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Access to Film and Video Works: Surrogates for Moving Image Documents

Description: This doctoral dissertation discusses access to film and video works. Physical and intellectual access to moving image documents is insufficient, often insignificant, at the level of the individual user. Existing access tools suffer from a lack of recognition of the differences between linguistic text communication and image communication. Browsing and relevance judgements are made difficult by the physical realities of film and video documents - one cannot flip through them - and by the habits of serial and passive viewing.
Date: 1984
Creator: O'Connor, Brian Clark
Partner: UNT College of Information

The Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (AHTR) for Producing Hydrogen to Manufacture Liquid Fuels

Description: Conventional world oil production is expected to peak within a decade. Shortfalls in production of liquid fuels (gasoline, diesel, and jet fuel) from conventional oil sources are expected to be offset by increased production of fuels from heavy oils and tar sands that are primarily located in the Western Hemisphere (Canada, Venezuela, the United States, and Mexico). Simultaneously, there is a renewed interest in liquid fuels from biomass, such as alcohol; but, biomass production requires fertilizer. Massive quantities of hydrogen (H2) are required (1) to convert heavy oils and tar sands to liquid fuels and (2) to produce fertilizer for production of biomass that can be converted to liquid fuels. If these liquid fuels are to be used while simultaneously minimizing greenhouse emissions, nonfossil methods for the production of H2 are required. Nuclear energy can be used to produce H2. The most efficient methods to produce H2 from nuclear energy involve thermochemical cycles in which high-temperature heat (700 to 850 C) and water are converted to H2 and oxygen. The peak nuclear reactor fuel and coolant temperatures must be significantly higher than the chemical process temperatures to transport heat from the reactor core to an intermediate heat transfer loop and from the intermediate heat transfer loop to the chemical plant. The reactor temperatures required for H2 production are at the limits of practical engineering materials. A new high-temperature reactor concept is being developed for H2 and electricity production: the Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (AHTR). The fuel is a graphite-matrix, coated-particle fuel, the same type that is used in modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (MHTGRs). The coolant is a clean molten fluoride salt with a boiling point near 1400 C. The use of a liquid coolant, rather than helium, reduces peak reactor fuel and coolant temperatures 100 to 200 C relative to those ...
Date: October 6, 2004
Creator: Forsberg, C. W.; Peterson, P. F. & Ott, L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Anaerobic U(IV) Bio-oxidation and the Resultant Remobilization of Uranium in Contaminated Sediments

Description: A proposed strategy for the remediation of uranium (U) contaminated sites is based on immobilizing U by reducing the oxidized soluble U, U(VI), to form a reduced insoluble end product, U(IV). Due to the use of nitric acid in the processing of nuclear fuels, nitrate is often a co-contaminant found in many of the environments contaminated with uranium. Recent studies indicate that nitrate inhibits U(VI) reduction in sediment slurries. However, the mechanism responsible for the apparent inhibition of U(VI) reduction is unknown, i.e. preferential utilization of nitrate as an electron acceptor, direct biological oxidation of U(IV) coupled to nitrate reduction, and/or abiotic oxidation by intermediates of nitrate reduction. Recent studies indicates that direct biological oxidation of U(IV) coupled to nitrate reduction may exist in situ, however, to date no organisms have been identified that can grow by this metabolism. In an effort to evaluate the potential for nitrate-dependent bio-oxidation of U(IV) in anaerobic sedimentary environments, we have initiated the enumeration of nitrate-dependent U(IV) oxidizing bacteria. Sediments, soils, and groundwater from uranium (U) contaminated sites, including subsurface sediments from the NABIR Field Research Center (FRC), as well as uncontaminated sites, including subsurface sediments from the NABIR FRC and Longhorn Army Ammunition Plant, Texas, lake sediments, and agricultural field soil, sites served as the inoculum source. Enumeration of the nitrate-dependent U(IV) oxidizing microbial population in sedimentary environments by most probable number technique have revealed sedimentary microbial populations ranging from 9.3 x 101 - 2.4 x 103 cells (g sediment)-1 in both contaminated and uncontaminated sites. Interestingly uncontaminated subsurface sediments (NABIR FRC Background core FB618 and Longhorn Texas Core BH2-18) both harbored the most numerous nitrate-dependent U(IV) oxidizing population 2.4 x 103 cells (g sediment)-1. The nitrate-dependent U(IV) oxidizing microbial population in groundwaters is less numerous ranging from 0 cells mL-1 (Well FW300, ...
Date: June 1, 2005
Creator: Coates, John D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Analytical and Experimental Investigation of Mixing in Large Passive Containment Volumes

