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Advanced direct coal liquefaction. Quarterly technical progress report No. 1, September-November 1983

Description: Wyoming subbituminous coal was liquefied using three different two-stage process configurations in bench-scale tests. These process configurations differed in the type of fractionated deashing resid being recycled to the individual stages. The objective of these runs was to determine whether, by recycle of specific resid streams to the thermal stage, the second stage catalyst life could be improved without detrimentally affecting distillate yield or hydrogen consumption. The results indicate that the two-stage process configuration consisting of hydrotreating the Light Deashed Resid and direct recycle of heavy Deashed Resid to the thermal stage produced the best results. This process configuration resulted in a distillate yield of 54 wt % (MAF coal basis) and overall coal conversion in the 93 to 95% range, as measured by pyridine-soluble analytical test while operating in a total distillate mode. These results are very encouraging from the lower rank Wyoming subbituminous coal. Among the three two-stage process configurations tested, the particular process configuration of hydrotreating Light Deashed Resid resulted in the least amount of catalyst deactivation. As a part of this research effort, a test procedure for quick evaluation of various resids and catalysts in terms of coke precursors was also developed. This procedure utilizing as-produced oxide-form extrudates of catalyst is able to simulate closely in a batch reactor test the performance of a presulfided and extrudate form of catalyst in a continuous reactor. The CSD unit, being able to not only deash but also fractionate the resid, greatly increased the flexibility of options for coal liquefaction. New process concepts evolved incorporating reside fractionation and selective resid recycle in coal liquefaction. 17 figures, 28 tables.
Date: February 7, 1984
Creator: Paranjape, A.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

ASCOT data from the 1980 field measurement program in the Anderson Creek Valley, California. [ASCOT Program]

Description: With the ASCOT program's initial focus being on the study of transport and dispersion of materials injected in or near nocturnal drainage flows, a series of exploratory field experiments of limited scope were conducted during July 1979 in the Anderson Creek valley of The Geysers geothermal area in northern California. The analyses of the results provided insight into the structure of the drainage flows and permitted the design of a more comprehensive series of experiments that were conducted during September 1980 in the same valley. The experimental plan consisted of five separate and identical experiments. Each experiment included multiple tracer releases that were coordinated with a series of meteorological measurements. The general objectives of these experiments were: evaluate the entire nocturnal drainage cycle-initiation, perpetuation, and breakdown; define the regional scale flows (30 to 50 km range) as well as the flows over the ridges surrounding the Anderson Creek Valley to permit an evaluation of the influence of these flows on the nocturnal drainage flows within the valley; define, at least in a preliminary manner, the effect of surface roughness and forest canopy on the drainage flows; define the temporal and spatial characteristics of the drainage flows within the valley; define the evolution of drainage flows within the lower portions of the valley and subsequent outflow of this air into the Middletown area. This should include a characterization of the three- dimensional structure of this pool and an evaluation of the mechanisms responsible for draining the pool; evaluate the exchange of mass between the nocturnal drainage flows and the over-lying transition layer.
Date: November 7, 1984
Creator: Dickerson, M.H. & Gudiksen, P.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Behavior of carbon-14 in waste packages for spent fuel in a repository in tuff. Revision 1

Description: Analysis of gas from a heated air-filled canister containing a spent fuel assembly before and after rupture of a fuel rod shows that about 1.5 mCi of {sup 14}C from the external surface of the assembly was rapidly oxidized and released as {sup 14}CO{sub 2} in excess oxygen at 275{sup 0}C and 10{sup 4}/sup rad/h. After rupture, an additional 0.3 mCi was released, probably also from the external surface. The total {sup 14}C inventory in the entire 15 x 15 rod assembly including structural hardware is estimated to be 690 mCi. These measurements indicate that account will have to be taken of the time distribution of lifetimes of the canisters, and a broad definition of the "engineered system" may be necessary, in order to meet 10CFR60 requirements with spent fuel in a repository in tuff. 22 refs., 1 tab.
Date: November 7, 1984
Creator: Van Konynenburg, R.A.; Smith, C.F.; Culham, H.W. & Otto, C.H. Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

DT-burning upgrade to MFTF-B

Description: To improve MFTF-B, one must raise the ion energy and the electrostatic confining potential. This requires higher beam energy (200 keV in this case) and, to preserve end-plug adiabaticity and hold higher plasma density in the central cell, a higher level of magnetic field. In the MFTF Upgrade we also want to incorporate the new end plug configuration first invented for the MARS reactor. This new magnet design is compared with the present MFTF-B magnet set. The differences include the addition of a pair of recircularizing coils on the ends to be used in conjunction with the end region pumping and direct converter schemes, the use of a yin-yang pair rather than a baseball-type coil in the transition, and the elimination of the axicell in favor of the simple choke coil. Also, as noted earlier, an axisymmetric mirror cell is imbedded in the central cell.
Date: May 7, 1984
Creator: Thomassen, K.I.; Logan, B.G.; Doggett, J.N. & Coensgen, F.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Electron motion in solenoidal magnetic fields using a first order symplectic integration algorithm

