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Fluorescence cross section measurements of biological agent simulants

Description: Fluorescence is a powerful technique that has potential uses in detection and characterization of biological aerosols both in the battlefield and in civilian environments. Fluorescence techniques can be used with ultraviolet (UV) light detection and ranging (LIDAR) equipment to detect biological aerosol clouds at a distance, to provide early warning of a biological attack, and to track an potentially noxious cloud. Fluorescence can also be used for detection in a point sensor to monitor biological materials and to distinguish agents from benign aerosols. This work is part of a continuing program by the Army`s Chemical and Biological Defense Command to characterized the optical properties of biological agents. Reported here are ultraviolet fluorescence measurements of Bacillus megaterium and Bacillus Globigii aerosols suspended in an electrodynamic particle trap. Fluorescence spectra of a common atmospheric aerosol, pine pollen, are also presented.
Date: November 1, 1996
Creator: Stephens, J.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Freedom to mix vulnerable offensive and defensive forces

Description: The freedom to mix offense and defense to expand without diminishing either side`s second strike capability is shown to be counterproductive at large numbers of missiles; effective at intermediate numbers; and progressively less effective at modest numbers. Solutions are less stable for large second strikes.
Date: September 1, 1998
Creator: Canavan, G. H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Future directions for arms control and nonproliferation. Conference summary

Description: This report provides a summary of the presentations and discussions at the Spring 1994 CNSN-Wilton Park Conference. The Conference was one of a series on US-European security cooperation organized by The Center for National Security Negotiations (CNSN) of Science Applications International Corporation. These conferences bring together government and non-government experts, primarily from the United States and Europe, to discuss a range of regional and global security issues. The conferences provide an opportunity to explore, in a frank and off-the-record environment, common interests and concerns, as well as differences in approach that affect trans-Atlantic cooperation. This report is divided into the following three areas: (1) implementation of existing and pending agreements; (2) non-proliferation: prospects for trans-Atlantic cooperation; and (3) future directions in arms control.
Date: July 6, 1994
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The future of nonnuclear strategic weapons. Final summary report

Description: In this brief study, Pan Heuristics (PAN) has (1) evaluated the future importance of nonnuclear strategic weapons (NNSW), (2) considered their impact on forces and operations, and (3) investigated the technical requirements to support NNSW. In drawing conclusions, PAN has emphasized aspects that might be important to Los Alamos National Laboratory over the long run. It presents them here in a format similar to that used in a briefing at the laboratory. This paper reflects independent PAN research as well as conclusions drawn from discussions with other offices and individuals involved in nonnuclear strategic weapons development.
Date: January 31, 1989
Creator: Brody, R. & Digby, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Glider communications and controls for the sea sentry mission.

Description: This report describes a system level study on the use of a swarm of sea gliders to detect, confirm and kill littoral submarine threats. The report begins with a description of the problem and derives the probability of detecting a constant speed threat without networking. It was concluded that glider motion does little to improve this probability unless the speed of a glider is greater than the speed of the threat. Therefore, before detection, the optimal character for a swarm of gliders is simply to lie in wait for the detection of a threat. The report proceeds by describing the effect of noise on the localization of a threat once initial detection is achieved. This noise is estimated as a function of threat location relative to the glider and is temporally reduced through the use of an information or Kalman filtering. In the next section, the swarm probability of confirming and killing a threat is formulated. Results are compared to a collection of stationary sensors. These results show that once a glider has the ability to move faster than the threat, the performance of the swarm is equal to the performance of a stationary swarm of gliders with confirmation and kill ranges equal to detection range. Moreover, at glider speeds greater than the speed of the threat, swarm performance becomes a weak function of speed. At these speeds swarm performance is dominated by detection range. Therefore, to future enhance swarm performance or to reduce the number of gliders required for a given performance, detection range must be increased. Communications latency is also examined. It was found that relatively large communication delays did little to change swarm performance. Thus gliders may come to the surface and use SATCOMS to effectively communicate in this application.
Date: March 1, 2005
Creator: Feddema, John Todd & Dohner, Jeffrey Lynn
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Graphics development of DCOR: Deterministic combat model of Oak Ridge

Description: DCOR is a user-friendly computer implementation of a deterministic combat model developed at ORNL. To make the interpretation of the results more intuitive, a conversion of the numerical solution to a graphic animation sequence of battle evolution is desirable. DCOR uses a coarse computational spatial mesh superimposed on the battlefield. This research is aimed at developing robust methods for computing the position of the combative units over the continuum (and also pixeled) battlefield, from DCOR`s discrete-variable solution representing the density of each force type evaluated at gridpoints. Three main problems have been identified and solutions have been devised and implemented in a new visualization module of DCOR. First, there is the problem of distributing the total number of objects, each representing a combative unit of each force type, among the gridpoints at each time level of the animation. This problem is solved by distributing, for each force type, the total number of combative units, one by one, to the gridpoint with the largest calculated number of units. Second, there is the problem of distributing the number of units assigned to each computational gridpoint over the battlefield area attributed to that point. This problem is solved by distributing the units within that area by taking into account the influence of surrounding gridpoints using linear interpolation. Finally, time interpolated solutions must be generated to produce a sufficient number of frames to create a smooth animation sequence. Currently, enough frames may be generated either by direct computation via the PDE solver or by using linear programming techniques to linearly interpolate intermediate frames between calculated frames.
Date: October 1, 1992
Creator: Hunt, G. & Azmy, Y. Y.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The history of NATO TNF policy: The role of studies, analysis and exercises conference proceedings. Volume 1, Introduction and summary

Description: This conference was organized to study and analyze the role of simulation, analysis, modeling, and exercises in the history of NATO policy. The premise was not that the results of past studies will apply to future policy, but rather that understanding what influenced the decision process -- and how -- would be of value. The structure of the conference was built around discussion panels. The panels were augmented by a series of papers and presentations focusing on particular TNF events, issues, studies or exercise. The conference proceedings consist of three volumes. This volume, Volume 1, contains the conference introduction, agenda, biographical sketches of principal participants, and analytical summary of the presentations and discussion panels. Volume 2 contains a short introduction and the papers and presentations from the conference. Volume 3 contains selected papers by Brig. Gen. Robert C. Richardson III (Ret.).
Date: February 1, 1994
Creator: Rinne, R. L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The history of NATO TNF policy: The role of studies, analysis and exercises conference proceedings. Volume 2: Papers and presentations

Description: This conference was organized to study and analyze the role of simulation, analysis, modeling, and exercises in the history of NATO policy. The premise was not that the results of past studies will apply to future policy, but rather that understanding what influenced the decision process -- and how -- would be of value. The structure of the conference was built around discussion panels. The panels were augmented by a series of papers and presentations focusing on particular TNF events, issues, studies, or exercises. The conference proceedings consist of three volumes. Volume 1 contains the conference introduction, agenda, biographical sketches of principal participants, and analytical summary of the presentations and panels. This volume contains a short introduction and the papers and presentations from the conference. Volume 3 contains selected papers by Brig. Gen. Robert C. Richardson III (Ret.). Individual papers in this volume were abstracted and indexed for the database.
Date: February 1994
Creator: Rinne, R. L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The history of NATO TNF policy: The role of studies, analysis and exercises conference proceedings. Volume 3: Papers by Gen. Robert C. Richardson III (Ret.)

Description: This conference was organized to study and analyze the role of simulation, analysis, modeling, and exercises in the history of NATO policy. The premise was not that the results of past studies will apply to future policy, but rather that understanding what influenced the decision process-and how-would be of value. The structure of the conference was built around discussion panels. The panels were augmented by a series of papers and presentations focusing on particular TNF events, issues, studies, or exercises. The conference proceedings consist of three volumes. Volume 1 contains the conference introduction, agenda, biographical sketches of principal participants, and analytical summary of the presentations and discussion panels. Volume 2 contains a short introduction and the papers and presentations from the conference. This volume contains selected papers by Brig. Gen. Robert C. Richardson III (Ret.).
Date: February 1, 1994
Creator: Rinne, R. L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Impact of a reduced nuclear weapons stockpile on strategic stability

