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Accelerated alpha radiation damage in a ceramic waste form, interim results

Description: Interim results are presented on the alpha-decay damage study of a {sup 238}Pu-loaded ceramic waste form (CWF). The waste form was developed to immobilize fission products and transuranic species accumulated from the electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuel. To evaluate the effects of {alpha}-decay damage on the waste form the {sup 238}Pu-loaded material was analyzed by (1) x-ray diffraction (XRD), (2) microstructure characterization by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with energy and wavelength dispersive spectroscopy (EDS/WDS) and electron diffraction, (3) bulk density measurements and (4) waste form durability, performed by the product consistency test (PCT). While the predominate phase of plutonium in the CWF, PuO{sub 2}, shows the expected unit cell expansion due to {alpha}-decay damage, currently no significant change has occurred to the macro- or microstructure of the material. The major phase of the waste form is sodalite and contains very little Pu, although the exact amount is unknown. Interestingly, measurement of the sodalite phase unit cell is also showing very slight expansion; again, presumably from {alpha}-decay damage.
Date: November 11, 1999
Creator: Frank, S. M.; Johnson, S. G.; Moschetti, T. L.; O'Holleran, T. P.; Sinkler, W.; Esh, D. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Advances in beryllium powder consolidation simulation

Description: A fuzzy logic based multiobjective genetic algorithm (GA) is introduced and the algorithm is used to optimize micromechanical densification modeling parameters for warm isopressed beryllium powder, HIPed copper powder and CIPed/sintered and HIPed tantalum powder. In addition to optimizing the main model parameters using the experimental data points as objective functions, the GA provides a quantitative measure of the sensitivity of the model to each parameter, estimates the mean particle size of the powder, and determines the smoothing factors for the transition between stage 1 and stage 2 densification. While the GA does not provide a sensitivity analysis in the strictest sense, and is highly stochastic in nature, this method is reliable and reproducible in optimizing parameters given any size data set and determining the impact on the model of slight variations in each parameter.
Date: December 1, 1998
Creator: Reardon, B. J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Alternative Electrochemical Salt Waste Forms, Summary of FY2010 Results

Description: In FY2009, PNNL performed scoping studies to qualify two waste form candidates, tellurite (TeO2-based) glasses and halide minerals, for the electrochemical waste stream for further investigation. Both candidates showed promise with acceptable PCT release rates and effective incorporation of the 10% fission product waste stream. Both candidates received reprisal for FY2010 and were further investigated. At the beginning of FY2010, an in-depth literature review kicked off the tellurite glasses study. The review was aimed at ascertaining the state-of-the-art for chemical durability testing and mixed chloride incorporation for tellurite glasses. The literature review led the authors to 4 unique binary and 1 unique ternary systems for further investigation which include TeO2 plus the following: PbO, Al2O3-B2O3, WO3, P2O5, and ZnO. Each system was studied with and without a mixed chloride simulated electrochemical waste stream and the literature review provided the starting points for the baseline compositions as well as starting points for melting temperature, compatible crucible types, etc. The most promising glasses in each system were scaled up in production and were analyzed with the Product Consistency Test, a chemical durability test. Baseline and PCT glasses were analyzed to determine their state, i.e., amorphous, crystalline, phase separated, had undissolved material within the bulk, etc. Conclusions were made as well as the proposed direction for FY2011 plans. Sodalite was successfully synthesized by the sol-gel method. The vast majority of the dried sol-gel consisted of sodalite with small amounts of alumino-silicates and unreacted salt. Upon firing the powders made by sol-gel, the primary phase observed was sodalite with the addition of varying amounts of nepheline, carnegieite, lithium silicate, and lanthanide oxide. The amount of sodalite, nepheline, and carnegieite as well as the bulk density of the fired pellets varied with firing temperature, sol-gel process chemistry, and the amount of glass sintering aid added ...
Date: August 1, 2010
Creator: Riley, Brian J.; Rieck, Bennett T.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Matyas, Josef; McCloy, John S.; Sundaram, S. K. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Alternative waste forms for immobilization of transuranic wastes