Description: The use of nonsymplectic procedures in particle tracing codes for relativistic electrons leads to errors that can be reduced only at the expense of using very small integration steps. More accurate results are obtained with symplectic transformations for position and momentum. A first-order symplectic integration procedure requires an iterative calculation of the new position coordinates using the old momenta, but the process usually converges in three or four steps. A first-order symplectic algorithm has been coded for cylindrical as well as Cartesian coordinates using the relativistic equations of motion with Hamiltonian variables. The procedure is applied to the steering of a beam of 80-keV electrons by a weak transverse magnetic field superposed on a strong magnetic field in the axial direction. The steering motion is shown to be parallel to the transverse field rather than perpendicular as would be the case without the strong axial field.
Date: May 7, 1984
Creator: Fraser, J.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Estimating and coping with public response to radioactive waste repository siting

Description: The siting and construction of a radioactive waste disposal operation is likely to be controversial in the communities being considered, and at the state and national levels as well. Public response can be conceptualized at two levels: individual, and group or organizational. At the individual level, public response is the behavior of people motivated by their attitudes, knowledge, and perceptions of radioactive waste and its hazards and risks. On the group or organizational level, public response is the organized activity of individuals. Organizations provide the ability to pool resources and talents, set up a division of labor, hire experts, develop a skilled leadership, take legal action, and so on. A broad range of organizations is possible: ad hoc, existing community groups with an added purpose, nationally-recognized organizations, or government offices and agencies. Two cases of response to radioactive waste disposal sites illustrate these sources and kinds of response and lead to indicators to estimate the nature and level of response. Finally, drawing from the theoretical discussion of the sources and levels of public response, on the estimation techniques, and on the examples, specific coping strategies are developed. These strategies take different forms, based on the nature and level of response (either supporting or opposing) to the proposed siting, and the past experience of the community members with similar projects, with other federal requirements, and with citizens' action groups, as well as sources and accuracy of information individuals and groups have. However, all strategies are based on a policy of honesty and straight-forwardness, with a sincere effort on the part of site evaluators and decision-makers to be attentive and responsive to the public's concerns. 10 references.
Date: February 7, 1984
Creator: Payne, B.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Field enhancement of a 12. 5-T magnet using holmium poles

Description: Unlike conventional ferromagnetic materials such as iron and Supermendur, which produce saturation magnetization fields of approximately 2 T, several of the rare-earth elements (holmium, terbium, erbium, gadolinium, and dysprosium) yield saturated fields of nearly 4 T. This property makes these rare-earth metals particularly attractive as flux concentrators for use in superconducting magnets. This report concerns the use of holmium inserts to enhance the peak useful field of the nominally 12.5-T, 5-cm-bore tape magnet manufactured by the Intermagnetics General Corporation (IGC). Nonlinear magnetostatic analysis indicates that this field increases to nearly 16 T with the rare-earth poles inserted within the bore on both sides of the coil's split-plane radial access gap. This paper focuses on computer modeling methods and experimental results.
Date: September 7, 1984
Creator: Hoard, R.W.; Mance, S.C.; Leber, R.L.; Dalder, E.N.; Chaplin, M.R.; Blair, K. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Instrumentation and control system for the AT-2 accelerator test stand

Description: A data-driven subroutine package, written for our accelerator test stand (ATS), is described. This flexible package permits the rapid writing and modifying of data acquisition, control, and analysis programs for the many diverse experiments performed on the ATS. These structurally simple and easy to maintain routines help to control administratively the integrity of the ATS through the use of the database. Our operating experience indicates that the original design goals have been met. We describe the subroutines, database, and our experiences with this system.
Date: May 7, 1984
Creator: Wadlinger, E.A.; Holtkamp, D.B. & Holt, H.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Magnetic fusion: planning for the future

Description: A brief review of international cooperation in the fusion program is given. The author shares his views on the technical prospects and future potential of fusion as a practical energy source. (MOW)
Date: February 7, 1984
Creator: Fowler, T.K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Modeling level structures of odd-odd deformed nuclei

Description: A technique for modeling quasiparticle excitation energies and rotational parameters in odd-odd deformed nuclei has been applied to actinide species where new experimental data have been obtained by use of neutron-capture gamma-ray spectroscopy. The input parameters required for the calculation were derived from empirical data on single-particle excitations in neighboring odd-mass nuclei. Calculated configuration-specific values for the Gallagher-Moszkowski splittings were used. Calculated and experimental level structures for /sup 238/Np, /sup 244/Am, and /sup 250/Bk are compared, as well as those for several nuclei in the rare-earth region. The agreement for the actinide species is excellent, with bandhead energies deviating 22 keV and rotational parameters 5%, on the average. Corresponding average deviations for five rare-earth nuclei are 47 keV and 7%. Several applications of this modeling technique are discussed. 18 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.
Date: September 7, 1984
Creator: Hoff, R.W.; Kern, J.; Piepenbring, R. & Boisson, J.P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

[News Clip: 2010]

Description: B-roll video footage from the KXAS-TV/NBC station in Fort Worth, Texas, to accompany a news story.
Date: December 7, 1984, 5:00 p.m.
Creator: KXAS-TV (Television station : Fort Worth, Tex.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[News Clip: Agent Orange]

Description: Video footage from the KXAS-TV/NBC station in Fort Worth, Texas, to accompany a news story. This story aired at 5 P.M.
Date: May 7, 1984
Creator: KXAS-TV (Television station : Fort Worth, Tex.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections