luminosity of 10{sup 10} L{sub Bsun}, are 0.4 h{sup 2}, 1.6 h{sup 2}, and 1.1 h{sup 2} per 100 years for SNe type la, Ic, and II. The rate for type Ic supernovae is significantly higher than found in previous surveys. The rates are not corrected for detection inefficiencies, and do not take into account the indications that the Ic supernovae are fainter on the average than the previous estimates; therefore the true rates are probably higher. The rates are not strongly dependent on the galaxy inclination, in contradiction to previous compilations. If the Milky Way is a late spiral, then the rate of Galactic supernovae is greater than 1 per 30 {+-} 7 years, assuming h = 0.75. This high rate has encouraging consequences for future neutrino and gravitational wave observatories.
Date: September 1, 1991
Creator: Muller, R.A.; Marvin-Newberg, H.J.; Pennypacker, Carl R.; Perlmutter, S.; Sasseen, T.P. & Smith, C.K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Radio-Frequency Beam Conditioner for Fast-Wave Free-Electron Generators of Coherent Radiation

Description: A method for conditioning electron beams is proposed, making use of the TM{sub 210} mode of microwave cavities, to reduce the axial velocity spread within the beam, in order to enhance gain in resonant electron beam devices, such as the free-electron laser (FEL). Effectively, a conditioner removes the restriction on beam emittance. The conditioner is analyzed using a simple model for beam transport and ideal RF cavities. Analysis of an FEL is employed to evaluate performance with reduced axial velocity spread. Examples of FELs are presented showing the distinct advantage of conditioning.
Date: July 1, 1991
Creator: Sessler, Andrew M.; Whittum, D.H. & Yu, L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Standing-Wave Free-Electron Laser Two-Beam Accelerator

Description: A free-electron laser (FEL) two-beam accelerator (TBA) is proposed, in which the FEL interaction takes place in a series of drive cavities, rather than in a waveguide. Each drive cavity is 'beat-coupled' to a section of the accelerating structure. This standing-wave TBA is investigated theoretically and numerically, with analyses included of microwave extraction, growth of the FEL signal through saturation, equilibrium longitudinal beam dynamics following saturation, and sensitivity of the microwave amplitude and phase to errors in current and energy. It is found that phase errors due to current jitter are substantially reduced from previous versions of the TBA. Analytic scalings and numerical simulations are used to obtain an illustrative TBA parameter set.
Date: February 1, 1991
Creator: Sessler, Andrew M.; Whittum, D.H.; Wurtele, Jonathan S.; Sharp, W.M. & Makowski, M.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Phase stability of a standing-wave free-electron laser

Description: The standing-wave free-electron laser (FEL) differs from a conventional linear-wiggler microwave FEL in using irises along the wiggler to form a series of standing-wave cavities and in reaccelerating the beam between cavities to maintain the average energy. The device has been proposed for use in a two-beam accelerator because microwave power can be extracted more effectively than from a traveling-wave FEL. A simplified numerical simulation indicates that, with appropriate prebunching, the standing-wave FEL can produce an output signal that is effectively the same in all cavities. However, changes in the beam energy of less than 1% are found to introduce unacceptably large fluctuations of signal phase along the device. Analytic calculations and single-particle simulations are used here to show that the phase fluctuations result from beam synchrotron motion in the initial signal field, and an approximate analytic expression for the signal phase is derived. Numerical simulations are used to illustrate the dependence of phase fluctuations on the beam prebunching, the beam-current axial profile, and the initial signal amplitude.
Date: January 1, 1991
Creator: Sharp, W.M.; Rangarajan, G.; Sessler, A.M. & Wurtele, J.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Some Aspects of the Two Beam Performance of DCI

