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Africa Command: U.S. Strategic Interests and the Role of the U.S. Military in Africa

Description: This report provides a broad overview of U.S. strategic interests in Africa and the role of U.S. military efforts on the continent as they pertain to the creation of U.S. Africa Command (AFRICOM). A discussion of AFRICOM's mission, its coordination with other government agencies, and its basing and manpower requirements is included.
Date: August 22, 2008
Creator: Ploch, Lauren
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Africa Command: U.S. Strategic Interests and the Role of the U.S. Military in Africa

Description: This report provides a broad overview of U.S. strategic interests in Africa and the role of U.S. military efforts on the continent as they pertain to the creation of AFRICOM. Although the command is still in the early stages of its development, a discussion of AFRICOM’s mission, its coordination with other government agencies, and its basing and manpower requirements is included.
Date: March 10, 2008
Creator: Ploch, Lauren
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Course of Action Analysis within an Effects-Based Operational Context

Description: This article summarizes information related to the automated course of action (COA) development effort. The information contained in this document puts the COA effort into an operational perspective that addresses command and control theory, as well as touching on the military planning concept known as effects-based operations. The sections relating to the COA effort detail the rationale behind the functional models developed and identify technologies that could support the process functions. The functional models include a section related to adversarial modeling, which adds a dynamic to the COA process that is missing in current combat simulations. The information contained in this article lays the foundation for building a unique analytic capability.
Date: November 1, 2001
Creator: SENGLAUB, MICHAEL E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Destruction of a Society: A Qualitative Examination of the Use of Rape as a Military Tool

Description: This thesis explores the conditions under which mass rapes are more likely to be incorporated into the strategy of military or paramilitary groups during periods of conflict. I examine three societies, Rwanda , the former Yugoslavia , and Cambodia in a comparative analysis. To determine what characteristics make societies more likely to engage in rape as a military tool, I look at the status of women in the society, the religious cultures, the degree of female integration into the military institutions, the cause of the conflicts, the history of the conflict, and finally, the status of minority ethnic groups in each of these societies.
Access: This item is restricted to UNT Community Members. Login required if off-campus.
Date: December 2004
Creator: Finley, Briana Noelle
Partner: UNT Libraries

A development environment for operational concepts and systems engineering analysis.

Description: The work reported in this document involves a development effort to provide combat commanders and systems engineers with a capability to explore and optimize system concepts that include operational concepts as part of the design effort. An infrastructure and analytic framework has been designed and partially developed that meets a gap in systems engineering design for combat related complex systems. The system consists of three major components: The first component consists of a design environment that permits the combat commander to perform 'what-if' types of analyses in which parts of a course of action (COA) can be automated by generic system constructs. The second component consists of suites of optimization tools designed to integrate into the analytical architecture to explore the massive design space of an integrated design and operational space. These optimization tools have been selected for their utility in requirements development and operational concept development. The third component involves the design of a modeling paradigm for the complex system that takes advantage of functional definitions and the coupled state space representations, generic measures of effectiveness and performance, and a number of modeling constructs to maximize the efficiency of computer simulations. The system architecture has been developed to allow for a future extension in which the operational concept development aspects can be performed in a co-evolutionary process to ensure the most robust designs may be gleaned from the design space(s).
Date: March 1, 2004
Creator: Raybourn, Elaine Marie & Senglaub, Michael E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Emerging Technologies and MOUT

Description: Operating in a potentially hostile city is every soldier's nightmare. The staggering complexity of the urban environment means that deadly threats--or non-combatants-may lurk behind every corner, doorway, or window. Urban operations present an almost unparalleled challenge to the modern professional military. The complexity of urban operations is further amplified by the diversity of missions that the military will be called upon to conduct in urban terrain. Peace-making and peace-keeping missions, urban raids to seize airports or WMD sites or to rescue hostages, and extended urban combat operations all present different sorts of challenges for planners and troops on the ground. Technology almost never serves as a magic bullet, and past predictions of technological miracles pile high on the ash heap of history. At the same time, it is a vital element of planning in the modern age to consider and, if possible, take advantage of emerging technologies. We believe that technologies can assist military operations in urbanized terrain (MOUT) in three primary areas, which are discussed.
Date: November 15, 2000
Creator: YONAS,GEROLD & MOY,TIMOTHY DAVID
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Extended defense systems :I. adversary-defender modeling grammar for vulnerability analysis and threat assessment.