Description: Several alternative waste forms are being considered for the immobilization of consolidated trnsuranic (TRU) wastes. General characteristics and applicability of these waste forms to TRU wastes are reviewed. Specific attention is given to recent experimental results on sintered ceramic TRU waste forms including bulk properties, impact resistance, leachability, and volatility.
Date: September 1, 1979
Creator: Rusin, J. M. & Palmer, C. R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

ANALYSIS OF THE TANK 5F FINAL CHARACTERIZATION SAMPLES-2011

Description: The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested by SRR to provide sample preparation and analysis of the Tank 5F final characterization samples to determine the residual tank inventory prior to grouting. Two types of samples were collected and delivered to SRNL: floor samples across the tank and subsurface samples from mounds near risers 1 and 5 of Tank 5F. These samples were taken from Tank 5F between January and March 2011. These samples from individual locations in the tank (nine floor samples and six mound Tank 5F samples) were each homogenized and combined in a given proportion into 3 distinct composite samples to mimic the average composition in the entire tank. These Tank 5F composite samples were analyzed for radiological, chemical and elemental components. Additional measurements performed on the Tank 5F composite samples include bulk density and water leaching of the solids to account for water soluble species. With analyses for certain challenging radionuclides as the exception, all composite Tank 5F samples were analyzed and reported in triplicate. The target detection limits for isotopes analyzed were based on customer desired detection limits as specified in the technical task request documents. SRNL developed new methodologies to meet these target detection limits and provide data for the extensive suite of components. While many of the target detection limits were met for the species characterized for Tank 5F, as specified in the technical task request, some were not met. In a few cases, the relatively high levels of radioactive species of the same element or a chemically similar element precluded the ability to measure some isotopes to low levels. The Technical Task Request allows that while the analyses of these isotopes is needed, meeting the detection limits for these isotopes is a lower priority than meeting detection limits for the other specified ...
Date: August 3, 2012
Creator: Oji, L.; Diprete, D.; Coleman, C. & Hay, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

ANALYSIS OF THE TANK 5F FINAL CHARATERIZATION SAMPLES-2011

Description: The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested by SRR to provide sample preparation and analysis of the Tank 5F final characterization samples to determine the residual tank inventory prior to grouting. Two types of samples were collected and delivered to SRNL: floor samples across the tank and subsurface samples from mounds near risers 1 and 5 of Tank 5F. These samples were taken from Tank 5F between January and March 2011. These samples from individual locations in the tank (nine floor samples and six mound Tank 5F samples) were each homogenized and combined in a given proportion into 3 distinct composite samples to mimic the average composition in the entire tank. These Tank 5F composite samples were analyzed for radiological, chemical and elemental components. Additional measurements performed on the Tank 5F composite samples include bulk density and water leaching of the solids to account for water soluble species. With analyses for certain challenging radionuclides as the exception, all composite Tank 5F samples were analyzed and reported in triplicate. The target detection limits for isotopes analyzed were based on customer desired detection limits as specified in the technical task request documents. SRNL developed new methodologies to meet these target detection limits and provide data for the extensive suite of components. While many of the target detection limits were met for the species characterized for Tank 5F, as specified in the technical task request, some were not met. In a few cases, the relatively high levels of radioactive species of the same element or a chemically similar element precluded the ability to measure some isotopes to low levels. The Technical Task Request allows that while the analyses of these isotopes is needed, meeting the detection limits for these isotopes is a lower priority than meeting detection limits for the other specified ...
Date: January 20, 2012
Creator: Oji, L.; Diprete, D.; Coleman, C. & Hay, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