Description: This final report details results from the past three years of the three-year UC Berkeley NEER investigation of mixing phenomena in large-scale passive reactor containments. We have completed all of our three-year deliverables specified in our proposal, as summarized for each deliverable in the body of this report, except for the experiments of steam condensation in the presence of noncondensable gas. We have particularly exiting results from the experiments studying the mixing in large insulated containment with a vertical cooling plate. These experiments now have shown why augmentation has been observed in wall-condensation experiments due to the momentum of the steam break-flow entering large volumes. More importantly, we also have shown that the forced-jet augmentation can be predicted using relatively simple correlations, and that it is independent of the break diameter and depends only on the break flow orientation, location, and momentum. This suggests that we will now be able to take credit for this augmentation in reactor safety analysis, improving safety margins for containment structures. We have finished the version 1 of 1-D Lagrangian flow and heat transfer code BMIX++. This version has ability to solve many complex stratified problems, such as multi-components problems, multi-enclosures problems (two enclosures connected by one connection for the current version), incompressible and compressible problems, multi jets, plumes, sinks in one enclosure problems, problems with wall conduction, and the combinations of the above problems. We believe the BMIX++ code is a very powerful computation tool to study stratified enclosures mixing problems.
Date: October 17, 2002
Creator: Peterson, Per F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Architectural Design Criteria for F-Block Metal Ion Sequestering Agents

Description: The objective of this project is to provide the means to optimize ligand architecture for f-block metal recognition. Our strategy builds on an innovative and successful molecular modeling approach in developing polyether ligand design criteria for the alkali and alkaline earth cations. The hypothesis underlying this proposal is that differences in metal ion binding with multidentate ligands bearing the same number and type of donor groups are primarily attributable to intramolecular steric factors. We propose quantifying these steric factors through the application of molecular mechanics models. The proposed research involves close integration of theoretical and experimental chemistry. The experimental work entails synthesizing novel ligands and experimentally determining structures and binding constants for metal ion complexation by series of ligands in which architecture is systematically varied. The theoretical work entails using electronic structure calculations to parameterize a molecular mechanics force field for a range of metal ions and ligand types. The resulting molecular mechanics force field will be used to predict low energy structures for unidentate, bidentate, and multidentate ligands and their metal complexes through conformational searches. Results will be analyzed to assess the relative importance of several steric factors including optimal M-L length, optimal geometry at the metal center, optimal geometry at the donor atoms (complementarity), and conformation prior to binding (preorganization). An accurate set of criteria for the design of ligand architecture will be obtained from these results. These criteria will enable researchers to target ligand structures for synthesis and thereby dramatically reduce the time and cost associated with metal-specific ligand development.
Date: June 1, 1999
Creator: Hay, Benjamin P.; Roundhill, David M.; Paine Jr., Robert Treat; Raymond, Kenneth N.; Rogers, Robin D.; Hutchison, James E. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Automatic History Matching of Geothermal Field Performance

Description: We have developed inverse modeling capabilities for the multiphase multicomponent numerical simulator TOUGH2 to facilitate automatic history matching and parameter estimation based on data obtained during exploitation of geothermal fields. The ITOUGH2 code allows one to estimate TOUGH2 input parameters based on any type of observation for which a corresponding TOUGH2 output can be calculated. Furthermore, a detailed residual and error analysis is performed, and the uncertainty of model predictions can be evaluated. This paper focuses on the solution of the inverse problem, i.e. the determination of model-related parameters by automatically calibrating a conceptual model of the geothermal system against data obtained during field operation. We first describe the modeling approach used to simulate fluid and heat flow in fractured-porous media. The inverse problem is then formulated, followed by a brief discussion of the optimization algorithm. A sample problem is given to demonstrate the application of the method to geothermal reservoir data.
Date: January 1, 1995
Creator: Finsterle, S. & Pruess, K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Calibration of 3D Upper Mantle Structure in Eurasia Using Regional and Teleseismic Full Waveform Seismic Data