Description: Vulnerability analysis and threat assessment require systematic treatments of adversary and defender characteristics. This work addresses the need for a formal grammar for the modeling and analysis of adversary and defender engagements of interest to the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). Analytical methods treating both linguistic and numerical information should ensure that neither aspect has disproportionate influence on assessment outcomes. The adversary-defender modeling (ADM) grammar employs classical set theory and notation. It is designed to incorporate contributions from subject matter experts in all relevant disciplines, without bias. The Attack Scenario Space U{sub S} is the set universe of all scenarios possible under physical laws. An attack scenario is a postulated event consisting of the active engagement of at least one adversary with at least one defended target. Target Information Space I{sub S} is the universe of information about targets and defenders. Adversary and defender groups are described by their respective Character super-sets, (A){sub P} and (D){sub F}. Each super-set contains six elements: Objectives, Knowledge, Veracity, Plans, Resources, and Skills. The Objectives are the desired end-state outcomes. Knowledge is comprised of empirical and theoretical a priori knowledge and emergent knowledge (learned during an attack), while Veracity is the correspondence of Knowledge with fact or outcome. Plans are ordered activity-task sequences (tuples) with logical contingencies. Resources are the a priori and opportunistic physical assets and intangible attributes applied to the execution of associated Plans elements. Skills for both adversary and defender include the assumed general and task competencies for the associated plan set, the realized value of competence in execution or exercise, and the opponent's planning assumption of the task competence.
Date: March 1, 2006
Creator: Merkle, Peter Benedict
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Glider communications and controls for the sea sentry mission.

Description: This report describes a system level study on the use of a swarm of sea gliders to detect, confirm and kill littoral submarine threats. The report begins with a description of the problem and derives the probability of detecting a constant speed threat without networking. It was concluded that glider motion does little to improve this probability unless the speed of a glider is greater than the speed of the threat. Therefore, before detection, the optimal character for a swarm of gliders is simply to lie in wait for the detection of a threat. The report proceeds by describing the effect of noise on the localization of a threat once initial detection is achieved. This noise is estimated as a function of threat location relative to the glider and is temporally reduced through the use of an information or Kalman filtering. In the next section, the swarm probability of confirming and killing a threat is formulated. Results are compared to a collection of stationary sensors. These results show that once a glider has the ability to move faster than the threat, the performance of the swarm is equal to the performance of a stationary swarm of gliders with confirmation and kill ranges equal to detection range. Moreover, at glider speeds greater than the speed of the threat, swarm performance becomes a weak function of speed. At these speeds swarm performance is dominated by detection range. Therefore, to future enhance swarm performance or to reduce the number of gliders required for a given performance, detection range must be increased. Communications latency is also examined. It was found that relatively large communication delays did little to change swarm performance. Thus gliders may come to the surface and use SATCOMS to effectively communicate in this application.
Date: March 1, 2005
Creator: Feddema, John Todd & Dohner, Jeffrey Lynn
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Military airborne and maritime application for cooperative behaviors.

Description: As part of DARPA's Software for Distributed Robotics Program within the Information Processing Technologies Office (IPTO), Sandia National Laboratories was tasked with identifying military airborne and maritime missions that require cooperative behaviors as well as identifying generic collective behaviors and performance metrics for these missions. This report documents this study. A prioritized list of general military missions applicable to land, air, and sea has been identified. From the top eight missions, nine generic reusable cooperative behaviors have been defined. A common mathematical framework for cooperative controls has been developed and applied to several of the behaviors. The framework is based on optimization principles and has provably convergent properties. A three-step optimization process is used to develop the decentralized control law that minimizes the behavior's performance index. A connective stability analysis is then performed to determine constraints on the communication sample period and the local control gains. Finally, the communication sample period for four different network protocols is evaluated based on the network graph, which changes throughout the task. Using this mathematical framework, two metrics for evaluating these behaviors are defined. The first metric is the residual error in the global performance index that is used to create the behavior. The second metric is communication sample period between robots, which affects the overall time required for the behavior to reach its goal state.
Date: September 1, 2004
Creator: Feddema, John Todd; Byrne, Raymond Harry & Robinett, Rush D. III
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