ANALYSIS OF THE TANK 6F FINAL CHARACTERIZATION SAMPLES-2012

Description: The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested by Savannah River Remediation (SRR) to provide sample preparation and analysis of the Tank 6F final characterization samples to determine the residual tank inventory prior to grouting. Fourteen residual Tank 6F solid samples from three areas on the floor of the tank were collected and delivered to SRNL between May and August 2011. These Tank 6F samples were homogenized and combined into three composite samples based on a proportion compositing scheme and the resulting composite samples were analyzed for radiological, chemical and elemental components. Additional measurements performed on the Tank 6F composite samples include bulk density and water leaching of the solids to account for water soluble components. The composite Tank 6F samples were analyzed and the data reported in triplicate. Sufficient quality assurance standards and blanks were utilized to demonstrate adequate characterization of the Tank 6F samples. The main evaluation criteria were target detection limits specified in the technical task request document. While many of the target detection limits were met for the species characterized for Tank 6F some were not met. In a few cases, the relatively high levels of radioactive species of the same element or a chemically similar element precluded the ability to measure some isotopes to low levels. The isotopes whose detection limits were not met in all cases included Sn-126, Sb-126, Sb-126m, Eu-152, Cm-243 and Cf-249. SRNL, in conjunction with the customer, reviewed all of these cases and determined that the impacts of not meeting the target detection limits were acceptable. Based on the analyses of variance (ANOVA) for the inorganic constituents of Tank 6F, all the inorganic constituents displayed heterogeneity. The inorganic results demonstrated consistent differences across the composite samples: lowest concentrations for Composite Sample 1, intermediate-valued concentrations for Composite Sample 2, and highest concentrations ...
Date: June 28, 2012
Creator: Oji, L.; Diprete, D.; Coleman, C.; Hay, M. & Shine, G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Application of cathodic arc deposited amorphous hard carbon films to the head/disk tribology

Description: Amorphous hard carbon films deposited by filtered cathodic arc deposition exhibit very high hardness and elastic modulus, high mass density, low coefficient of friction, and the films are very smooth. All these properties are beneficial to applications of these films for the head/disk interface tribology. The properties of cathodic arc deposited amorphous carbon films are summarized, and they are compared to sputter deposited, hydrogenated (CH{sub x}), and nitrogenated (CN{sub x}) carbon films which are the present choice for hard disk and slider coatings. New developments in cathodic arc coaters are discussed which are of interest to the disk drive industry. Experiments on the nanotribology, mass density and hardness, corrosion behavior, and tribochemical behavior of cathodic arc films are reported. A number of applications of cathodic arc deposited films to hard disk and slider coatings are described. It is shown that their tribological performance is considerably better compared to CH{sub x} and CN{sub x} films.
Date: April 1998
Creator: Anders, S.; Bhatia, C. S.; Fong, W.; Lo, R. Y. & Bogy, D. B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Application of geophysical logs to estimate moisture-content profiles in unsaturated tuff, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

Description: Determination of the moisture content in boreholes, drilled for the purpose of conducting hydrological studies in the unsaturated zone, is critical in the evaluation of the natural state of the unsaturated zone. Geophysical logs combined with geologic and hydrologic examination of the borehole cuttings provide a means to estimate moisture-content profiles. Interpretations of geophysical well logs for unsaturated, welded, and fractured tuff have not been attempted previously. This paper compares the results of analyses of various geophysical logs that were obtained from two large diameter, air-drilled (vacuum reverse circulation) boreholes at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, that were drilled as part of the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project of the US Department of Energy. Caliper, gamma-ray, temperature, induction, density, epithermal-neutron, and dielectric logs were run in these boreholes. Moisture-content data from the drill cuttings were compared with moisture-content data derived from logs. Saturation profiles were obtained from different logs and were correlated with each other. Qualitative correlation of the degree of welding with bulk density also was conducted; overall correlations were satisfactory. Borehole geophysical logs proved reliable in determining moisture-content profiles. 6 refs., 9 figs.
Date: December 31, 1985
Creator: Palaz, I.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A Benchmarking Analysis for Five Radionuclide Vadose Zone Models (Chain, Multimed{_}DP, Fectuz, Hydrus, and Chain 2D) in Soil Screening Level Calculations

