564 Matching Results

Search Results

Advanced search parameters have been applied.

The 2006 Project Progress Report for 1987-099-00 Dworshak Kokanee Population and Entrainment Assessment (contract # 26850) is attached to project 2007-003-00, contract #31598. [POINTER]

Description: During this contract, we continued testing underwater strobe lights to determine their effectiveness at repelling kokanee Oncorhynchus nerka away from Dworshak Dam. Strobe light tests were conducted on four nights from April 24-27, 2006, in front of the middle reservoir outlet (RO) 2. The density and distribution of fish, (thought to be mostly kokanee), were monitored with a split-beam echo sounder. We then compared fish counts and densities during nights when the lights were flashing to counts and densities during adjacent nights without the lights on. On two nights, April 25 and 27, 2006, when no lights were present, fish counts near RO 2 averaged 12.4 fish and densities averaged 31.0 fish/ha. When strobe lights were turned on during the nights of April 24 and 26, mean counts dropped to 4.7 fish and densities dropped to 0.5 fish/ha. The decline in counts (62%) and densities (99%) was statistically significant (p = 0.009 and 0.002, respectively). Test results indicated that strobe lights were able to reduce fish densities by at least 50% in front of a discharging reservoir outlet, which would be sufficient to improve sport fish harvest. We also used split-beam hydroacoustics to monitor the kokanee population in Dworshak Reservoir during 2006. Estimated abundance of kokanee increased from the 2005 population estimate. Based on hydroacoustic surveys, we estimated approximately 5,815,000 kokanee (90% CI {+-} 27.6%) in Dworshak Reservoir in August 2006. This included 2,183,000 age-0 (90% CI {+-} 24.2%), 1,509,000 age-1 (90% CI {+-} 29.0%), and 2,124,000 age-2 (90% CI {+-} 27.6%) kokanee. This resulted in a density of age-2 kokanee above the management goal of 30-50 adults/ha. Entrainment sampling was conducted with fixed-site, split-beam hydroacoustics from May through September for a continuous 24 h period when dam operations permitted. The highest fish detection rates from entrainment assessments were found ...
Date: December 18, 2008
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Absorber height effects on SWA restrictions and 'Shadow' LER

Description: As extreme-ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) approaches introduction at the 22-nm half-pitch node, several key aspects of absorber height effects remain unexplored. In particular, sidewall angle (SWA) restrictions based on the height of the mask absorber has not yet been clearly defined. In addition, the effects of absorber height on line-edge roughness (LER) from shadowing has not been examined. We make an initial investigation into how tight SWA constraints are and the extent to which shadow LER alters basic LER. Our approach to SWA aims to find SWA restrictions based on 10% of the total CD error budget (10% of CD). Thus, we allot the SWA budget a {+-}0.2nm tolerance for 22nm half-pitch. New with EUVL is the off-axis illumination system. One potential pitfall that must be carefully monitored is the effect of mask absorber height blocking light from reaching, and therefore, correctly detecting, the base edge position of a feature. While mask features can correctly compensate sizing to target at the wafer, the effects of this shadowing on LER have not yet been investigated. Specifically, shadow LER may exacerbate or mitigate the inherent LER on the mask. Shadowing may also cause a difference in the observed LER on the right and left side of the features. We carefully probe this issue for a range of spatial frequencies. We do rigorous aerial image modeling of mask features with a nominal SWA of 80 degrees and correctly sized to target 22nm features measured at the top, 70nm TaN absorber on a 40 bilayer ML mirror with a 2.5nm Ru cap. Simulations were on a 4X system with an ideal pupil of NA = 0.32, illumination wavelength 13.4nm at 6{sup o} off-axis, and disk source shape with partial coherence factor of {sigma} = 0.50. We first implement a defocus offset to the aerial image ...
Date: February 21, 2011
Creator: McClinton, Brittany & Naulleau, Patrick
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Acceptance test procedure: RMW Land Disposal Facility Project W-025

Description: This ATP establishes field testing procedures to demonstrate that the electrical/instrumentation system functions as intended by design for the Radioactive Mixed Waste Land Disposal Facility. Procedures are outlined for the field testing of the following: electrical heat trace system; transducers and meter/controllers; pumps; leachate storage tank; and building power and lighting.
Date: December 12, 1994
Creator: Roscha, V.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Achieving Energy Savings with Highly-Controlled Lighting in an Open-Plan Office