National Security Strategy: Legislative Mandates, Execution to Date, and Considerations for Congress

Description: This report reviews current legislative mandates for security strategic documents, assesses the recent history of execution, describes strategic documents in related fields for comparison, presents considerations that may be useful in assessing current requirements and execution, and notes several current proposals for changes to legislative requirements.
Date: September 23, 2008
Creator: Dale, Catherine
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

National Security Strategy: Legislative Mandates, Execution to Date, and Considerations for Congress

Description: This report reviews current legislative mandates for security strategic documents, assesses the recent history of execution, describes strategic documents in related fields for comparison, presents considerations that may be useful in assessing current requirements and execution, and notes several current proposals for changes to legislative requirements.
Date: May 28, 2008
Creator: Dale, Catherine
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

National Security Strategy: Legislative Mandates, Execution to Date, and Considerations for Congress

Description: This report reviews the current legislative mandates for key security strategic documents, assesses the recent history of execution, describes strategic documents in related fields for comparison, presents a series of considerations that may be useful in assessing current requirements and execution, and notes several major proposals for change.
Date: July 28, 2008
Creator: Dale, Catherine
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Nuclear Weapons in U.S. National Security Policy: Past, Present, and Prospects

Description: This report highlights the differences between the construct of tailored deterrence and the more general concept of strategic deterrence that guided U.S. nuclear policy during the Cold War. It then identifies a number of issues that Congress might address when it reviews these differences, including the question of whether detailed and tailored attack plans are more likely to enhance deterrence or more likely to lead to the early use of nuclear weapons, and the question of whether tailored deterrence provides any guidance about the future size and structure of U.S. nuclear forces.
Date: December 30, 2008
Creator: Woolf, Amy F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Science and Technology Review January/February 2000

Description: The contents of this Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory newsletter includes the following: (1) The Laboratory in the News; (2) Commentary by Wayne Shotts--Tapping the Full Power of Conflict Simulation; (3) Simulating Warfare Is No Video Game--A new Laboratory conflict simulation program was put to a major test in a San Francisco Bay Area exercise; (4) Supernova Hydrodynamics Up Close--Despite vast differences in scale, supernovas and high-energy-density laser experiments have more in common than might be imagined; (5) Research Highlights--Agile Manufacturing: Gearing Up to Meet Demand; and Bringing Hypersonic Flight Down to Earth; (6) Patents and Awards; and (7) Abstracts.
Date: January 1, 2000
Creator: De Pruneda, J H
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

SPACE BASED INTERCEPTOR SCALING

Description: Space Based Interceptor (SBI) have ranges that are adequate to address rogue ICBMs. They are not overly sensitive to 30-60 s delay times. Current technologies would support boost phase intercept with about 150 interceptors. Higher acceleration and velocity could reduce than number by about a factor of 3 at the cost of heavier and more expensive Kinetic Kill Vehicles (KKVs). 6g SBI would reduce optimal constellation costs by about 35%; 8g SBI would reduce them another 20%. Interceptor ranges fall rapidly with theater missile range. Constellations increase significantly for ranges under 3,000 km, even with advanced interceptor technology. For distributed launches, these estimates recover earlier strategic scalings, which demonstrate the improved absentee ratio for larger or multiple launch areas. Constellations increase with the number of missiles and the number of interceptors launched at each. The economic estimates above suggest that two SBI per missile with a modest midcourse underlay is appropriate. The SBI KKV technology would appear to be common for space- and surface-based boost phase systems, and could have synergisms with improved midcourse intercept and discrimination systems. While advanced technology could be helpful in reducing costs, particularly for short range theater missiles, current technology appears adequate for pressing rogue ICBM, accidental, and unauthorized launches.
Date: February 1, 2001
Creator: CANAVAN, G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