Description: The results of beam-beam simulations that model DCI operating as an e{sup +}e{sup -} collider are reported. The simulation techniques, including a new procedure for incorporating synchrotron radiation, are described. Phase advance errors between the interaction points explain the beam-beam limit at the operating point q{sub x} = q{sub y} = 0.725 (q denotes the fractional part of the tune). The effects of radiation damping are also studied near that operating point. Simulation and experiments disagree in a second operating region, q{sub x} = q{sub y} {approx} 0.795, indicating additional physics outside the scope of our model.
Date: September 1, 1991
Creator: Krishnagopal, S. & Siemann, R.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Prompt Bunch by Bunch Synchrotron Oscillation Detection via a Fast Phase Measurement

Description: An electronic system is presented which detects synchrotron oscillations of individual bunches with 4 ns separation. The system design and performance are motivated by the requirements of the proposed B Factory facility at SLAC. Laboratory results are presented which show that the prototype is capable of measuring individual bunch phases with better than 0.5 degree resolution at the 476 MHz RF frequency.
Date: May 1, 1991
Creator: Briggs, D.; Corredoura, P.; Fox, J.D.; Giousmousis, A.; Hosseini, W.; Klaisner, L. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Quadrupole Magnets for the SSC Collider

Description: A 40 mm bore 211 T/m quadrupole magnet has been designed and tested at LBL. There are 8 coils of 30 strand cable arranged in 2 layers in a cos 2{theta} distribution, supported by 18 mm thick collars, preassembled into 146 mm long packs, and rigidly aligned in a cold-iron yoke. The design, construction details, and test results are given for three 1 m models and the first 5 m model.
Date: June 1, 1991
Creator: Taylor, C.E.; Barale, P.; Benjegerdes, R.; Caspi, S.; Dell'Orco, D.; Fritz, D. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Coherent Beam-Beam Interactions in Electron-Positron Colliders

Description: We present the results of a new calculational technique that evaluates the beam-beam force due to an arbitrary charge distribution. We find coherent instabilities that dominate at certain operating points and depend strongly on the degree of damping in the system. We conclude that while these resonances may play a significant role for colliders with low damping, with a careful choice of operating points they should present no danger to the new generation of high luminosity heavy-quark factories under design.
Date: August 1, 1991
Creator: Krishnagopal, S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Debunching and Capture in the LEB for the SSC

Description: The authors present the details of the capture process in the Low Energy Booster (LEB) for the SSC. They consider only the longitudinal dynamics. Space charge forces are computed quasistatically. The beam pipe is considered to be perfectly conducting. With respect to maximizing the capture efficiency and minimizing the space charge tune spread, initial few milliseconds are very important. They present only the first few milliseconds of the cycle, during which space charge effects are significant. For the numerical simulation they use the code ESME.
Date: May 1, 1991
Creator: Mahale, N. & Furman, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Apiary B Factory Lattice Design

Description: The Apiary B Factory is a proposed high-intensity electron-positron collider. This paper presents the lattice design for this facility, which envisions two rings with unequal energies in the PEP tunnel. The design has many interesting optical and geometrical features due to the needs to conform to the existing tunnel, and to achieve the necessary emittances, damping times and vacuum. Existing hardware is used to a maximum extent.
Date: May 3, 1991
Creator: Donald, M.H.R. & Garren, A.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

APIARY B-Factory Separation Scheme

Description: A magnetic beam-separation scheme for an asymmetric-energy B Factory based on the SLAC electron-positron collider PEP is described that has the following properties: the beams collide head-on and are separated magnetically with sufficient clearance at the parasitic crossing points and at the septum, the magnets have large beam-stay-clear apertures, synchrotron radiation produces low detector backgrounds and acceptable heat loads, and the peak {beta}-function values and contributions to the chromaticities in the IR quadrupoles are moderate.
Date: May 3, 1991
Creator: Garren, A. & Sullivan, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Canonical Representations sp (2n, R)

Description: In this paper, we study a rather unconventional real basis for the real symplectic algebra sp(2n,R). We demonstrate the utility of this basis for practical computations by giving a simple derivation of the second and fourth order indices of irreducible representations of sp(2n,R).
Date: August 1, 1991
Creator: Rangarajan, G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Estimating the Cost of Superconducting Magnets and the Refrigerators Needed to Keep Them Cold

