159 Matching Results

Search Results

Advanced search parameters have been applied.

ABORT GAP CLEANING IN RHIC.

Description: During the RHIC Au-run in 2001 the 200 MHz storage cavity system was used for the first time. The rebucketing procedure caused significant beam debunching in addition to amplifying debunching due to other mechanisms. At the end of a four hour store, debunched beam could account for approximately 30%-40% of the total beam intensity. Some of it will be in the abort gap. In order to minimize the risk of magnet quenching due to uncontrolled beam losses at the time of a beam dump, a combination of a fast transverse kicker and copper collimators were used to clean the abort gap. This report gives an overview of the gap cleaning procedure and the achieved performance.
Date: June 3, 2002
Creator: DREES,A.; AHRENS,L.; III FLILLER,R.; GASSNER,D.; MCINTYRE,G.T.; MICHNOFF,R. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

ACCELERATION OF ELECTRONS WITH THE RACETRACK NON-SCALING FFAG FOR E-RHIC

Description: The future relativistic electron hadron collider: e-RHIC requires acceleration of electrons to 10 GeV. In the case that the super conducting linac is selected for acceleration, an energy recovery scheme is required. We propose to study a possibility of using the non-scaling Fixed-Field Gradient-Accelerator (NS-FFAG) for different energies. The beam will be accelerated by the superconducting linac at the top of the sine function, brought back to the front of the linac by the non-scaling FFAG and repeating this few times until the total energy of 20 GeV is reached. After collisions the beam is brought back by the non-scaling FFAG and decelerated (on the lower RF phase) in the same sequence but in the reverse order. Conventional and non-conventional beam dynamic issues will be discussed, like the transit time matching effect and the time of flight adjustments.
Date: June 25, 2007
Creator: TRBOJEVIC,D.; BLASKIEWICZ, M.; LITVINENKO, V.; PTITSYN, V. & ROSER, T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The AGS synchrotron with four helical magnets

Description: The idea of using two partial helical magnets was applied successfully to the AGS synchrotron to preserve the proton beam polarization. In this paper we explore in details the idea of using four helical magnets placed symmetrically in the AGS ring. The placement of four helical magnets in the AGS ring provides many advantages over the present setup of the AGS which uses two partial helical magnets. First, the symmetric placement of the four helical magnets allows for a better control of the AGS optics with reduced values of the beta functions especially near beam injection, second, the vertical spin direction during beam injection and extraction is closer to vertical, and third, it provides for a larger 'spin tune gap', which allows the vertical and horizontal tunes to be placed, and prevent the horizontal and vertical intrinsic spin resonances of the AGS to occur during the acceleration cycle. Although the same spin gap can be obtained with a single or two partial helices, the required high field strength of a single helix makes its use impractical, and that of the double helix rather difficult. In this paper we will provide results on the spin tune and on the optics of the AGS with four partial helical magnets, and compare these results with the present setup of the AGS that uses two partial helical magnets.
Date: May 20, 2012
Creator: N., Tsoupas; Huang, H.; Roser, T.; MacKay, W.W. & Trbojevic, D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The AGS with four helical magnets

Description: The idea of using multiple partial helical magnets was applied successfully to the AGS synchrotron, to preserve the proton beam polarization. In this paper we explore in details the idea of using four helical magnets placed symmetrically in the AGS ring. This modification provides many advantages over the present setup of the AGS that uses two partial helical magnets. First, it provides a larger 'spin tune gap' for the placement of the vertical betatron tune of the AGS during acceleration, second, the vertical spin direction during the beam injection and extraction is closer to vertical, third, the symmetric placement of the snakes allows for a better control of the AGS optics, and for reduced values of the beta and eta functions, especially near injection, fourth, the optical properties of the helical magnets also favor the placement of the horizontal betatron tune in the 'spin tune gap', thus eliminating the horizontal spin resonances. In this paper we provide results on the spin tune and on the optics of the AGS with four partial helical magnets, and we compare these results with the present setup of the AGS that uses two partial helical magnets.
Date: February 25, 2010
Creator: Tsoupas, N.; Huang, H.; MacKay, W.W.; Roser, T. & Trbojevic, D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Alignment and survey of the elements in RHIC