Description: An installation in a Federal building tested the effectiveness of a highly-controlled, workstation-specific lighting retrofit. The study took place in an open-office area with 86 cubicles and low levels of daylight. Each cubicle was illuminated by a direct/indirectpendant luminaire with three 32 watt lamps, two dimmable DALI ballasts, and an occupancy sensor. A centralized control system programmed all three lamps to turn on and off according to occupancy on a workstation-by-workstation basis. Field measurements taken over the course of several monthsdemonstrated 40% lighting energy savings compared to a baseline without advanced controls that conforms to GSA's current retrofit standard. A photometric analysis found that the installation provided higher desktop light levels than the baseline, while an occupant survey found that occupants in general preferred the lighting system to thebaseline.Simple payback is fairly high; projects that can achieve lower installation costs and/or higher energy savings and those in which greenhouse gas reduction and occupant satisfaction are significant priorities provide the ideal setting for workstation-specific lighting retrofits.
Date: April 19, 2010
Creator: Rubinstein, Francis & Enscoe, Abby
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Achieving Very High Efficiency and Net Zero Energy in an Existing Home in a Hot-Humid Climate: Long-Term Utility and Monitoring Data (Revised)

Description: This study summarizes the first six months of detailed data collected on a single family home that experienced a series of retrofits targeting reductions in energy use. The project was designed to develop data on how envelope modifications and renewable measures can result in considerable energy reductions and potentially net zero energy for an existing home. Originally published in February 2012, this revised version of the report contains further research conducted on the Parker residence. Key updates include one full year of additional data, an analysis of cooling performance of the mini-split heat pump, an evaluation of room-to-room temperature distribution, and an evaluation of plug-in automobile charging performance, electricity consumption, and load shape.
Date: October 1, 2012
Creator: Parker, D. & Sherwin, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Acting Globally: Potential Carbon Emissions Mitigation Impacts from an International Standards and Labelling Program

Description: This paper presents an analysis of the potential impacts of an international initiative designed to support and promote the development and implementation of appliances standards and labelling programs throughout the world. As part of previous research efforts, LBNL developed the Bottom Up Energy Analysis System (BUENAS), an analysis framework that estimates impact potentials of energy efficiency policies on a global scale. In this paper, we apply this framework to an initiative that would result in the successful implementation of programs focused on high priority regions and product types, thus evaluating the potential impacts of such an initiative in terms of electricity savings and carbon mitigation in 2030. In order to model the likely parameters of such a program, we limit impacts to a five year period starting in 2009, but assume that the first 5 years of a program will result in implementation of 'best practice' minimum efficiency performance standards by 2014. The 'high priority' regions considered are: Brazil, China, the European Union,India, Mexico and the United States. The products considered are: refrigerators, air conditioners, lighting (both fluorescent and incandescent), standby power (for consumer electronics) and televisions in the residential sector, and air conditioning and lighting in commercial buildings. In 2020, these regions and enduses account for about 37percent of global residential electricity and 29percent of electricity in commercial buildings. We find that 850Mt of CO2 could be saved in buildings by 2030 compared to the baseline forecast.
Date: May 29, 2009
Creator: McNeil, Michael A; Letschert, Virginie E.; de la Rue du Can, Stephane & Egan, Christine
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Adapting Wireless Technology to Lighting Control and Environmental Sensing

Description: Although advanced lighting control systems offer significant energy savings, the high cost of retrofitting buildings with advanced lighting control systems is a barrier to adoption of this energy-saving technology. Wireless technology, however, offers a solution to mounting installation costs since it requires no additional wiring to implement. To demonstrate the feasibility of such a system, a prototype wirelessly-controlled advanced lighting system was designed and built. The system includes the following components: a wirelessly-controllable analog circuit module (ACM), a wirelessly-controllable electronic dimmable ballast, a T8 3-lamp fixture, an environmental multi-sensor, a current transducer, and control software. The ACM, dimmable ballast, multi-sensor, and current transducer were all integrated with SmartMesh{trademark} wireless mesh networking nodes, called motes, enabling wireless communication, sensor monitoring, and actuator control. Each mote-enabled device has a reliable communication path to the SmartMesh Manager, a single board computer that controls network functions and connects the wireless network to a PC running lighting control software. The ACM is capable of locally driving one or more standard 0-10 Volt electronic dimmable ballasts through relay control and a 0-10 Volt controllable output, in addition to 0-24 Volt and 0-10 Volt inputs. The mote-integrated electronic dimmable ballast is designed to drive a standard 3-lamp T8 light fixture. The environmental multisensor measures occupancy, light level and temperature. The current transducer is used to measure the power consumed by the fixture. Control software was developed to implement advanced lighting algorithms, including open and closed-loop daylight ramping, occupancy control, and demand response. Engineering prototypes of each component were fabricated and tested in a bench-scale system. Based on standard industry practices, a cost analysis was conducted. It is estimated that the installation cost of a wireless advanced lighting control system for a retrofit application is at least 20% lower than a comparable wired system for a typical 16,000 ...
Date: April 30, 2006
Creator: Teasdale, Dana; Rubinstein, Francis; Watson, David S. & Purdy, Steve
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Adapting Wireless Technology to Lighting Control and Environmental Sensing

