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Joint Chiefs of Staff: Notes

Description: The purpose of the paper is to state the rationale upon which the Joint Chiefs of Staff (JCS) bases its opposition to further extension of the Limited Test Ban Treaty (LTBT). The argumentation of the paper is hinged primarily on the contention that the USSR is ahead of the US in nuclear weapon technology. Accordingly, there is much for the US to do, so that the Soviets do not, primarily through the deployment of an Anti-Ballistic Missile [ABM] system, alter the strategic balanc the US should not agree to further restrictions on testing which would prevent the US from correcting the deficiencies of its strategic deterrent systems and making developments necessary for a Nike-Zeus warhead.
Date: August 29, 1966
Creator: Heckrotte, W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Limits on linearity of missile allocation optimization

Description: Optimizations of missile allocation based on linearized exchange equations produce accurate allocations, but the limits of validity of the linearization are not known. These limits are explored in the context of the upload of weapons by one side to initially small, equal forces of vulnerable and survivable weapons. The analysis compares analytic and numerical optimizations and stability induces based on aggregated interactions of the two missile forces, the first and second strikes they could deliver, and they resulting costs. This note discusses the costs and stability indices induced by unilateral uploading of weapons to an initially symmetrical low force configuration. These limits are quantified for forces with a few hundred missiles by comparing analytic and numerical optimizations of first strike costs. For forces of 100 vulnerable and 100 survivable missiles on each side, the analytic optimization agrees closely with the numerical solution. For 200 vulnerable and 200 survivable missiles on each side, the analytic optimization agrees with the induces to within about 10%, but disagrees with the allocation of the side with more weapons by about 50%. The disagreement comes from the interaction of the possession of more weapons with the shift of allocation from missiles to value that they induce.
Date: December 1, 1997
Creator: Canavan, G. H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Military airborne and maritime application for cooperative behaviors.

Description: As part of DARPA's Software for Distributed Robotics Program within the Information Processing Technologies Office (IPTO), Sandia National Laboratories was tasked with identifying military airborne and maritime missions that require cooperative behaviors as well as identifying generic collective behaviors and performance metrics for these missions. This report documents this study. A prioritized list of general military missions applicable to land, air, and sea has been identified. From the top eight missions, nine generic reusable cooperative behaviors have been defined. A common mathematical framework for cooperative controls has been developed and applied to several of the behaviors. The framework is based on optimization principles and has provably convergent properties. A three-step optimization process is used to develop the decentralized control law that minimizes the behavior's performance index. A connective stability analysis is then performed to determine constraints on the communication sample period and the local control gains. Finally, the communication sample period for four different network protocols is evaluated based on the network graph, which changes throughout the task. Using this mathematical framework, two metrics for evaluating these behaviors are defined. The first metric is the residual error in the global performance index that is used to create the behavior. The second metric is communication sample period between robots, which affects the overall time required for the behavior to reach its goal state.
Date: September 1, 2004
Creator: Feddema, John Todd; Byrne, Raymond Harry & Robinett, Rush D. III
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

National Security Strategy: Legislative Mandates, Execution to Date, and Considerations for Congress

Description: This report reviews current legislative mandates for security strategic documents, assesses the recent history of execution, describes strategic documents in related fields for comparison, presents considerations that may be useful in assessing current requirements and execution, and notes several current proposals for changes to legislative requirements.
Date: September 23, 2008
Creator: Dale, Catherine
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

National Security Strategy: Legislative Mandates, Execution to Date, and Considerations for Congress

Description: This report reviews current legislative mandates for security strategic documents, assesses the recent history of execution, describes strategic documents in related fields for comparison, presents considerations that may be useful in assessing current requirements and execution, and notes several current proposals for changes to legislative requirements.
Date: May 28, 2008
Creator: Dale, Catherine
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

National Security Strategy: Legislative Mandates, Execution to Date, and Considerations for Congress

Description: This report reviews the current legislative mandates for key security strategic documents, assesses the recent history of execution, describes strategic documents in related fields for comparison, presents a series of considerations that may be useful in assessing current requirements and execution, and notes several major proposals for change.
Date: July 28, 2008
Creator: Dale, Catherine
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Navy Mobility Fuels Forecasting System Phase 6 report: Impacts of a military disruption on Navy fuel availability and quality