VARIATION OF STRIKE INCENTIVES IN DEEP REDUCTIONS

Description: This note studies the sensitivity of strike incentives to deep offensive force reductions using exchange, cost, and game theoretic decision models derived and discussed in companion reports. As forces fall, weapon allocations shift from military to high value targets, with the shift being half complete at about 1,000 weapons. By 500 weapons, the first and second strikes are almost totally on high value. The dominant cost for striking first is that of damage to one's high value, which is near total absent other constraints, and hence proportional to preferences for survival of high value. Changes in military costs are largely offsetting, so total first strike costs change little. The resulting costs at decision nodes are well above the costs of inaction, so the preferred course is inaction for all offensive reductions studied. As the dominant cost for striking first is proportional to the preference for survival of high value. There is a wide gap between the first strike cost and that of inaction for the parameters studied here. These conclusions should be insensitive to significant reductions in the preference for survival of high value, which is the most sensitive parameter.
Date: August 1, 2001
Creator: CANAVAN, G.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

VARIATION OF STRIKE INCENTIVES WITH DAMAGE PREFERENCES

Description: For START III level forces, strike allocations and magnitudes vary little with L, but first strike costs vary directly with L, which means that for K reflecting a preference for the survival of high value targets over their destruction and a preference for high value over military targets, the costs of action are far greater than those of inaction for a wide range of values of damage preference L. Thus, if both sides have much greater preferences for the survival of their high value targets than for military targets or destruction, they do not see a net incentive to strike, and crises are terminated by inaction. Recent decades suggest strong preferences for the survival of high value and that this has contributed to the lack of direct conflict during that period.
Date: August 1, 2001
Creator: Canavan, G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

War in Afghanistan: Strategy, Military Operations, and Issues for Congress

Description: The character of the war in Afghanistan evolved from a violent struggle against al Qaeda and its Taliban supporters to a multi-faceted counterinsurgency (COIN) effort. This report provides an examination of the war's background, context, and early execution; an analytical discussion of the COIN war to date, including strategy, organization, participation, and key facets of the effort including population security, advising the Afghan National Security Forces (ANSF), counter-narcotics, reconciliation, community outreach, and civil-military coordination; and an analysis of major strategic and operational issues and options that the 111th Congress may opt to consider.
Date: December 3, 2009
Creator: Bowman, Steve & Dale, Catherine
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The War on Terrorism and What We Can Learn from our War with Fire

Description: The highly leveraged, asymmetric attacks of September 11th have launched the nation on a vast ''War on Terrorism''. Now that our vulnerabilities and the enemies' objectives and determination have been demonstrated, we find ourselves rapidly immersed in a huge, complex problem that is virtually devoid of true understanding while being swamped with resources and proposed technologies for solutions. How do we win this war? How do we make sure that we are making the proper investments? What things or freedoms or rights do we have to give up to win? Where do we even start? In analyzing this problem, many similarities to mankind's battle with uncontrolled fire and the threat it presented to society were noted. Major fires throughout history have destroyed whole cities and caused massive loss of life and property. Solutions were devised that have gradually, over several hundred years, reduced this threat to a level that allows us to co-exist with the threat of fire by applying constant vigilance and investments in fire protection, but without living in constant fear and dread from fire. We have created a multi-pronged approach to fire protection that involves both government and individuals in the prevention, mitigation, and response to fires. Fire protection has become a virtually unnoticed constant in our daily lives; we will have to do the same for terrorism. This paper discusses the history of fire protection and draws analogies to our War on Terrorism. We have, as a society, tackled and successfully conquered a problem as big as terrorism. From this battle, we can learn and take comfort.
Date: July 1, 2002
Creator: WHITLEY, JOHN B. & YONAS, GEROLD
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department