Description: This presentation is to discuss the impact of a reduced nuclear weapons stockpile on the strategic stability. Methodologies used to study strategic stability issues include what are basically strategic-force exchange models. These models are used to simulate a massive nuclear exchange in which one side attacks and the other side retaliates. These models have been of interest to the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI) program. Researchers have been looking at issues concerning the stability of the transition period, during which some defenses have been deployed and during which deterrence and war-fighting capability reply partly on defense and partly on offense. Also, more recently, with interest in the Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty (START) and force reductions beyond START, the same calculation engines have been used to examine the impact of reduced forces on strategic stability. For both the SDI and the START reduction cases, exchange models are able to address only a rather narrow class of strategic stability issues. Other broader stability questions that are unrelated to nuclear weapons or that relate to nuclear weapons but are not addressed by the calculational tools which are not included in this discussion. 6 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab. (BN)
Date: March 20, 1991
Creator: Chrzanowski, P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

An implementation of a medium resolution minefield model in the Joint Conflict Model

Description: An implementation of a new, flexible, and realistic representation of conventional minefields in the Joint Conflict Model (JCM) is presented. The model includes important aspects of minefield effects on battlefield entities and of breaching devices on minefields. The model is designed at ``medium resolution,`` that is, it is general enough to depict a wide variety of tactical situations accurately; however, it only represents tactically significant aspects of mine warfare, discarding or aggregating details, thus minimizing computer memory and speed requirements. This paper describes the model in detail, its implementation in the JCM simulation code, and its use in a preliminary analysis effort related to the effect of delay on the tactical battlefield.
Date: January 13, 1995
Creator: Pimper, J.E. & Matone, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Implications of a North Korean Nuclear Weapons Program

Description: The Democratic People`s Republic of Korea (DPRK) is one of the Cold War`s last remaining totalitarian regimes. Rarely has any society been as closed to outside influences and so distant from political, economic, and military developments around the globe. In 1991 and in 1992, however, this dictatorship took a number of political steps which increased Pyongyang`s interaction with the outside world. Although North Korea`s style of engagement with the broader international community involved frequent pauses and numerous steps backward, many observers believed that North Korea was finally moving to end its isolated, outlaw status. As the end of 1992 approached, however, delay and obstruction by Pyongyang became intense as accumulating evidence suggested that the DPRK, in violation of the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT), was seeking to develop nuclear weapons. On March 12, 1993, North Korea announced that it would not accept additional inspections proposed by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to resolve concerns about possible violations and instead would withdraw from the Treaty. Pyongyang`s action raised the specter that, instead of a last act of the Cold War, North Korea`s diplomatic maneuvering would unravel the international norms that were to be the basis of stability and peace in the post-Cold War era. Indeed, the discovery that North Korea was approaching the capability to produce nuclear weapons suggested that the nuclear threat, which had been successfully managed throughout the Cold War era, could increase in the post-Cold War era.
Date: July 1, 1993
Creator: Lehman, R. F. II
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

An improved user interface for ASSESS/Neutralization

Description: The ASSESS Neutralization Analysis module (Neutralization) is part of Analytic System and Software for Evaluation of Safeguards and Security, ASSESS, a vulnerability assessment tool. Neutralization models a fire fight engagement between security inspectors (SIs) and adversaries. Since version 1.0 of Neutralization was released in 1989, experience has shown that several features of the user interface should be improved. This report describes the improvements that have been implemented, which simplify operation by consolidating all capabilities under a single mode of operation, remove many restrictions on editing, and concentrate more information into fewer types of printed reports. Every adversary and SI combatant is named and described individually. Time to communicate orders is specified for each SI combatant. Adversaries and SIs can be reinforced. SI posting as well deployment destination is labeled. Scenario details can be revised without losing all completed event information. New on-screen summaries spell out characteristics, minimizing abbreviations. Neutralization will read files created by the previous version and permit the user to enter the additional labels supported in the new version. As described here, Neutralization now has an interface that handles more information, but is easier and faster to use.
Date: July 1, 1993
Creator: Paulus, W. K.; Mondragon, J. & Sedam, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

In Brief: Assessing DOD's New Strategic Guidance

Description: On January 5, 2012, President Obama announced new defense strategic guidance entitled "Sustaining U.S. Global Leadership: Priorities for 21st Century Defense." This report highlights and analyzes key strategic-level issues raised by the new guidance.
Date: January 12, 2012
Creator: Dale, Catherine & Towell, Pat
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The incorporation of high resolution climatological data into environmental tactical decision aids.