Description: The Refinery Yield Model of the Navy Mobility Fuels Forecasting System has been used to study the impacts of a severe military disruption on the production of Navy JP-5 jet fuel and F-76 marine diesel fuel in the year 1995. The global petroleum supply reduction due to the disruption was about 40 percent of the business-as-usual supply. Regional production cost increases for JP-5 were between $3 and $11 per gallon during the disruption. For F-76, the production cost increases were between $3 and $5 per gallon. The disruption caused substantial degradations for certain fuel quality properties of F-76 produced in the Pacific basin and in southern Europe. During both business-as-usual and disruption, the most prevalent Navy fuel quality problem was F-76 instability due to high levels of light cycle oils. 37 refs., 1 fig., 21 tabs.
Date: September 1, 1990
Creator: Hadder, G.R. & Davis, R.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A New Authorization for Use of Military Force Against the Islamic State: Issues and Current Proposals

Description: This report focuses on several proposals for a new Authorization for Use of Military Force (AUMF) specifically targeting the Islamic State made during the 113th and 114th Congresses. It includes a brief review of existing authorities and AUMFs, as well as a discussion of issues related to various provisions included in existing and proposed AUMFs that both authorize and limit presidential use of military force. Appendices provide a comparative analysis of similar provisions in new AUMFs proposed in the 113th and 114th Congresses. This report will be updated to reflect congressional activity.
Date: January 15, 2016
Creator: Weed, Matthew C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A New Authorization for Use of Military Force Against the Islamic State: Issues and Current Proposals

Description: This report focuses on several proposals for a new Authorization for Use of Military Force (AUMF) specifically targeting the Islamic State made during the 113th and 114th Congresses. It includes a brief review of existing authorities and AUMFs, as well as a discussion of issues related to various provisions included in existing and proposed AUMFs that both authorize and limit presidential use of military force. Appendices provide a comparative analysis of similar provisions in new AUMFs proposed in the 113th and 114th Congresses. This report will be updated to reflect congressional activity.
Date: February 21, 2017
Creator: Weed, Matthew C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Nuclear deterrence and disarmament after the Cold War

Description: During the Cold War, nuclear arms control measures were shaped significantly by nuclear doctrine. Consequently, the negotiation of arms control agreements often became a battleground for different nuclear strategies. The Cold War between the United States and the Soviet Union has been declared over. Today, both nuclear weapons policies and arms control objectives are again being reviewed. This document discusses points of this review.
Date: March 1, 1995
Creator: Lehman, R.F. II
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Nuclear Weapons in U.S. National Security Policy: Past, Present, and Prospects

Description: This report highlights the differences between the construct of tailored deterrence and the more general concept of strategic deterrence that guided U.S. nuclear policy during the Cold War. It then identifies a number of issues that Congress might address when it reviews these differences, including the question of whether detailed and tailored attack plans are more likely to enhance deterrence or more likely to lead to the early use of nuclear weapons, and the question of whether tailored deterrence provides any guidance about the future size and structure of U.S. nuclear forces.
Date: December 30, 2008
Creator: Woolf, Amy F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Nuclear Weapons in U.S. National Security Policy: Past, Present, and Prospects

Description: This report highlights the differences between the construct of tailored deterrence and the more general concept of strategic deterrence that guided U.S. nuclear policy during the Cold War. It then identifies issues that Congress might address when it reviews these differences.
Date: January 21, 2010
Creator: Woolf, Amy F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Nuclear weapons, nuclear effects, nuclear war

Description: This paper provides a brief and mostly non-technical description of the militarily important features of nuclear weapons, of the physical phenomena associated with individual explosions, and of the expected or possible results of the use of many weapons in a nuclear war. Most emphasis is on the effects of so-called ``strategic exchanges.``
Date: August 20, 1991
Creator: Bing, G. F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