Description: Adequate path calibrations are crucial for improving the accuracy of seismic event location and origin time, size, and mechanism, as required for CTBT monitoring. There is considerable information on structure in broadband seismograms that is currently not fully utilized. The limitations have been largely theoretical. the development and application to solid earth problems of powerful numerical techniques, such as the Spectral Element Method (SEM), has opened a new era, and theoretically, it should be possible to compute the complete predicted wavefield accurately without any restrictions on the strength or spatial extent of heterogeneity. This approach requires considerable computational power, which is currently not fully reachable in practice. We propose an approach which relies on a cascade of increasingly accurate theoretical approximations for the computation of the seismic wavefield to develop a model of regional structure for the area of Eurasia located between longitudes of 30 and 150 degrees E, and latitudes of -10 to 60 degrees North. The selected area is particularly suitable for the purpose of this experiment, as it is highly heterogeneous, presenting a challenge for calibration purposes, but it is well surrounded by earthquake sources and, even though they are sparsely distributed, a significant number of high quality broadband digital stations exist, for which data are readily accessible through IRIS (Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology) and the FDSN (Federation of Digital Seismic Networks). The starting models used will be a combination of a-priori 3D models recently developed for this region, combining various geophysical and seismological data, and a major goal of this study will be to refine these models so as to fit a variety of seismic waveforms and phases.
Date: April 23, 2005
Creator: Romanowicz, Barbara & Panning, Mark
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Calibration of 3D Upper Mantle Structure in Eurasia Using Regional and Teleseismic Full Waveform Seismic Data

Description: Adequate path calibrations are crucial for improving the accuracy of seismic event location and origin time, size, and mechanism, as required for CTBT monitoring. There is considerable information on structure in broadband seismograms that is currently not fully utilized. The limitations have been largely theoretical. the development and application to solid earth problems of powerful numerical techniques, such as the Spectral Element Method (SEM), has opened a new era, and theoretically, it should be possible to compute the complete predicted wavefield accurately without any restrictions on the strength or spatial extent of heterogeneity. This approach requires considerable computational power, which is currently not fully reachable in practice. We propose an approach which relies on a cascade of increasingly accurate theoretical approximations for the computation of the seismic wavefield to develop a model of regional structure for the area of Eurasia located between longitudes of 30 and 150 degrees E, and latitudes of -10 to 60 degrees North. The selected area is particularly suitable for the purpose of this experiment, as it is highly heterogeneous, presenting a challenge for calibration purposes, but it is well surrounded by earthquake sources and, even though they are sparsely distributed, a significant number of high quality broadband digital stations exist, for which data are readily accessible through IRIS (Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology) and the FDSN (Federation of Digital Seismic Networks). The starting models used will be a combination of a-priori 3D models recently developed for this region, combining various geophysical and seismological data, and a major goal of this study will be to refine these models so as to fit a variety of seismic waveforms and phases.
Date: April 23, 2005
Creator: Romanowicz, Barbara & Panning, Mark
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Calibration of 3D Upper Mantle Structure in Eurasia Using Regional and Teleseismic Full Waveform Seismic Data

Description: Adequate path calibrations are crucial for improving the accuracy of seismic event location and origin time, size, and mechanism, as required for CTBT monitoring. There is considerable information on structure in broadband seismograms that is currently not fully utilized. The limitations have been largely theoretical. the development and application to solid earth problems of powerful numerical techniques, such as the Spectral Element Method (SEM), has opened a new era, and theoretically, it should be possible to compute the complete predicted wavefield accurately without any restrictions on the strength or spatial extent of heterogeneity. This approach requires considerable computational power, which is currently not fully reachable in practice. We propose an approach which relies on a cascade of increasingly accurate theoretical approximations for the computation of the seismic wavefield to develop a model of regional structure for the area of Eurasia located between longitudes of 30 and 150 degrees E, and latitudes of -10 to 60 degrees North. The selected area is particularly suitable for the purpose of this experiment, as it is highly heterogeneous, presenting a challenge for calibration purposes, but it is well surrounded by earthquake sources and, even though they are sparsely distributed, a significant number of high quality broadband digital stations exist, for which data are readily accessible through IRIS (Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology) and the FDSN (Federation of Digital Seismic Networks). The starting models used will be a combination of a-priori 3D models recently developed for this region, combining various geophysical and seismological data, and a major goal of this study will be to refine these models so as to fit a variety of seismic waveforms and phases.
Date: April 23, 2005
Creator: Romanowicz, Barbara & Panning, Mark
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Coal surface control for advanced fine coal flotation

Description: The primary objective in the scope of this research project is to develop advanced flotation methods for coal cleaning in order to achieve near total pyritic-sulfur removal at 90% Btu recovery, using coal samples procured from three major US coal seams. Concomitantly, the ash content of these coals is to be reduced to 6% or less. Investigation of mechanisms for the control of coal and pyrite surfaces prior to fine coal flotation is the main aspect of the project objectives. The results of this research are to be made available to ICF Kaiser Engineers who are currently working on the Engineering Development of Advanced Flotation under a separate contract with DOE under the Acid Rain Control Initiative program. A second major objective is to investigate factors involved in the progressive weathering and oxidation of coal that had been exposed to varying degrees of weathering, namely, open to the atmosphere, covered and in an argon-inerted'' atmosphere, over a period of twelve months. After regular intervals of weathering, samples of the three base coals (Illinois No. 6, Pittsburgh No. 8 and Upper Freeport PA) were collected and shipped to both the University of Pittsburgh and the University of California at Berkeley for characterization studies of the weathered material. 29 figs., 29 tabs.
Date: July 30, 1991
Creator: Fuerstenau, D. W.; Sastry, K. V. S.; Hanson, J. S.; Diao, J.; De, A.; Sotillo, F. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Code development incorporating environmental, safety and economic aspects of fusion reactors; Annual progress report

Description: This document is a proposal to continue the authors work on the Environmental, Safety and Economic (ESE) aspects of fusion reactors under DOE contract DE-FR03-89ER52514. The grant objectives continue those from the previous grant: (1) completion of first-generation Environmental, Safety and Economic (ESE) computer modules suitable as integral components of tokamak systems codes. (2) continuation of work on special topics, in support of the above and in response to OFE requests. The proposal also highlights progress on the contract in the twelve months since April, 1992. This has included work with the ARIES and ITER design teams, work on tritium management, studies on materials activation, and calculation of radioactive inventories in fusion reactors.
Date: December 31, 1993
Creator: Fowler, T.K.; Greenspan, E. & Holdren, J.P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Code development incorporating environmental, safety, and economic aspects of fusion reactors (FY 92--94). Final report

Description: This is the Final Report for a three-year (FY 92--94) study of the Environmental, Safety, and Economic (ESE) aspects of fusion energy systems, emphasizing development of computerized approaches suitable for incorporation as modules in fusion system design codes. First, as is reported in Section 2, the authors now have operating a simplified but complete environment and safety evaluation code, BESAFE. The first tests of BESAFE as a module of the SUPERCODE, a design optimization systems code at LLNL, are reported in Section 3. Secondly, as reported in Section 4, the authors have maintained a strong effort in developing fast calculational schemes for activation inventory evaluation. In addition to these major accomplishments, considerable progress has been made on research on specific topics as follows. A tritium modeling code TRIDYN was developed in collaboration with the TSTA group at LANL and the Fusion Nuclear Technology group at UCLA. A simplified algorithm has been derived to calculate the transient temperature profiles in the blanket during accidents. The scheme solves iteratively a system of non-linear ordinary differential equations describing about 10 regions of the blanket by preserving energy balance. The authors have studied the physics and engineering aspects of divertor modeling for safety applications. Several modifications in the automation and characterization of environmental and safety indices have been made. They have applied this work to the environmental and safety comparisons of stainless steel with alternative structural materials for fusion reactors. A methodology in decision analysis utilizing influence and decision diagrams has been developed to model fusion reactor design problems. Most of the work during this funding period has been reported in 26 publications including theses, journal publications, conference papers, and technical reports, as listed in Section 11.
Date: November 1, 1994
Creator: Ho, S.K.; Fowler, T.K. & Holdren, J.P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Collaborative Research: Hydrogeological-Geophysical Methods for Subsurface Site Characterization