Description: Five vadose zone models with different degrees of complexity (CHAIN, MULTIMED{_}DP, FECTUZ, HYDRUS, and CHAIN 2D) were selected for use in radionuclide soil screening level (SSL) calculations. A benchmarking analysis between the models was conducted for a radionuclide ({sup 99}Tc) release scenario at the Las Cruces Trench Site in New Mexico. Sensitivity of three model outputs to the input parameters were evaluated and compared among the models. The three outputs were peak contaminant concentrations, time to peak concentrations at the water table, and time to exceed the contaminants maximum critical level at a representative receptor well. Model parameters investigated include soil properties such as bulk density, water content, soil water retention parameters and hydraulic conductivity. Chemical properties examined include distribution coefficient, radionuclide half-life, dispersion coefficient, and molecular diffusion. Other soil characteristics, such as recharge rate, also were examined. Model sensitivity was quantified in the form of sensitivity and relative sensitivity coefficients. Relative sensitivities were used to compare the sensitivities of different parameters. The analysis indicates that soil water content, recharge rate, saturated soil water content, and soil retention parameter, {beta}, have a great influence on model outputs. In general, the results of sensitivities and relative sensitivities using five models are similar for a specific scenario. Slight differences were observed in predicted peak contaminant concentrations due to different mathematical treatment among models. The results of benchmarking and sensitivity analysis would facilitate the model selection and application of the model in SSL calculations.
Date: February 26, 2002
Creator: Chen, J-S.; Drake, R.; Lin, Z. & Jewett, D. G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Birch's law and the properties of high temperature fluid metals

Description: By comparing acoustic velocities in fluid metals over a very wide range of densities we have established Birch's Law as an approximate representation over the entire liquid range. For a given liquid metal the acoustic velocity is close to linear in density, with a slope determined by the atomic weight. The measurements include isobaric expansion to less than half normal density, ultrasonics on molten metals at 1 atmosphere, and shock-melted metals to greater than twice normal density. We also find unusual behavior of the Gruneisen gamma, which can be explained in terms of simple fluid models. 15 refs.
Date: January 1, 1987
Creator: Shaner, J.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Bonding of DATB progress report

Description: A series of DATB (diaximotrinitrobenzine) pressings were made in an effort to find the most suitable binder. The requirements for this binder were as follows: Thermal stability (Must be as stable as DATB or not show any reaction with DATB at 200 degrees C); Density (Must press to 95% theoretical or higher); Compressive Strength (Must be strong enough to machine, and stronger if possible); Moldability (Must be adaptable to isostatic pressing conditions). After investigating various materials such as epoxies, a high temperature silicon phenolic and Exon, it was found that, DATB could not be pressed at 110 degrees C and 20,000 psi to an acceptable density and strength. While a plastic binder is not needed for reasons of strength or desensitization, it may however be needed as a plasticizer to resist thermal shock. This can only be determined by the production of larger specimens at Site 300. Summarized data is presented.
Date: August 2, 1958
Creator: Archibald, P. B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Bonding topologies in diamondlike amorphous-carbon films

Description: The carbon ion energy used during filtered cathodic vacuum arc deposition determines the bonding topologies of amorphous-carbon (a-C) films. Regions of relatively low density occur near the substrate/film and film/surface interfaces and their thicknesses increase with increasing deposition energy. The ion subplantation growth results in mass density gradients in the bulk portion of a-C in the growth direction; density decreases with distance from the substrate for films grown using ion energies < 60 eV and increases for films grown using ion energies > 160 eV. Films grown between these energies are the most diamondlike with relatively uniform bulk density and the highest optical transparencies. Bonding topologies evolve with increasing growth energy consistent with the propagation of subplanted carbon ions inducing a partial transformation of 4-fold to 3-fold coordinated carbon atoms.
Date: January 27, 2000
Creator: SIEGAL,MICHAEL P.; PROVENCIO,PAULA P.; TALLANT,DAVID R.; SIMPSON,REGINA L.; KLEINSORGE,B. & MILNE,W.I.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Bulk, thermal, and mechanical properties of the Topopah Spring Member of the Paintbrush Tuff, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

Description: Experimental data on matrix porosity, grain density, thermal expansion, compressive strength, Young`s modulus, Poisson`s ratio, and axial strain at failure for samples from the Topopah Spring Member of the Paintbrush Tuff are compiled. Heat capacity and emissivity also are discussed. Data have been analyzed for spatial variability; slight variability is observed for matrix porosity, grain density, and thermal expansion coefficient. Estimates of in situ values for some properties, such as bulk density and heat capacity, are presented. Vertical in situ stress as a function of horizontal and vertical location has been calculated. 96 refs., 37 figs., 27 tabs.
Date: September 1, 1987
Creator: Nimick, F.B. & Schwartz, B.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Buried waste containment system materials. Final Report