Description: The high cost of retrofitting buildings with advanced lighting control systems is a barrier to adoption of this energy-saving technology. Wireless technology, however, offers a solution to mounting installation costs since it requires no additional wiring to implement. To demonstrate the feasibility of such a system, a prototype wirelessly-controlled advanced lighting system was designed and built. The system includes the following components: a wirelessly-controllable analog circuit module (ACM), a wirelessly-controllable electronic dimmable ballast, a T8 3-lamp fixture, an environmental multi-sensor, a current transducer, and control software. The ACM, dimmable ballast, multi-sensor, and current transducer were all integrated with SmartMesh{trademark} wireless mesh networking nodes, called motes, enabling wireless communication, sensor monitoring, and actuator control. Each mote-enabled device has a reliable communication path to the SmartMesh Manager, a single board computer that controls network functions and connects the wireless network to a PC running lighting control software. The ACM is capable of locally driving one or more standard 0-10 Volt electronic dimmable ballasts through relay control and a 0-10 Volt controllable output. The mote-integrated electronic dimmable ballast is designed to drive a standard 3-lamp T8 light fixture. The environmental multi-sensor measures occupancy, light level and temperature. The current transducer is used to measure the power consumed by the fixture. Control software was developed to implement advanced lighting algorithms, including daylight ramping, occupancy control, and demand response. Engineering prototypes of each component were fabricated and tested in a bench-scale system. Based on standard industry practices, a cost analysis was conducted. It is estimated that the installation cost of a wireless advanced lighting control system for a retrofit application is at least 30% lower than a comparable wired system for a typical 16,000 square-foot office building, with a payback period of less than 3 years.
Date: October 1, 2005
Creator: Teasdale, Dana; Rubinstein, Francis; Watson, Dave & Purdy, Steve
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

ADAPTIVE FULL-SPECTRUM SOLAR ENERGY SYSTEMS CROSS-CUTTING R&D ON ADAPTIVE FULL-SPECTRUM SOLAR ENERGY SYSTEMS FOR MORE EFFICIENT AND AFFORDABLE USE OF SOLAR ENERGY IN BUILDINGS AND HYBRID PHOTOBIOREACTORS

Description: This RD&D project is a three year team effort to develop a hybrid solar lighting (HSL) system that transports daylight from a paraboloidal dish concentrator to a luminaire via a bundle of small core or a large core polymer fiber optics. The luminaire can be a device to distribute sunlight into a space for the production of algae or it can be a device that is a combination of daylighting and electric lighting for space/task lighting. In this project, the sunlight is collected using a one-meter paraboloidal concentrator dish with two-axis tracking. For the second generation (alpha) system, the secondary mirror is an ellipsoidal mirror that directs the visible light into a bundle of small-core fibers. The IR spectrum is filtered out to minimize unnecessary heating at the fiber entrance region. This report describes the following investigations of various aspects of the system. Taken as a whole, they confirm significant progress towards the technical feasibility and commercial viability of this technology. (1) TRNSYS Modeling of a Hybrid Lighting System: Building Energy Loads and Chromaticity Analysis; (2) High Lumens Screening Test Setup for Optical Fibers; (3) Photo-Induced Heating in Plastic Optical Fiber Bundles; (4) Low-Cost Primary Mirror Development; (5) Potential Applications for Hybrid Solar Lighting; (6) Photobioreactor Population Experiments and Productivity Measurements; and (7) Development of a Microalgal CO2-Biofixation Photobioreactor.
Date: August 1, 2004
Creator: Wood, Byard D. & Muhs, Jeff D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Adopting a Long View to Energy R&D and Global Climate Change