OOTW Force Design Tools

Description: This report documents refined requirements for tools to aid the process of force design in Operations Other Than War (OOTWs). It recommends actions for the creation of one tool and work on other tools relating to mission planning. It also identifies the governmental agencies and commands with interests in each tool, from whom should come the user advisory groups overseeing the respective tool development activities. The understanding of OOTWs and their analytical support requirements has matured to the point where action can be taken in three areas: force design, collaborative analysis, and impact analysis. While the nature of the action and the length of time before complete results can be expected depends on the area, in each case the action should begin immediately. Force design for OOTWs is not a technically difficult process. Like force design for combat operations, it is a process of matching the capabilities of forces against the specified and implied tasks of the operation, considering the constraints of logistics, transport and force availabilities. However, there is a critical difference that restricts the usefulness of combat force design tools for OOTWs: the combat tools are built to infer non-combat capability requirements from combat capability requirements and cannot reverse the direction of the inference, as is required for OOTWs. Recently, OOTWs have played a larger role in force assessment, system effectiveness and tradeoff analysis, and concept and doctrine development and analysis. In the first Quadrennial Defense Review (QDR), each of the Services created its own OOTW force design tool. Unfortunately, the tools address different parts of the problem and do not coordinate the use of competing capabilities. These tools satisfied the immediate requirements of the QDR, but do not provide a long-term cost-effective solution.
Date: May 1, 1999
Creator: Bell, R.E.; Hartley, D.S.III & Packard, S.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Operations other than war: Requirements for analysis tools research report

Description: This report documents the research effort to determine the requirements for new or improved analysis tools to support decisions at the strategic and operational levels for military Operations Other than War (OOTW). The work was performed for the Commander in Chief, U.S. Pacific Command (USCINCPAC). The data collection was based on workshops attended by experts in OOTWs: analysis personnel from each of the Combatant Commands, the Services, the Office of the Secretary of Defense (OSD), the Joint Staff, and other knowledgeable personnel. Further data were gathered from other workshops and conferences and from the literature. The results of this research begin with the creation of a taxonomy of OOTWs: categories of operations, attributes of operations, and tasks requiring analytical support. The tasks are connected to the Joint Staff`s Universal Joint Task List (UJTL). Historical OOTWs are analyzed to produce frequency distributions by category and responsible CINC. The analysis products are synthesized into a list of requirements for analytical tools and definitions of the requirements. The report concludes with a timeline or roadmap for satisfying the requirements.
Date: December 1, 1996
Creator: Hartley, D.S. III
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Optimization of stability index versus first strike cost

Description: This note studies the impact of maximizing the stability index rather than minimizing the first strike cost in choosing offensive missile allocations. It does so in the context of a model in which exchanges between vulnerable missile forces are modeled probabilistically, converted into first and second strike costs through approximations to the value target sets at risk, and the stability index is taken to be their ratio. The value of the allocation that minimizes the first strike cost for both attack preferences are derived analytically. The former recovers results derived earlier. The latter leads to an optimum at unity allocation for which the stability index is determined analytically. For values of the attack preference greater than about unity, maximizing the stability index increases the cost of striking first 10--15%. For smaller values of the attack preference, maximizing the index increases the second strike cost a similar amount. Both are stabilizing, so if both sides could be trusted to target on missiles in order to minimize damage to value and maximize stability, the stability index for vulnerable missiles could be increased by about 15%. However, that would increase the cost to the first striker by about 15%. It is unclear why--having decided to strike--he would do so in a way that would increase damage to himself.
Date: May 1, 1997
Creator: Canavan, G. H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Plus c`est la meme chose: The future of nuclear weapons in Europe

Description: Since the end of the Cold War, the United States perhaps more than any other nuclear weapon state has deeply questioned the future role of nuclear weapons, both in a strategic sense and in Europe. It is probably the United States that has raised the most questions about the continuing need for and efficacy of nuclear weapons, and has expressed the greatest concerns about the negative consequences of continuing nuclear weapons deployment. In the US, this period of questioning has now come to a pause, if not a conclusion. In late 1994 the United States decided to continue to pursue reductions in numbers of nuclear weapons as well as other changes designed to reduce the dangers associated with the possession of nuclear weapons. But at the same time the US concluded that some number of nuclear forces would continue to be needed for national security for the foreseeable future. These necessary nuclear forces include a continuing but greatly reduced stockpile of nuclear bombs deployed in Europe under NATO`s New Strategic Concept. If further changes to the US position on nuclear weapons in Europe are to occur, it is likely to be after many years, and only in the context of dramatic additional improvements in the political and geo-political climate in and around Europe. The future role of nuclear weapons in Europe, as discussed in this report, depends in part on past and future decisions by the United States. but it must also be noted that other states that deploy nuclear weapons in Europe--Britain, France, and Russia, as well as the NATO alliance--have shown little inclination to discontinue their deployment of such weapons, whatever the United States might choose to do in the future.
Date: July 1, 1996
Creator: Maaranen, S.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