Description: The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) consists of two rings with cryogenic magnets at a 4.5K operating temperature. Control of positions of the dipole and quadrupole cold masses (iron laminations) and the beam position monitors (BPM`s) during production and installation is presented. The roll of the dipoles is controlled by a combination of rotating coil measurements with the surveying measurements. The center of the quadrupole magnetic field is obtained by direct measurement of the field shape within a colloidal cell placed inside the quadrupoles. Special attention is given to the triplet quadrupole alignment and determination of the field center position.
Date: May 1, 1995
Creator: Trbojevic, D.; Cameron, P. & Ganetis, G.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Alignment of the high beta magnets in the RHIC interaction regions

Description: The betatron functions inside the triplet quadrupoles in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider-RHIC are of the order of 1,500 m, necessitating additional attention in the alignment procedure. On each side of the interaction regions eight cryogenic elements (six quadrupoles and two horizontal bending dipoles) are placed inside large cryostats. The quadrupole magnetic centers are obtained by antenna measurements with an accuracy of {+-} 60 {micro}m. The signals from the antenna were cross calibrated with the colloidal cell measurements of the same magnet. The positions of the fiducials are related to the magnet centers during the antenna measurements. Elements are positioned warm inside the cryostats, with offsets to account for shrinkage during the cool down. The supports at the middle of the two central quadrupoles are fixed, while every other element slides longitudinally inside the cryostat during cool down or warm up.
Date: July 1, 1997
Creator: Trbojevic, D.; Jain, A.; Tepikian, S.; Grandinetti, R.; Ganetis, G.; Wei, J. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Argon and argon-oxygen glow discharge cleaning of the Main Ring beam pipe

Description: This report presents the experimental results from the argon and argon-oxygen gas mixture glow discharge in the Main Ring beam pipe and is a follow-up to the proposal for vacuum improvements of the Main Ring magnets and straight sections and the warm Tevatron straight sections. Glow discharge was used in the experiment in order to clean the vacuum system instead of bakeout which could only be performed with great difficulty or not at all. It is a relatively simple and very effective method. The glow discharge occurs under specific gas pressures (10--120 mTorr) and current flows (10/sup /minus/5/ /minus/ 10/sup /minus/1/ A) through gas excitation and formation of plasma conditions. Deexcitation of the gas molecules produces visible light. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain the glow discharge cleaning process. Ions can sputter adsorbed molecules or atoms at the cathode surface and even produce lattice damage extending several monolayers below the surface. The glow discharge has already been extensively used for vacuum improvements in accelerators. 9 refs.
Date: February 15, 1989
Creator: Trbojevic, D. & Pastore, N.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

BEAM-BASED SEXTUPOLE POLARITY VERIFICATION IN THE RHIC

Description: This article presents a beam-based method to check RHIC arc sextupole polarities using local horizontal orbit three-bumps at injection energy. We use 11 bumps in each arc, each covering two SFs (focusing sextupoles) and one SD (defocusing sextupole). If there are no wrong sextupole polarities, the tune shifts from bump to bump and the tune shift patterns from arc to arc should be similar. Wrong sextupole polarities can be easily identified from mismatched signs or amplitudes of tune shifts from bump to bump and/or from arc to arc. Tune shifts in both planes during this study were tracked with a high-resolution base-band tunemeter (BBQ) system. This method was successfully used to the sextupole polarity check in RHIC Blue and Yellow rings in the RHIC 2006 and 2007 runs.
Date: June 25, 2007
Creator: LUO,Y.; SATOGATA, T.; CAMERON, P.; DELLAPENNA, A. & TRBOJEVIC, D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Beam lifetime and emittance growth in RHIC under normal operating conditions with the hydrogen gas jet, the cluster-jet and pellet targets

Description: The inelastic scattering of the beam and the residual gas molecules in RHIC could represent one of the limitations on the beam life time and emittance growth. This report covers the dominant central nuclear collisions influence on the beam lifetime and transverse emittance growth. The cross sections for the beam-gas electron radiative captures are an order of magnitude smaller. The capture cross sections include the radiative and non-radiative capture, and the capture from the electron-positron pair creation from the 'vacuum capture'.
Date: September 1, 2010
Creator: Trbojevic, D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

BEAM LIFETIME DEPENDENCE ON THE BEAM-GAS INTERACTIONS IN RHIC.