Description: The environment can significantly impact the performance of weapons systems and how they are used in a theater of operations. A tool has been developed by the US Army Research Laboratory (ARL) to enable operators to assess the impact of environmental factors on the performance of military systems, subsystems, and components. The ARL system, the Integrated Weather Effects Decision Aid (IWEDA) takes weather and environmental data and compares them to a set of rules that relate environmental parameters to weapons system performance. The results from the IWEDA system can enable operators to identify regions and time periods when weapons system performance may be marginal or unfavorable. The Department of Defense (DOD) Air and Space Natural Environment (ASNE) Executive Agents have developed a program, the Advanced Climate Modeling and Environmental Simulations (ACMES), to produce high resolution gridded data for use in generating high resolution climate statistics from simulated weather observations at any desired location around the world. It is intended that data from the ACMES effort could be used by commanders to assess the environmental effects on operations. This paper describes an effort to use data generated from ACMES to drive the IWEDA rules on system performance. The results from this effort are high resolution, gridded values of weapons performance statistics that can be used to support the mission planning cycle.
Date: September 23, 1999
Creator: Hummel, J. R.; Campbell, A. P.; Kehrer, M. L.; Lurie, G. R. & Simunich, K. L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Joint Chiefs of Staff: Notes

Description: The purpose of the paper is to state the rationale upon which the Joint Chiefs of Staff (JCS) bases its opposition to further extension of the Limited Test Ban Treaty (LTBT). The argumentation of the paper is hinged primarily on the contention that the USSR is ahead of the US in nuclear weapon technology. Accordingly, there is much for the US to do, so that the Soviets do not, primarily through the deployment of an Anti-Ballistic Missile [ABM] system, alter the strategic balanc the US should not agree to further restrictions on testing which would prevent the US from correcting the deficiencies of its strategic deterrent systems and making developments necessary for a Nike-Zeus warhead.
Date: August 29, 1966
Creator: Heckrotte, W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Joint Service Common Operating Environment (COE) Common Geographic Information System functional requirements

Description: In the context of this document and COE, the Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are decision support systems involving the integration of spatially referenced data in a problem solving environment. They are digital computer systems for capturing, processing, managing, displaying, modeling, and analyzing geographically referenced spatial data which are described by attribute data and location. The ability to perform spatial analysis and the ability to combine two or more data sets to create new spatial information differentiates a GIS from other computer mapping systems. While the CCGIS allows for data editing and input, its primary purpose is not to prepare data, but rather to manipulate, analyte, and clarify it. The CCGIS defined herein provides GIS services and resources including the spatial and map related functionality common to all subsystems contained within the COE suite of C4I systems. The CCGIS, which is an integral component of the COE concept, relies on the other COE standard components to provide the definition for other support computing services required.
Date: June 1992
Creator: Meitzler, W. D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Limits on linearity of missile allocation optimization

Description: Optimizations of missile allocation based on linearized exchange equations produce accurate allocations, but the limits of validity of the linearization are not known. These limits are explored in the context of the upload of weapons by one side to initially small, equal forces of vulnerable and survivable weapons. The analysis compares analytic and numerical optimizations and stability induces based on aggregated interactions of the two missile forces, the first and second strikes they could deliver, and they resulting costs. This note discusses the costs and stability indices induced by unilateral uploading of weapons to an initially symmetrical low force configuration. These limits are quantified for forces with a few hundred missiles by comparing analytic and numerical optimizations of first strike costs. For forces of 100 vulnerable and 100 survivable missiles on each side, the analytic optimization agrees closely with the numerical solution. For 200 vulnerable and 200 survivable missiles on each side, the analytic optimization agrees with the induces to within about 10%, but disagrees with the allocation of the side with more weapons by about 50%. The disagreement comes from the interaction of the possession of more weapons with the shift of allocation from missiles to value that they induce.
Date: December 1, 1997
Creator: Canavan, G. H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Manhattan Project: Making the atomic bomb

Description: This article is a short history of the origins and development of the American atomic bomb program during World War II. Beginning with the scientific developments of the pre-war years, the monograph details the role of US government in conducting a secret, nationwide enterprise that took science from the laboratory and into combat with an entirely new type of weapon. The monograph concludes with a discussion of the immediate postwar period, the debate over the Atomic Energy Act of 1946, and the founding of the Atomic Energy Commission.
Date: September 1, 1994
Creator: Gosling, F. G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A medium resolution minefield model suitable for entity-level resolution combat simulations

