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In Nomine Domini

Description: In Nomine Domini is an eighteen-minute composition for two chamber orchestras with two soloists using real-time interactive signal processing techniques. The first chamber orchestra is scored for flute (piccolo), English horn, trumpet in C, trombone, two percussionists (cowbells, wood blocks, tenor drum, suspended cymbal, gongs, tam-tam, temple blocks, tambourine, snare drum, timbales, and bass drum), horn in F (soloist), viola, and string bass. The second chamber orchestra is scored for oboe, clarinet in Bb (bass clarinet in Bb), bassoon, tuba, two percussionists (crotales, two marimbas, vibraphone, chimes, and tom-toms), piano (soloist), violin, and cello. Real-time interactive signal processing techniques are achieved through the use of a stereo multiple-effects signal processor and a personal computer running MIDI interactive software. The work is based upon the four-hundred and seventy-five year old in nomine composition tradition begun by John Taverner in the Benedictus of his Mass Gloria tibi Trinitas (1520) and continued in over one-hundred and fifty Renaissance settings. In Nomine Domini consists of three movements: "Taverner* derived from the Benedictus of the Mass Gloria tibi Trinitas (1520), "Byrd" derived from the Benedictus of William Byrd's Five-voice Mass (1592), and "Tye" derived from Christopher lye's In Nomine XIII "Trust" (1578). In Nomine Domini applies the English art of change ringing and three computer-assisted composition techniques: stochastic processes, fractal applications, and conditional probabilities.
Date: August 1995
Creator: Crowley, Timothy R. (Timothy Robert)
Partner: UNT Libraries

An Interpretive Approach to Two Wind Partitas of Franz Vincent Krommer: Partita in F, Op. 57 (1808) and Partita in E-flat, Op. 79 (1810), A Lecture Recital : Together with Three Recitals of Selected Works of Stravinsky, Hanson, Martin Mailman, Holst and Walton

Description: An interpretive approach to performing two works by Franz Krommer for wind ensemble. Including a short history of Harmoniemusik, with origins, development, and chronology of the instruments and repertoire, the roles of "better-known" composers of Harmoniemusik, and its importance in both general music history and history of the wind band. An account of known biographical detail concerning Franz Krommer, his life, his musical involvement and career in Europe, and his place in music history. An overview of his compositions for wind groups other than the Harmoniemusik, including his symphonic music and concertos. Detailed analyses of the two octet-partitas, Partita in F, Op. 57 and Partita in E-flat, Op. 79, with discussion of thematic, harmonic, melodic, articulation, and formal characteristics illustrated through score examples. Examination of issues for a conductor to consider when approaching a performance of these works such as instrumentation (modern vs. period instruments, selecting 16-foot instrument), taking (or not taking) repeats with respect to form, interpreting articulations, determining metronomic tempos, ensemble balance, and style based on wind music of the Classical period. Also, how this music can (and why it should) be used by wind conductors as both a teaching supplement and a compositional model for pieces from the Classical period. Conclusion includes a call for further research on Krommer and his works.
Date: August 1995
Creator: Mailman, Matthew
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Keyboard Percussion Trios of Toru Takemitsu and Toshi Ichiyanagi, a Lecture Recital, together with Three Recitals of Selected Works of Cahn, Maslanka, Miki, Miyoshi, Ptaszynska, Schultz, Wesley-Smith, and Others

Description: The purpose of this study is to examine the various signatures of compositional style as manifested in the keyboard percussion trios Rain Tree by Toru Takemitsu and Wind Trace by Toshi Ichiyanagi. Significant personal interaction between the aforementioned Japanese composers and American composer John Cage justifies an investigation of his influence on their compositional styles. Toru Takemitsu is currently one of the most prolific Japanese composers. In 1981, Takemitsu composed the percussion trio Rain Tree. Three years later (1984) the Japanese concert pianist Toshi Ichiyanagi composed Wind Trace using Rain Tree's identical instrumentation of marimba, vibraphone, and crotales. Rain Tree and Wind Trace are very similar in compositional style. Formally, both works are single-movement compositions employing rhythmic tension, harmonic dissonance, and visual imagery created by the use of polyrhythms, aleatory, nonfunctional harmony, and extra-musical references. This study investigates the Japanese philosophy of ma and its influence in Rain Tree and Wind Trace. Ma is the natural pause or interval between two or more phenomena occurring continuously. According to Takemitsu, ma is living space, more than actual space. Both compositions utilize space as an essential compositional technique to either connect compartmentalized activity or to complement melodic material. With the utmost respect for nature, Toru Takemitsu and Toshi Ichiyanagi have synthesized elements of Oriental and Occidental music into compositional styles that are unique yet universal. Functioning within both composer's strong personal aesthetics, the affective use of aleatoric and polyrhythmic structures reflect John Cage's influence. Takemitsu's decision to reevaluate the qualities of Japanese traditional music, and to consciously attempt to express the qualities of nature within his music, are attributable to his associations with John Cage. Rain Tree and Wind Trace are virtuosic vehicles of musical expression for which an understanding of the subtle elements within the Eastern and Western art forms is ...
Date: August 1995
Creator: Finnie, Jimmy W. (Jimmy Wayne)
Partner: UNT Libraries

Temporal Distortions: a Composition for Orchestra

Description: Temporal Distortions is 18-20 minutes in length and is written for an orchestra including 2 flutes (2nd flute doubling on piccolo), 2 oboes, 2 Bb clarinets, 2 bassoons, 2 horns, 2 trumpets, 2 trombones, timpani, 3 percussionists playing tri-toms, vibraphone, snare/tenor drum, medium suspended cymbal, Glockenspiel, bass drum, and large tam-tam; and multiple string parts for violin I a & b, violin II a & b, viola a & b, cello and double bass. Temporal Distortions was inspired by the theoretical concept of "wormholes" in space, where matter is warped through distorted passages connecting distant and diverse parts of the universe. The work is in three sections, connected without break. The first section, Space, emerges as a wide, expansive musical area where themes and gestures are freely presented. Gradually, these materials come into phase with one another, building to a climax. A transition follows, leading into the middle section, Wormholes, where the materials are frequently and suddenly transformed into other temporal elements. The third section, Comets, was inspired by the collision of the comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 with the planet Jupiter in July of 1993. Driving, underlying rhythms propel the thematic material through a series of statements which split into more and more substatements. This leads into a turbulent, explosive section and a final wormhole which returns to the opening material. Five basic temporal elements -- sustaining, aligned/non-repeating, aligned/repeating, non-aligned/repeating, and non-aligned/non-repeating -- are derived and demonstrated. Relationships between these elements are examined, and basic transformations are discussed. These elements serve as the basis for a theory of temporal analysis applicable to both metered and non-metered music. Chapter I presents this theory, and Chapter II discusses its application as a compositional method in Temporal Distortions.
Date: August 1995
Creator: Frank, Robert J., 1961-
Partner: UNT Libraries