Description: In the Relativistic Heavy ion Collider (RHIC) much larger background signals were occurring at BRAMS, one of the four experiments. This was especially pronounced at the time when vacuum conditions deteriorated due to the beam ionization profile monitor replacements. Recording the beam intensities during the store provided the beam lifetime. Predictions from the beam gas interactions to the above measured values are compared The ionization gauges simultaneously recorded the vacuum pressure data.
Date: June 18, 2001
Creator: TRBOJEVIC,D.; HSUEH,H.C.; MACKAY,W.; DREES,A. & FLILLER,R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

BEAM LIFETIME DEPENDENCE ON THE BEAM-GAS INTERACTIONS IN RHIC.

Description: In the Relativistic Heavy ion Collider (RHIC) much larger background signals were occurring at BRAMS, one of the four experiments. This was especially pronounced at the time when vacuum conditions deteriorated due to the beam ionization profile monitor replacements. Recording the beam intensities during the store provided the beam lifetime. Predictions from the beam gas interactions to the above measured values are compared The ionization gauges simultaneously recorded the vacuum pressure data.
Date: June 18, 2001
Creator: TRBOJEVIC,D.; HSUEH,H.C.; MACKAY,W.; DREES,A. & FLILLER,R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

BEAM PIPE DESORPTION RATE IN RHIC.

Description: In the past, an increase of beam intensity in RHIC has caused several decades of pressure rises in the warm sections during operation. This has been a major factor limiting the RHIC luminosity. About 430 meters of NEG coated beam pipes have been installed in the warm sections to ameliorate this problem. Beam ion induced desorption is one possible cause of pressure rises. A series beam studies in RHIC has been dedicated to estimate the desorption rate of various beam pipes (regular and NEG coated) at various warm sections. Correctors were used to generate local beam losses and consequently local pressure rises. The experimental results are presented and analyzed in this paper.
Date: June 23, 2006
Creator: HUANG, H.; FISCHER, W.; HE, P.; HSEUH, H.C.; IRISO, U.; PTITSYN, V. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Chromatic analysis and possible local chromatic correction in RHIC

Description: In this article we will answer the following questions for the RHIC polarized proton (p-p) and Au-Au run lattices: (1) what are the sources of second order chromaticities? (2) what is the dependence of second order chromaticity on the on-momentum {beta}-beat? (3) what is the dependence of second order chromaticity on {beta}* at IP6 and IP8? To answer these questions, we use the perturbation theory to numerically calculate the contributions of each quadrupole and sextupole to the first, second, and third order chromaticities. Possible local methods to reduce chromatic effects in RHIC ring are shortly discussed.
Date: March 28, 2011
Creator: Luo, Y.; Fischer, W.; Gu, X. & Trbojevic, D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Coherent electron cooling demonstration experiment

Description: Coherent electron cooling (CEC) has a potential to significantly boost luminosity of high-energy, high-intensity hadron-hadron and electron-hadron colliders. In a CEC system, a hadron beam interacts with a cooling electron beam. A perturbation of the electron density caused by ions is amplified and fed back to the ions to reduce the energy spread and the emittance of the ion beam. To demonstrate the feasibility of CEC we propose a proof-of-principle experiment at RHIC using SRF linac. In this paper, we describe the setup for CeC installed into one of RHIC's interaction regions. We present results of analytical estimates and results of initial simulations of cooling a gold-ion beam at 40 GeV/u energy via CeC. We plan to complete the program in five years. During first two years we will build coherent electron cooler in IP2 of RHIC. In parallel we will develop complete package of computer simulation tools for the start-to-end simulation predicting exact performance of a CeC. The later activity will be the core of Tech X involvement into the project. We will use these tools to predict the performance of our CeC device. The experimental demonstration of the CeC will be undertaken in years three to five of the project. The goal of this experiment is to demonstrate the cooling of ion beam and to compare its measured performance with predictions made by us prior to the experiments.
Date: September 4, 2011
Creator: Litvinenko, V.N.; Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Brutus, J.C.; Fedotov, A.; Hao, Y. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

COMMISSIONING OF RHIC AT 100 GEV / NUCLEON.