Description: A new, flexible, and realistic representation of conventional minefields in entity-level resolution combat simulations is presented. The model includes important aspects of minefield effects on battlefield entities and of breaching devices on minefields. The model is designed at ``medium resolution,`` that is, it is general enough to depict a wide variety of tactical situations accurately; however, it only represents tactically significant aspects of mine warfare, discarding or aggregating details, thus minimizing computer memory and speed requirements. This paper describes the model in detail, its implementation in the Janus simulation code, and its use in a preliminary analysis effort related to the effect of delay on the tactical battlefield.
Date: June 9, 1994
Creator: Powell, E. T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

MEDUSA: A concept for countering multiple targets from theater ballistic missiles. Final report

Description: We feel that the concept of intercepting a fractionated threat from a tactical ballistic missile is potentially feasible and would have very high payoff for the defense. Many other concepts have been suggested to solve this problem, although they have mostly been more futuristic approaches, e.g. aircrafty based lasers. We also believe that current technologies are not likely to be adequate for the expected types of very small submunition payloads, especially in the presence of relatively simple countermeasures. The MEDUSA concept, or its clones, may very well provide a vehicle for the study of less stressing threats, e.g. separating warheads and provide a lethality enhancement for non-deployed payloads. An opportunity also exists to investigate alternative technologies, such as the explosively-formed ``disk`` idea. The use of high-precision, limited field-of-view sensor-fuzed munitions is a subject of interest in other Defense Department programs and may have application to the important area of theater missile defense.
Date: April 1, 1994
Creator: Peglow, S. G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Methods for developing and validating survivability distributions

Description: A previous report explored and discussed statistical methods and procedures that may be applied to validate the survivability of a complex system of systems that cannot be tested as an entity. It described a methodology where Monte Carlo simulation was used to develop the system survivability distribution from the component distributions using a system model that registers the logical interactions of the components to perform system functions. This paper discusses methods that can be used to develop the required survivability distributions based upon three sources of knowledge. These are (1) available test results; (2) little or no available test data, but a good understanding of the physical laws and phenomena which can be applied by computer simulation; and (3) neither test data nor adequate knowledge of the physics are known, in which case, one must rely upon, and quantify, the judgement of experts. This paper describes the relationship between the confidence bounds that can be placed on survivability and the number of tests conducted. It discusses the procedure for developing system level survivability distributions from the distributions for lower levels of integration. It demonstrates application of these techniques by defining a communications network for a Hypothetical System Architecture. A logic model for the performance of this communications network is developed, as well as the survivability distributions for the nodes and links based on two alternate data sets, reflecting the effects of increased testing of all elements. It then shows how this additional testing could be optimized by concentrating only on those elements contained in the low-order fault sets which the methodology identifies.
Date: October 1, 1993
Creator: Williams, R. L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Military airborne and maritime application for cooperative behaviors.

Description: As part of DARPA's Software for Distributed Robotics Program within the Information Processing Technologies Office (IPTO), Sandia National Laboratories was tasked with identifying military airborne and maritime missions that require cooperative behaviors as well as identifying generic collective behaviors and performance metrics for these missions. This report documents this study. A prioritized list of general military missions applicable to land, air, and sea has been identified. From the top eight missions, nine generic reusable cooperative behaviors have been defined. A common mathematical framework for cooperative controls has been developed and applied to several of the behaviors. The framework is based on optimization principles and has provably convergent properties. A three-step optimization process is used to develop the decentralized control law that minimizes the behavior's performance index. A connective stability analysis is then performed to determine constraints on the communication sample period and the local control gains. Finally, the communication sample period for four different network protocols is evaluated based on the network graph, which changes throughout the task. Using this mathematical framework, two metrics for evaluating these behaviors are defined. The first metric is the residual error in the global performance index that is used to create the behavior. The second metric is communication sample period between robots, which affects the overall time required for the behavior to reach its goal state.
Date: September 1, 2004
Creator: Feddema, John Todd; Byrne, Raymond Harry & Robinett, Rush D. III
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department