Description: This report describes the results of a test program to validate the application of a latex-modified cement formulation for use with the Buried Waste Containment System (BWCS) process during a proof of principle (POP) demonstration. The test program included three objectives. One objective was to validate the barrier material mix formulation to be used with the BWCS equipment. A basic mix formula for initial trials was supplied by the cement and latex vendors. The suitability of the material for BWCS application was verified by laboratory testing at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). A second objective was to determine if the POP BWCS material emplacement process adversely affected the barrier material properties. This objective was met by measuring and comparing properties of material prepared in the INEEL Materials Testing Laboratory (MTL) with identical properties of material produced by the BWCS field tests. These measurements included hydraulic conductivity to determine if the material met the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requirements for barriers used for hazardous waste sites, petrographic analysis to allow an assessment of barrier material separation and segregation during emplacement, and a set of mechanical property tests typical of concrete characterization. The third objective was to measure the hydraulic properties of barrier material containing a stop-start joint to determine if such a feature would meet the EPA requirements for hazardous waste site barriers.
Date: October 1, 1997
Creator: Weidner, J.R. & Shaw, P.G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Carbon Characterization Laboratory Report

Description: The newly completed Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Carbon Characterization Laboratory (CCL) is located in Lab-C20 of the Idaho National Laboratory Research Center. This laboratory was established under the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project to support graphite research and development activities. The CCL is designed to characterize and test carbon-based materials such as graphite, carbon-carbon composites, and silicon-carbide composite materials. The laboratory is fully prepared to measure material properties for nonirradiated carbon-based materials. Plans to establish the laboratory as a radiological facility within the next year are definitive. This laboratory will be modified to accommodate irradiated materials, after which it can be used to perform material property measurements on both irradiated and nonirradiated carbon-based material. Instruments, fixtures, and methods are in place for preirradiation measurements of bulk density, thermal diffusivity, coefficient of thermal expansion, elastic modulus, Young’s modulus, Shear modulus, Poisson ratio, and electrical resistivity. The measurement protocol consists of functional validation, calibration, and automated data acquisition.
Date: March 1, 2009
Creator: Swank, David; Windes, William; Haggard, D.C.; Rohrbaugh, David & Moore, Karen
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Carbon Dioxide Capture from Flue Gas Using Dry, Regenerable Sorbents

Description: This report describes research conducted between January 1, 2006, and March 31, 2006, on the use of dry regenerable sorbents for removal of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from coal combustion flue gas. An integrated system composed of a downflow co-current contact absorber and two hollow screw conveyors (regenerator and cooler) was assembled, instrumented, debugged, and calibrated. A new batch of supported sorbent containing 15% sodium carbonate was prepared and subjected to surface area and compact bulk density determination.
Date: March 31, 2006
Creator: Green, David A.; Nelson, Thomas O.; Turk, Brian S.; Box, Paul D. & Gupta, Raghubir P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Carbon Sequestration in Reclaimed Mined Soils of Ohio

Description: This research project is aimed at assessing the soil organic carbon (SOC) sequestration potential of reclaimed minesoils (RMS). The experimental sites were characterized by distinct age chronosequences of reclaimed minesoil and were located in Guernsey, Morgan, Noble, and Muskingum Counties of Ohio. These sites are owned and maintained by Americal Electrical Power. These sites were reclaimed (1) with topsoil application, and (2) without topsoil application, and were under continuous grass or forest cover. Three core and three bulk soil samples were collected from each of the experimental site and one unmined site (UMS) for 0-15 cm and 15-30 cm depths and soil bulk density ({rho}{sub b}), texture, saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks), volumes of transport (VTP) and storage (VSP) pores, available water capacity (AWC), pH and electrical conductivity (EC), SOC, total nitrogen (TN) concentrations and stocks were determined. The preliminary results from sites reclaimed with topsoil and grass indicate that sand content was highest (24%) and clay content was lowest (17%) for site reclaimed in 2003 (R03) for 0-15 cm depth. The {rho}{sub b} was highest for R03 (1.24 Mg m{sup -3}) than sites reclaimed in 1987 (R87; 1.02 Mg m{sup -3}), 1978 (R78; 0.98 Mg m{sup -3}) and UMS (0.96 Mg m{sup -3}) for 0-15 cm depth. No significant differences were observed in Ks, VTP, VSP, AWC among these sites (P<0.05). For 15-30 cm depth {rho}{sub b} varied in the order R03 (1.61 Mg m{sup -3})> R87 (1.42 Mg m{sup -3}) = R78 (1.40 Mg m{sup -3}) = UMS (1.34 Mg m{sup -3}). Soil pH was > 5.5 and EC < 4 dS m{sup -1} for all sites and depths and was favorable for grass growth. The SOC and TN stocks were lower in R03 (3.5 Mg ha{sup -1} and 0.6 Mg ha{sup -1}; respectively) than R78 (30.1 Mg ha{sup ...
Date: April 1, 2004
Creator: Shukla, M.K. & Lal, R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Carbon Sequestration in Reclaimed Mined Soils of Ohio

Description: Assessment of soil organic carbon (SOC) sequestration potential of reclaimed minesoils (RMS) is important for preserving environmental quality and increasing agronomic yields. The experimental sites were characterized by distinct age chronosequences of reclaimed minesoil and were located in Guernsey, Morgan, Noble, and Muskingum Counties of Ohio. These sites are owned and maintained by Americal Electrical Power. These sites were reclaimed (1) with topsoil application, and (2) without topsoil application, and were under continuous grass or forest cover. In this report results are presented from the sites reclaimed without topsoil application between 1956 and 1969. Three sites are under continuous grass cover and the three under forest cover since reclamation. Three core and three bulk soil samples were collected from each site from three slope positions (upper; middle, and lower) for 0-15 cm and 15-30 cm depths, and texture, pH and electrical conductivity (EC), soil bulk density ({rho}{sub b}), SOC, total nitrogen (TN) stocks were determined. No differences in sand and clay contents, bulk density, SOC and TN stocks were observed within different slope positions within each site. However, sand [R56-G (17.1%) < R69-G (29.1%) = R62-G (29.1%)], and silt [R56-G (58.3%) > R69-G (47.7%)] contents, bulk density [R62-G (1.25 Mg ha{sup -1}) > R69-G (0.94 Mg ha{sup -1}) = R62-G (0.90 Mg ha{sup -1})] varied significantly on the upper slope position among sites under continuous grass cover. Smaller but significant differences were also observed for pH [R69-G (8.3) > R56-G (7.7) = R62-G (7.9)] and EC [R56-G (0.66 dS m{sup -1}) > R62-G (0.25 dS m{sup -1}) = R69-G (0.24 dS m{sup -1})] on upper slope positions among sites under grass. Comparing all sites stochastically, sand and clay contents were similar among all sites except R62-F for both depths. Similarly, soil bulk density was also similar among all sites except ...
Date: January 1, 2005
Creator: Shukla, M.K. & Lal, R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