Description: The significance of this project is that it addresses the issue of site characterization: not only is this issue a very significant budget item in the site clean-up effort, but also it is now realized that accurate and reliable site characterization is the key to the success of any cleanup effort. Our research objective is to develop methodologies for inexpensive high resolution imaging of natural heterogeneities and for relating these heterogeneities to the hydrogeologic parameters that control flow and contaminant transport. Our focus is to help establish the scientific basis for applying shallow geophysics to hydrogeological problems, through sediment-rock physics. This includes identifying uncertainties in applying shallow geophysics interpretations to hydrogeological site characterization.
Date: March 1, 2000
Creator: Rubin, Yoram; Morrison, Frank & Rector, Jamie
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Collaborative research: Hydrogeological-geophysical methods for subsurface site characterization. 1997 annual progress report

Description: 'In the first year of the project progress has been made in several areas which are central to the project. Development of Joint Hydrogcological-Geophysical Co-Interpretation Procedure A strong effort was invested in developing the concepts and the algorithm of the joint hydrogeological-geophysical co-interpretation approach. The reason for the concerted effort in that direction is the large amount of time the authors expect this task will take before completion, and also by the need to direct the data collection efforts. They are currently testing several ideas for co-interpretation, but they are at a quite advanced stage. They are testing these ideas using synthetic studies as well as some preliminary data that has been collected at the Lawrence Livermore National Lab site. Part of the efforts is in developing methods for estimation of the semi-variograms of the logconductivity based on direct measurements as well as on seimsic velocity measurements as obtained from cross-well tomography. Preliminary tests show that these two sources of data complement each other quite well: the direct measurements supply the medium to small wave number portion of the logconductivity spectra, while a high resolution seismic survey supplies a good coverage of the large wave number part of the spectra. They advanced significantly with formulating their approach for using Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) imaging techniques in shallow subsurface surveys. Synthetic surveys show that GPR maybe very suitable for mapping spatial variations in saturations. They have access to field data and are analyzing it. Some additional issues that were investigated are also listed.'
Date: October 31, 1997
Creator: Rubin, Y.; Morrison, F. & Rector, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Collaborative Research: hydrogeological-geophysical methods for subsurface site characterization. 1998 annual progress report

Description: 'The general purpose is the subsurface characterization of LLNL superfund site. The goal is to get the most accurate map of the hydrogeological parameters, necessary for modeling and designing the cleanup efforts at the site, using well log data and remote sensing geophysical techniques. In the second year of the project progress has been made in several areas: gathering and interpreting Vertical Seismic Profile (VSP) and Electromagnetic (EM) surveys; investigating the impact of various seismic measurements on upscaling of rock physics relations between sediment properties; and developing a new approach to integrate geophysical and hydrological data using state of the art methods to characterize the subsurface lithology. Vertical Seismic Profile data has been gathered from selected wells at the Treatment Facility D (TFD) during April 1996 and April 1998. The most striking finding here is the detection of anomalies related to saturation conditions. Preliminary results have revealed three anomalously low acoustic velocity zones with velocities below 1,000 m/s; this is lower than the natural acoustic velocity in saturated media by pure water (1,500 m/s). These three zones appear to be associated with HSUs 3a, 3b and 5. Velocities below 600 m/s have been revealed in the 3a and 3b HSUs (http://www.ce.Berkeley.edu/{approximately}ezzedine/DOE/paul.html). The authors believe that these anomalies are indicative of partial saturation. This explanation is supported by the water samples taken from pumping stations near the VSP well sites which appears to contain air bubbles. A gas analysis of water samples has not yet been performed. The authors hypothesize that this gas can be either air being sucked-in from the vadose zone above the water table, or from some chemical reaction. As a matter of fact, the natural water table level at this site was around 20 m below ground surface before any large scale pumping began, and had dropped ...
Date: June 1, 1998
Creator: Mavko, G. & Rubin, Y.N.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Combined Extraction of Cesium, Strontium, and Actinides from Alkaline Media : An Extension of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Process Technology

Description: This fundamental research on combined cesium, strontium, and actinide separation from alkaline media by solvent extraction addresses the EM need for more efficient processes for the combined separation of these elements.
Date: June 1, 2002
Creator: Delmau, Latitia H.; Hobbs, David T. & Raymond, Kenneth N.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Combined Extraction of Cesium, Strontium, and Actinides from Alkaline Media : An Extension of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Process Technology

Description: This fundamental research on combined cesium, strontium, and actinide separation from alkaline media by solvent extraction addresses the EM need for more efficient processes for the combined separation of these elements.
Date: June 1, 2003
Creator: Delmau, Laetitia H.; Hobbs, David T. & Raymond, Kenneth N.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Combined Extraction of Cesium, Strontium, and Actinides from Alkaline Media : An Extension of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Process Technology