PORTSIM: An object-oriented port simulation

Description: The development of an object-oriented port simulation (PORTSIM) that addresses military mobility issues will be described, with a brief description of the tool selection process. This system provides users with (1) a graphical user interface, (2) the ability to simulate military units through a specified port, with each individual cargo item (i.e. piece of equipment) represented, (3) utilization statistics for all port resources e.g. gates, staging areas, berths, inspectors, and material handling equipments, (4) utilization statistics for ships that arrive at the port, and (5) a graphical dynamic animation that allows for identification of bottlenecks and facilitates the playing of what-if scenarios to maximize throughput. Cargo is simulated from the time it arrives at a gate or end ramp to the time it is loaded onto a ship. Animation is directly integrated with the simulation to allow for modifications to the scenario while the simulation is running and to have the new parameters used from that point forward in time. The simulation is flexible and allows for multiple cargo types (breakbulk, container, and roll-on/roll-off) and multiple ship types.
Date: July 1, 1995
Creator: Nevins, M.R.; Macal, C.M. & Joines, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Quotas for CFE Treaty declared site inspections for baseline validation

Description: The CFE Treaty will provide for limits on NATO and WTO forces, particularly tanks, armored personnel carriers, artillery, and helicopters. In addition to the overall limits on TLEs in the ATTU zone, there are expected to be secondary limits on single country forces, limits on forces based in foreign nations, and geographic sublimits. To help validate WTO declarations of baseline forces, the treaty may provide for on-site inspections by NATO of declared WTO basing facilities. One important unresolved issue concerning baseline declared-site OSIs is the quota of such inspections allowed each country. This report presents a decision analysis and evaluation in support of recommendations for resolving this and related issues. It also indentifies key policy decisions that impact the determination of the number of declared-site OSIs. These decisions are: Desired probabilities of detecting a violation and of falsely accusing WTO; Trade-off between improved verification and the intrusiveness of additional OSIs; Force strength constituting a militarily significant violation; and Degree of coordination with and reliance on inspections by NATO allies. 10 figs.
Date: October 2, 1990
Creator: Strait, R.S. & Sicherman, A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Realistic warhead and blast shield testing of chemical energy tandem warhead systems for advanced antitank missiles

Description: The results of dynamic sled track performance testing of advanced tandem configuration shaped-charge warheads against multiple-reactive-element tank armors are presented. Tandem configurations utilizing both currently fielded and experimental shaped-charge warheads were tested. Sled velocities used were between 400 and 1100 ft/s (Mach number 0.35 to 0.95), typical of the terminal approach velocity of TOW-type antitank missiles. High-speed motion pictures (5000 frames/s) of the sled in operation and a typical mock missile'' warhead package approaching the target are shown. Details of the sled design and fabrication and of the warhead package design and fabrication are presented. Sled track instrumentation is discussed. This instrumentation includes foil make/break switches and associated time interval meters (TIM) and digital delay units (DDU), magnetic Hall-effect transistors for measuring sled trajectory, and flash x-rays (FXR). Methods for timing the x-rays are presented. Schematic functional diagrams of the experimental setups are also given. Evidence of the ability to accurately time the delay between precursor and main warheads for even very long time delays are presented. FXR pictures illustrate the dynamics of the interaction of the jets with various target elements. The interaction dynamics of the jets is discussed in relation to the overall penetration performance of the tandem warhead. The use of x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy to help diagnose interaction dynamics is illustrated. The results of a test utilizing the missile propulsion rocket motor as a blast shield is presented in this paper. 2 refs., 22 figs.
Date: January 1, 1990
Creator: Fradkin, D.B.; Hull, L.M. & Laabs, G.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department