Description: The cost of superconducting magnets and the refrigerators needed to keep them cold can be estimated if one knows the magnet stored energy and the amount of refrigeration needed. This report updates the cost data collected over 20 years ago by Strobridge and others. Early cost data has been inflated into 1991 dollars and data on newer superconducting magnets has been added to the old data. The cost of superconducting magnets has been correlated with stored energy and field-magnetic volume product. The cost of the helium refrigerator cold box and the compressors needed to keep the magnet cold can be correlated with the refrigeration generated at 4.5K. The annual cost of 4.5K refrigeration can be correlated with 4.5K refrigeration and electrical energy cost.
Date: June 1, 1991
Creator: Green, M. A.; Byrns, R. & St. Lorant, S. J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Application of the Yoshida-Ruth Techniques to Implicit Integration and Multi-Map Explicit Integration

Description: The full power of Yoshida's technique is exploited to produce an arbitrary order implicit symplectic integrator and multi-map explicit integrator. This implicit integrator uses a characteristic function involving the force term alone. Also we point out the usefulness of the plain Ruth algorithm in computing Taylor series map using the techniques first introduced by Berz in his 'COSY-INFINITY' code.
Date: April 1, 1991
Creator: Forest, E.; Bengtsson, J. & Reusch, M.F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

An Isochronous Lattice for PEP

Description: With e{sup +}e{sup -} storage rings operating in a quasi-isochronous mode, it might be possible to produce short bunches with length {sigma}{sub z} < 1 cm. The unique characteristics of the short bunches could then be utilized for synchrotron radiation applications or colliders with mm-scale {beta}*. In principle, the design of a quasi-isochronous storage ring is relatively straight-forward, but experimental studies with electron storage rings in this configuration have not been carried out. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate that an isochronous lattice design is compatible with PEP given a minimum of hardware modifications.
Date: April 1, 1991
Creator: Corbett, W.J.; Donald, M.H.R. & Garren, A.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Two-phase flow visualization and relative permeability measurement in transparent replicas of rough-walled rock fractures

Description: Understanding and quantifying multi-phase flow in fractures is important for mathematical and numerical simulation of geothermal reservoirs, nuclear waste repositories, and petroleum reservoirs. While the cubic law for single-phase flow has been well established for parallel-plate fractures theoretically and experimentally, no reliable measurements of multi-phase flow in fractures have been reported. This work reports the design and fabrication of an apparatus for visualization of two-phase flow and for measurement of gas-liquid relative permeability in realistic rough-walled rock fractures. A transparent replica of a natural rock fracture from a core specimen is fabricated by molding and casting in clear epoxy. Simultaneous flow of gas and liquid with control of capillary pressure at inlet and outlet is achieved with the Hassler ''sandwich'' design: liquid is injected to the fracture through a porous block, while gas is injected directly to the edge of the fracture through channels in the porous block. A similar arrangement maintains capillary separation of the two phases at the outlet. Pressure drops in each phase across the fracture, and capillary pressures at the inlet and outlet, are controlled by means of pumps and needle valves, and are measured by differential and absolute pressure transducers. The clear epoxy cast of the natural fracture preserves the geometry of the fracture and permits visual observation of phase distributions. The fracture aperture distribution can be estimated by filling the fracture with a dyed liquid, and making pointwise measurements of the intensity of transmitted light. A set of two-phase flow experiments has been performed which has proven the viability of the basic experimental design, while also suggesting further improvements in the apparatus. Preliminary measurements are presented for single-phase permeability to liquid, and for relative permeabilities in simultaneous flow of liquid and gas.
Date: January 1, 1991
Creator: Persoff, P.; Pruess, K. & Myer, L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Influence of Subslab Aggregate Permeability of SSV Performance