Description: This fundamental research on combined cesium, strontium, and actinide separation from alkaline media by solvent extraction addresses the EM need for more efficient processes for the combined separation of these elements. The goal of this research is to obtain fundamental information for the development of more efficient processes for the combined separation of cesium, strontium, and transuranic elements from high level waste within the U.S. Department of Energy's (U.S. DOE) complex. These improved processes are targeted primarily for treating the wastes present at the U.S. DOE's Hanford and Savannah River sites. Combined separation of the radionuclides from these wastes would permit disposal of the treated waste as low-level waste, significantly reducing the volume of high level waste. Solvent extraction using the calixarene-based CSSX process has been shown to be a very effective separation method for cesium removal from High Level Waste (HLW) present at the U.S. DOE's Savannah River Site (SRS).
Date: June 1, 2004
Creator: Delmau, Laetitia H.; Hobbs, David T. & Raymond, Kenneth N.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Comprehensive test ban (CTB) reviews

Description: This report provides a discussion, both pro and con, of the merits of a comprehensive test ban treaty. Impacts on cost, technology, verification, peaceful uses of nuclear explosives, scientific and technical personnel, environment, and government policies are detailed.
Date: May 1, 1970
Creator: Landauer, J. K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Controlled-source electromagnetic survey at Soda Lakes geothermal area, Nevada

Description: The EM-60 system, a large-moment frequency-domain electromagnetic loop prospecting system, was operated in the Soda Lakes geothermal area, Nevada. Thirteen stations were occupied at distances ranging from 0.5-3.0 km from two transmitter sites. These yielded four sounding curves--the normalized amplitudes and phases of the vertical and radial magnetic fields as a function of frequency--at each station. In addition, two polarization ellipse parameters, ellipticity and tilt angle, were calculated at each frequency. The data were interpreted by means of a least-squares inversion procedure which fits a layered resistivity model to the data. A three-layer structure is indicated, with a near-surface 20 ohm-m layer of 100-400 m thickness, a middle 2 ohm-m layer of approximately 1 km thickness, and a basement of greater than 10 ohm-m. The models indicate a northwesterly structural strike; the top and middle layers seem to thicken from northeast to southwest. The results agree quite well with previous results of dipole-dipole and magnetotelluric (MT) surveys. The EM-60 survey provided greater depth penetration (1 to 1.5 km) than dipole-dipole, but MT far surpassed both in its depth of exploration. One advantage of EM in this area is its ease and speed of operation. Another advantage, its relative insensitivity to lateral inhomogeneities, is not as pronounced here as it would be in areas of more complex geology.
Date: July 1, 1980
Creator: Stark, M.; Wilt, M.; Haught, J. R. & Goldstein, N.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Conversations about electricity and the future: Findings of an international seminar and lessons from a year of surprises

Description: In January 1990 thirty-two experts from twelve countries convened for a five-day working Seminar on the Berkeley Campus of the University of California to discuss electricity supply and demand. The participants brought with them deep and diverse backgrounds in energy issues. A major concern of the First 1990 Group on Electricity was the potential impact of electricity shortages on the environment, just at a time of growing awareness of environmental deterioration. These concerns extend from local problems to nations, regions and global impacts. Indeed, because of the importance of electricity in our lives, potential electric power shortages already foreseeable in this decade could overwhelm public concern for the environment, unless critical, long-leadtime measures are taken very soon. The First 1990 Group on Electricity's Findings and Conclusions, the thinking that led to them, and the impact of events in the intervening year form the content of this book.
Date: June 1, 1991
Creator: Rossin, A.D. & Fowler, K. (eds.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Cooperative program on DIII-D (FY93); Progress report

Description: This is a proposal to continue support of the authors cooperative research program on DIII-D, under Department of Energy contract DE-FG03-89ER51116. The proposal describes work carried out recently in support of DIII-D data analysis and modeling, with a focus on divertors, edge physics and transport phenomena linking edge and core physics. Proposed work will continue to focus on edge physics, instabilities, the further development of codes to model the plasma, and data analysis in support of related experimental work.
Date: March 1, 1994
Creator: Fowler, T.K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department