Description: This report presents the results of an assessment of a test installation of two similar sulfur lamp, or S-lamp lighting systems, with hollow-light guide distribution. The S-lamp, developed by Fusion Lighting, Inc. with support from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Building Technology, Community and State Programs (BTS), was demonstrated as a prototype for the first time in 1994. The S-lamp embodies a new, microwave-powered, electrodeless technology that offers improved energy efficiency and color rendition compared with most available sources. The purpose of this assessment is to provide important information to all of those involved regarding the effectiveness and future applicability of this technology in a postal sorting setting.
Date: August 9, 1999
Creator: Doley, J.J. & Runci, P.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Advanced lighting guidelines: 1993. Final report

Description: The 1993 Advanced Lighting Guidelines document consists of twelve guidelines that provide an overview of specific lighting technologies and design application techniques utilizing energy-efficient lighting practice. Lighting Design Practice assesses energy-efficient lighting strategies, discusses lighting issues, and explains how to obtain quality lighting design and consulting services. Luminaires and Lighting Systems surveys luminaire equipment designed to take advantage of advanced technology lamp products and includes performance tables that allow for accurate estimation of luminaire light output and power input. The additional ten guidelines -- Computer-Aided Lighting Design, Energy-Efficient Fluorescent Ballasts, Full-Size Fluorescent Lamps, Compact Fluorescent Lamps, Tungsten-Halogen Lamps, Metal Halide and HPS Lamps, Daylighting and Lumen Maintenance, Occupant Sensors, Time Scheduling Systems, and Retrofit Control Technologies -- each provide a product technology overview, discuss current products on the lighting equipment market, and provide application techniques. This document is intended for use by electric utility personnel involved in lighting programs, lighting designers, electrical engineers, architects, lighting manufacturers` representatives, and other lighting professionals.
Date: December 31, 1993
Creator: Eley, C.; Tolen, T. M.; Benya, J. R.; Rubinstein, F. & Verderber, R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Advanced Lighting Program Development (BG9702800) Final Report

Description: The report presents a long-range plan for a broad-based, coordinated research, development and market transformation program for reducing the lighting energy intensities in commercial and residential buildings in California without compromising lighting quality. An effective program to advance lighting energy efficiency in California must be based on an understanding that lighting is a mature field and the lighting industry has developed many specialized products that meet a wide variety of light needs for different building types. Above all else, the lighting field is diverse and there are applications for a wide range of lighting products, systems, and strategies. Given the range of existing lighting solutions, an effective energy efficient lighting research portfolio must be broad-based and diverse to match the diversity of the lighting market itself. The belief that there is one solution--a magic bullet, such as a better lamp, for example--that will propel lighting efficiency across all uses to new heights is, in the authors' opinion, an illusion. A multi-path program is the only effective means to raising lighting efficiency across all lighting applications in all building types. This report presents a list of 27 lighting technologies and concepts (key activities) that could form the basis of a coordinated research and market transformation plan for significantly reducing lighting energy intensities in California buildings. The total 27 key activities into seven broad classes as follows: Light sources; Ballasts; Luminaires; Lighting Controls; Lighting Systems in Buildings; Human Factors and Education. Each of the above technology classes is discussed in terms of background, key activities, and the energy savings potential for the state. The report concludes that there are many possibilities for targeted research, development, and market transformation activities across all sectors of the building lighting industry. A concerted investment by the state to foster efficiency improvements in lighting systems in commercial ...
Date: February 1, 1998
Creator: Rubinstein, Francis & Johnson, Steve
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Advanced optical daylighting systems: light shelves and light pipes

Description: We present two perimeter daylighting systems that passively redirect beam sunlight further from the window wall using special optical films, an optimized geometry, and a small glazing aperture. The objectives of these systems are (1) to increase daylight illuminance levels at 4.6-9.1 m (15-30 ft) from the window aperture with minimum solar heat gains and (2) to improve the uniformity of the daylighting luminance gradient across the room under variable solar conditions throughout the year. The designs were developed through a series of computer-assisted ray-tracing studies, laser visualization techniques, and photometric measurements and observations using physical scale models. Bi-directional illuminance measurements in combination with analytical routines were then used to simulate daylight performance for any solar position, and were incorporated into the DOE-2.1E building energy analysis computer program to evaluate energy savings. Results show increased daylight levels and an improved luminance gradient throughout the year compared to conventional daylighting systems.
Date: May 1996
Creator: Beltran, L. O.; Lee, E. S. & Selkowitz, S. E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Advanced Sensors and Controls for Building Applications: Market Assessment and Potential R&D Pathways