CARBON SEQUESTRATION IN RECLAIMED MINED SOILS OF OHIO

Description: This research project is aimed at assessing the soil organic carbon (SOC) sequestration potential of reclaimed minesoils (RMS). The experimental sites, owned and maintained by the American Electrical Power, are located in Guernsey, Morgan, Noble, and Muskingum Counties of Ohio. These sites, characterized by age chronosequences, were reclaimed with and without topsoil application and are under continuous grass or forest cover. During this quarter, bulk and core soil samples were collected from all 13 experimental sites for 0-15 cm, 15-30 cm, and 30-50 cm depths. In addition, 54 experimental plots (4 x 4 m) were established at three separate locations on reclaimed minesites to assess the influence of compost application on SOC during project period 2. This report presents the results from two sites reclaimed during 1978. The first site is under grass and the other under forest cover. The soil bulk density ({rho}{sub b}), SOC, total nitrogen (TN) concentrations and stocks were determined for these two sites on a 20 x 20 m grid. The preliminary analysis showed that the {rho}{sub b} ranged from 0.88 Mg m{sup -3} to 1.16 Mg m{sup -3} for 0-15 cm, 0.91 Mg m{sup -3} to 1.32 Mg m{sup -3} for 15-30 cm, and 1.37 Mg m{sup -3} to 1.93 Mg m{sup -3} for 30-50 cm depths in Cumberland tree site, and it's statistical variability was low. The variability in {rho}{sub b} was also low in Wilds grass site and ranged from 0.82 Mg m{sup -3} to 1.18 Mg m{sup -3} for 0-15 cm, 1.04 Mg m{sup -3} to 1.37 Mg m{sup -3} for 15-30 cm, and 1.18 Mg m{sup -3} to 1.83 Mg m{sup -3} for 30-50 cm depths. The {rho}{sub b} showed strong spatial dependence for 0-15 cm depth only in the Cumberland tree site. The SOC concentrations and stocks were highly ...
Date: July 1, 2004
Creator: Shukla, M.K. & Lal, R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

CARBON SEQUESTRATION IN RECLAIMED MINED SOILS OF OHIO

Description: This research project is aimed at assessing the soil organic carbon (SOC) sequestration potential of reclaimed minesoils (RMS). The experimental sites, owned and maintained by the American Electrical Power, are located in Guernsey, Morgan, Noble, and Muskingum Counties of Ohio. These sites, characterized by age chronosequences, were reclaimed with and without topsoil application and are under continuous grass or forest cover. During this quarter, water infiltration tests were performed on the soil surface in the experimental sites. Soil samples were analyzed for the soil carbon and nitrogen contents, texture, water stable aggregation, and mean weight and geometric mean diameter of aggregates. This report presents the results from two sites reclaimed during 1978 and managed under grass (Wilds) and forest (Cumberland) cover, respectively. The trees were planted in 1982 in the Cumberland site. The analyses of data on soil bulk density ({rho}{sub b}), SOC and total nitrogen (TN) concentrations and stocks were presented in the third quarter report. This report presents the data on infiltration rates, volume of transport and storage pores, available water capacity (AWC) of soil, particle size distribution, and soil inorganic carbon (SIC) and coal carbon contents. The SIC content ranged from 0.04 to 1.68% in Cumberland tree site and 0.01 to 0.65% in the Wilds. The coal content assumed to be the carbon content after oven drying the sample at 350 C varied between 0.04 and 3.18% for Cumberland and 0.06 and 3.49% for Wilds. The sand, silt and clay contents showed moderate to low variability (CV < 0.16) for 0-15 and 15-30 cm depths. The volume of transmission (VTP) and storage pores (VSP) also showed moderate to high variability (CV ranged from 0.22 to 0.39 for Wilds and 0.17 to 0.36 for Cumberland). The CV for SIC was high (0.7) in Cumberland whereas that for coal ...
Date: October 1, 2004
Creator: Shukla, M.K. & Lal, R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Carbon Sequestration on Surface Mine Lands

Description: A major effort this quarter was to inventory all the planted areas to evaluate the diameter and height growth as well as determine survival rates. Soil bulk density and compaction continue to be evaluated on all the areas to determine the effects on tree growth and survival. The hydrologic quantity and quality are continuously monitored and quantified. Much effort was also expended in preparing technical presentations for professional meeting and for the preparation of the final project report.
Date: May 2, 2006
Creator: Graves, Donald H.; Barton, Christopher; Sweigard, Richard & Warner, Richard
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Carbon Sequestration on Surface Mine Lands

Description: A major effort this quarter was to inventory all the planted areas to evaluate the diameter and height growth as well as determine survival rates. Soil bulk density and compaction continue to be evaluated on all the areas to determine the effects on tree growth and survival. The hydrologic quantity and quality are continuously monitored and quantified. Much effort was also expended in preparing technical presentations for professional meeting and field trips for a variety of audiences.
Date: December 7, 2005
Creator: Graves, Donald H.; Barton, Christopher; Sweigard, Richard & Warner, Richard
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department