Description: This report describes commissioning of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) for 100 GeV/nucleon collisions at designed luminosity. To achieve these goals new systems had to be commissioned: Gamma-t transition crossing jump quadrupoles, rebucketing with the new RF storage cavities, phase lock loop feedback, betatron and crystal collimation, beta squeeze along the ramp, Siberian snake magnets for the proton polarization run, AC dipole system chromaticity measurements along the acceleration ramp, orbit correction, new ramp management system, upgraded sequencer, new data instrumentation and logger acquisition system etc.
Date: June 2, 2002
Creator: TRBOJEVIC,D.; AHRENS,L.; BLASKIEWICZ,M.; BRENNAN,J.M.; BAI,M.; CAMERON,P. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

COMMISSIONING OF THE RELATIVISTIC HEAVY ION COLLIDER.

Description: This report describes in detail steps performed in bringing the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) from the commissioning into the operational stage when collisions between 60 bunches of fully striped gold ions, were routinely provided. Corrections of the few power supplies connections by the beam measurements are described. Beam lifetime improvements at injection, along the acceleration are shown. The beam diagnostic results; like Schottky detector, beam profile monitor, beam position monitors, tune meter and others, are shown [1].
Date: June 18, 2001
Creator: TRBOJEVIC,D.; AHRENS,L.; BLASKIEWICZ,M.; BRENNAN,M.; BAI,M.; CAMERON,P. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

COMPARISON BETWEEN THE PREDICTIONS AND MEASUREMENTS FOR THE BEAM GAS INTERACTIONS DURING THE LAST GOLD AND PROTON RUNS IN RHIC.

Description: The last gold-gold and polarized proton-proton collision runs were performed at energies of 100 GeV/nucleon. The beam gas interactions in RHIC are very important for the beam lifetime in RHIC. In this report the lifetime predicted by pressure data differences between the beams ON and beams OFF, at the energies of 100 GeV/nucleon. are compared to the predictions for the beam gas interaction and beam lifetimes.
Date: June 2, 2002
Creator: TRBOJEVIC,D.; HSEUH,H.C.; FISCHER,W.; ZHANG,S.Y. & MACKAY,W.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Comparison of accelerator technologies for use in ADSS

Description: Accelerator Driven Subcritical (ADS) fission is an interesting candidate basis for nuclear waste transmutation and for nuclear power generation. ADS can use either thorium or depleted uranium as fuel, operate below criticality, and consume rather than produce long-lived actinides. A case study with a hypothetical, but realistic nuclear core configuration is used to evaluate the performance requirements of the driver proton accelerator in terms of beam energy, beam current, duty factor, beam distribution delivered to the fission core, reliability, and capital and operating cost. Comparison between a CW IC and that of a SRF proton linac is evaluated. Future accelerator R&D required to improve each candidate accelerator design is discussed. ADS fission has interesting potential for electric power generation and also for destruction of long-lived actinide waste produced by conventional critical reactors. ADS systems offer several interesting advantages in comparison to critical reactors: (1) ADS provides greater flexibility for the composition and placement of fissile, fertile, or fission product waste within the core, and require less enrichment of fissile content; (2) The core can be operated with a reactivity k{sub eff} that cannot reach criticality by any failure mode; (3) When the beam is shut off fission ceases in the core; (4) Coupling the fast neutron spectrum of the spallation drive to fast core neutronics offers a basis for more complete burning of long-lived actinides; and (5) ADS designs can provide sufficient thermal mass that meltdown cannot occur from radioactive heat after fission is stopped. In order to drive a {approx}GW{sub e} fission core a CW proton beam of >700 MeV and {approx}15 MW beam power is required. A previous study of the accelerator performance required for ADS systems concluded that present accelerator performance is approaching those requirements, but accelerator system cost and reliability remain particular concerns. The obvious candidates ...
Date: March 28, 2011
Creator: Weng, W.T.; Ludewig, H.; Raparia, D.; Trbojevic, D.; Todosow, M.; McIntyre, P. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department