Description: Significant energy savings can be achieved in commercial building operation, along with increased comfort and control for occupants, through the implementation of advanced technologies. This document provides a market assessment of existing building sensors and controls and presents a range of technology pathways (R&D options) for pursuing advanced sensors and building control strategies. This paper is actually a synthesis of five other white papers: the first describes the market assessment including estimates of market potential and energy savings for sensors and control strategies currently on the market as well as a discussion of market barriers to these technologies. The other four cover technology pathways: (1) current applications and strategies for new applications, (2) sensors and controls, (3) networking, security, and protocols and standards, and (4) automated diagnostics, performance monitoring, commissioning, optimal control and tools. Each technology pathway chapter gives an overview of the technology or application. This is followed by a discussion of needs and the current status of the technology. Finally, a series of research topics is proposed.
Date: April 13, 2005
Creator: Brambley, Michael R.; Haves, Philip; McDonald, Sean C.; Torcellini, Paul; Hansen, David G.; Holmberg, David et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Advancements in sensing and perception using structured lighting techniques :an LDRD final report.

Description: This report summarizes the analytical and experimental efforts for the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project entitled ''Advancements in Sensing and Perception using Structured Lighting Techniques''. There is an ever-increasing need for robust, autonomous ground vehicles for counterterrorism and defense missions. Although there has been nearly 30 years of government-sponsored research, it is undisputed that significant advancements in sensing and perception are necessary. We developed an innovative, advanced sensing technology for national security missions serving the Department of Energy, the Department of Defense, and other government agencies. The principal goal of this project was to develop an eye-safe, robust, low-cost, lightweight, 3D structured lighting sensor for use in broad daylight outdoor applications. The market for this technology is wide open due to the unavailability of such a sensor. Currently available laser scanners are slow, bulky and heavy, expensive, fragile, short-range, sensitive to vibration (highly problematic for moving platforms), and unreliable for outdoor use in bright sunlight conditions. Eye-safety issues are a primary concern for currently available laser-based sensors. Passive, stereo-imaging sensors are available for 3D sensing but suffer from several limitations : computationally intensive, require a lighted environment (natural or man-made light source), and don't work for many scenes or regions lacking texture or with ambiguous texture. Our approach leveraged from the advanced capabilities of modern CCD camera technology and Center 6600's expertise in 3D world modeling, mapping, and analysis, using structured lighting. We have a diverse customer base for indoor mapping applications and this research extends our current technology's lifecycle and opens a new market base for outdoor 3D mapping. Applications include precision mapping, autonomous navigation, dexterous manipulation, surveillance and reconnaissance, part inspection, geometric modeling, laser-based 3D volumetric imaging, simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM), aiding first responders, and supporting soldiers with helmet-mounted LADAR for 3D mapping in urban-environment ...
Date: September 1, 2005
Creator: Novick, David Keith; Padilla, Denise D.; Davidson, Patrick A., Jr. & Carlson, Jeffrey J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Advancing lighting and daylighting simulation: The transition from analysis to design aid tools

Description: This paper explores three significant software development requirements for making the transition from stand-alone lighting simulation/analysis tools to simulation-based design aid tools. These requirements include specialized lighting simulation engines, facilitated methods for creating detailed simulatable building descriptions, an automated techniques for providing lighting design guidance. Initial computer implementations meant to address each of these requirements are discussed to further elaborate these requirements and to illustrate work-in-progress.
Date: May 1, 1995
Creator: Hitchcock, R.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Alpha-Gamma Hot-Cell Facility at Argonne National Laboratory East

Description: The Alpha-Gamma Hot-Cell Facility has been in operation at Argonne National Laboratory East (ANL-E) for 15 years. The facility was designed for plutonium research in support of ANL's LMFBR program. The facility consists of a kilocurie, nitrogen-atmosphere alpha-gamma hot cell and supporting laboratories. Modifications to the facility and its equipment have been made over the years as the workload and nature of the work changed. These modifications included inerting the entire hot cell, adding four work stations, modifying in-loading procedures and examination equipment to handle longer test articles, and changing to a new sodium-vapor lighting system. Future upgrading includes the addition of a decontamination and repair facility, use of radio-controlled transfer carts, refurbishment of the zinc bromide windows, and the installation of an Auger microprobe.
Date: January 1, 1979
Creator: Neimark, L.A.; Jackson, W.D. & Donahue, D.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Alternative Air Conditioning Technologies: Underfloor AirDistribution (UFAD)

Description: Recent trends in today's office environment make it increasingly more difficult for conventional centralized HVAC systems to satisfy the environmental preferences of individual officer workers using the standardized approach of providing a single uniform thermal and ventilation environment. Since its original introduction in West Germany during the 1950s, the open plan office containing modular workstation furniture and partitions is now the norm. Thermostatically controlled zones in open plan offices typically encompass relatively large numbers of workstations in which a diverse work population having a wide range of preferred temperatures must be accommodated. Modern office buildings are also being impacted by a large influx of heat-generating equipment (computers, printers, etc.) whose loads may vary considerably from workstation to workstation. Offices are often reconfigured during the building's lifetime to respond to changing tenant needs, affecting the distribution of within-space loads and the ventilation pathways among and over office partitions. Compounding this problem, there has been a growing awareness of the importance of the comfort, health, and productivity of individual office workers, giving rise to an increased demand among employers and employees for a high-quality work environment. During recent years an increasing amount of attention has been paid to air distribution systems that individually condition the immediate environments of office workers within their workstations to address the issues outlined above. As with task/ambient lighting systems, the controls for the ''task'' components of these systems are partially or entirely decentralized and under the control of the occupants. Typically, the occupant has control over the speed and direction, and in some cases the temperature, of the incoming air supply. Variously called ''task/ambient conditioning,'' ''localized thermal distribution,'' and ''personalized air conditioning'' systems, these systems have been most commonly installed in open-plan office buildings in which they provide supply air and (in some cases) radiant heating directly ...
Date: June 1, 2004
Creator: Webster, Tom
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Ammothermal Growth of GaN Substrates For LEDs

Description: Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy project sheet summarizing general information about a new program to develop less expensive, more efficient LEDs (project title "High-Pressure Ammonothermal Process for Bulk Gallium Nitride Crystal Growth for Energy Efficient Commercially Competitive Lighting") including critical needs, innovation and advantages, impacts, and contact information. This sheet is the first open solicitation, announcing funding opportunities for involvement in the project.
Date: May 11, 2012
Creator: Soraa, Inc.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Analysis and technology transfer report, 1989 and 1990

Description: The buildings sector used 29.6 quadrillion Btus (quads) of energy in 1989, or 36 percent of the total primary energy consumed in the United States. The major uses are for space heating and cooling, water heating, refrigeration, and lighting. Electricity is the dominant fuel, followed by natural gas, petroleum, and other fuels. Although there were dramatic improvements in energy efficiency in this sector from 1975 to 1985, in recent years energy use has grown rapidly. The large growth expected in commercial building floor space and in residential units means that total building-sector energy consumption could increase dramatically by the year 2030. The mission of the US DOE's Office of Building Technologies (OBT) is to lead a national program supporting private sector efforts to improve the energy efficiency of the nation's buildings and to increase their utilization of renewable energy sources. The Office is also responsible for energy efficiency planning and management for Federal buildings as well as buildings-related associated information, financial incentives, and regulatory functions that are determined to be appropriate for the Federal government. To accomplish its goals, OBT plans and conducts research and development to make technologies available and provides information on their effectiveness. The selection and management of OBT research activities requires an understanding of where and how energy is used within the buildings sectors, how energy use is expected to change in the future, and the potential impact of new and emerging technologies on energy use. Analysis activities serve to collect energy use information, provide the analysis necessary to apply this information to research and development planning, and develop analysis tools which the program uses to set priorities for research projects. This report summarizes analysis and technology transfer activities undertaken by OBT during 1989 and 1990. 101 refs., 19 figs., 9 tabs.
Date: August 1, 1991
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Analysis of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Requirements for Residential Buildings in Kansas City, Missouri

Description: The 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) contains several major improvements in energy efficiency over the 2006 IECC. The notable changes are: (1) Improved duct sealing verified by testing the duct system; (2) Increased duct insulation; (3) Improvement of window U-factors from 0.40 to 0.35; and (4) Efficient lighting requirements. An analysis of these changes resulted in estimated annual energy cost savings of about $145 a year for an average new house. Construction cost increases are estimated at $655. Home owners will experience an annual cost savings of close to $100 a year because reduction to energy bills will more than compensate for increased mortgage payments and other costs.
Date: September 30, 2011
Creator: Lucas, Robert G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department