Description: The effectiveness of the technique of subslab ventilation (SSV) for limiting radon entry into basements was investigated through complementary experimentation and numerical modeling. Determination of the impact of subslab aggregate permeability on SSV performance was a primary objective. Subslab pressure fields resulting from SSV were measured in six well-characterized basements, each with a different combination of soil and aggregate permeability. The relationship between air velocity and pressure gradient within the three types of aggregate installed beneath the basement slabs was measured in the laboratory. A new numerical model of SSV was developed and verified with the field data. This model simulates non-Darcy flow in the aggregate. We demonstrate that non-Darcy effects significantly impact SSV performance. Field data and numerical simulations indicate that increasing the aggregate permeability within the investigated range of 2 x 10{sup -8} m{sup 2} to 3 x 10{sup -7} m{sup 2} substantially improves the extension of the subslab pressure field due to SSV operation. Subslab pressure field extension also improves as soil permeability decreases between 10{sup -9} m{sup 2} and 10{sup -10} m{sup 2}. With a slab-wall gap thickness of 1 mm and the range of aggregate permeability investigated, further reductions in soil permeability do not significantly improve the subslab pressure field extension. Sealing of cracks in the slab and excavation of a small pit where the SSV pipe penetrates the slab also dramatically improve this pressure field extension. A large ratio of aggregate permeability to soil permeability reduces the need for large depressurizations at the SSV pit. Our findings are consistent with the results of prior field studies; however, our understanding of SSV is improved and the dependence of SSV performance on the relevant parameters can now be quantified with the model.
Date: September 1, 1991
Creator: Gadgil, A.J.; Bonnefous, Y.C.; Fisk, W.J.; Prill, R.J. & Nematollahi, A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Measurements of Retractable Gas-Cooled 6061 Aluminum ElectricalLeads Operating in a Vacuum

Description: To charge and discharge the ASTROMAG superconducting magnet in space requires retractable gas-cooled leads which must operate in a vacuum. This report describes the design and test of 500 ampere retractable gas-cooled leads made from 6061-T4 aluminum tubes. Aluminum is attractive for gas-cooled electrical leads in space because of its low mass density and the desire for short leads. Initial tests showed that retractable gas-cooled leads could operate in a vacuum from a source of normal helium. The pressure drop through the leads was low enough to permit a superconducting magnet to be charged and discharged while the leads vent into space. The leads were stable at currents above 700 amperes. The voltage drop across the contact between the upper and lower leads was as low as 1.2 mV per lead out of a total voltage drop of 42 mV per lead when the leads carried 714 amperes. The gas required for cooling was comparable to the more conventional copper gas-cooled current leads. In a second test seven months later. The contact resistance between the lead sections had increased considerably. In the second test, the contact resistance was repeatable for one lead but not for the other.
Date: June 1, 1991
Creator: Green, M.A.; Aguiar, H.; Bensadoun, M.J.; Gibson, J.H.; Heine,D.L.; Levin, S. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Astromag Superconducting Magnet Facility Configured for a FreeFlying Satellite

Description: ASTROMAG is a particle astrophysics facility that was originally configured for the Space Station. The heart of the ASTROMAG facility is a large superconducting magnet which is cooled using superfluid helium. The task of resizing the facility so that it will fly in a satellite in. a high angle of inclination orbit is driven by the launch weight capability of the launch rocket and the desire to be able to do nearly the same physics as the Space Station version of ASTROMAG. In order to reduce the launch weight, the magnet and its cryogenic system had to be downsized, yet the integrated field generated by the magnet in the particle detectors has to match the Space Station version of the magnet. The use of aluminum matrix superconductor and oriented composite materials in the magnet insulation permits one to achieve this goal. The net magnetic dipole moment from the ASTROMAG magnet must be small to minimize the torque due to interaction with the earth's magnetic field. The ASTROMAG magnet consists of identical two coils 1.67 meters apart. The two coils are connected in series in persistent mode. Each coil is designed to carry 2.34 million ampere turns. Both coils are mounted on the same magnetic axis and they operate at opposite polarity. This reduces the dipole moment by a factor of more than 1000. This is tolerable for the Space Station version of the magnet. A magnet operating on a free flying satellite requires additional compensation. This report presents the magnet parameters of a free flying version of ASTROMAG and the parameters of the space cryogenic system for the magnet.
Date: June 1, 1991
Creator: Green, M.A. & Smoot, George F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A 2-GHz Rectangular Corrugated Horn

Description: We have designed, constructed and tested a large, rectangular horn antenna with a center frequency of 2.0 GHz, corrugated on the E-plane walls, made out of aluminum sheet. A new technique has been developed to solder thin aluminum strips onto the back plane to form the corrugations. The radiation beam pattern shows half-power beamwidths of 12{sup 0} and 14{sup 0} in the H and E planes respectively, and side lobe response below -40 dB at angles greater than 50{sup 0} from horn axis. The measured return loss is less than -20 dB (VSWR < 1.22) between 1.7 and 2.3 GHz; insertion loss is less than 0.15 dB.
Date: October 1, 1991
Creator: Bersanelli, M.; Bensadoun, M.; De Amici, Giovanni; Limon, M.; Smoot, George F.; Tanaka, S. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Two-Dimensional Carrier-Carrier Screening in a Quantum Well

Description: The behavior of carrier-carrier screening is investigated in a GaAs-GaAIAs quantum well structure by measuring the band-to-band polarization dephasing with femtosecond photon echoes. The variation of the electron-hole polarization dephasing time with the carrier concentration reveals the two-dimensional character of the short range screening between the interacting carriers.
Date: July 1, 1991
Creator: Bigot, J.-Y.; Portella, M.T.; Schoenlein, R.W.; Cunningham, J.E. & Shank, C.V.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Wellbore Models GWELL, GWNACL, and HOLA User's Guide

Description: This report describes three multi-component, multi-feedzone geothermal wellbore simulators developed. These simulators reproduce the measured flowing temperature and pressure profiles in flowing wells and determine the relative contribution, fluid properties (e.g. enthalpy, temperature) and fluid composition (e.g. CO{sub 2}, NaCl) of each feedzone for a given discharge condition. The three related wellbore simulators that will be discussed here are HOLA, GWELL and GWNACL. HOLA is a multi-feedzone geothermal wellbore simulator for pure water, modified after the wellbore simulator developed by Bjornsson, 1987 and can now handle deviated wells. The other two simulators GWELL (see also Aunzo, 1990) and GWNACL are modified versions of HOLA that can handle H{sub 2}O-CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O-NaCl systems, respectively. These simulators can handle both single and two-phase flows in vertical and inclined pipes and calculate the flowing temperature and pressure profiles in the well. The simulators solve numerically the differential equations that describe the steady-state energy, mass and momentum flow in a pipe. The codes allow for multiple feedzones, variable grid spacing and well radius. These codes were developed using FORTRAN language on the UNIX system.
Date: October 1, 1991
Creator: Aunzo, Z.P.; Bjornsson, G. & Bodvarsson, G.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Earth Sciences Division annual report 1990

Description: This Annual Report presents summaries of selected representative research activities grouped according to the principal disciplines of the Earth Sciences Division: Reservoir Engineering and Hydrogeology, Geology and Geochemistry, and Geophysics and Geomechanics. Much of the Division`s research deals with the physical and chemical properties and processes in the earth`s crust, from the partially saturated, low-temperature near-surface environment to the high-temperature environments characteristic of regions where magmatic-hydrothermal processes are active. Strengths in laboratory and field instrumentation, numerical modeling, and in situ measurement allow study of the transport of mass and heat through geologic media -- studies that now include the appropriate chemical reactions and the hydraulic-mechanical complexities of fractured rock systems. Of particular note are three major Division efforts addressing problems in the discovery and recovery of petroleum, the application of isotope geochemistry to the study of geodynamic processes and earth history, and the development of borehole methods for high-resolution imaging of the subsurface using seismic and electromagnetic waves. In 1989 a major DOE-wide effort was launched in the areas of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management. Many of the methods previously developed for and applied to deeper regions of the earth will in the coming years be turned toward process definition and characterization of the very shallow subsurface, where man-induced contaminants now intrude and where remedial action is required.
Date: June 1, 1991
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department