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Addressing questions about including environmental effects in the DMSO HLA

Description: The Defense Modeling and Simulation Office (DMSO) is developing a High Level Architecture (HLA) to support the DOD Modeling and Simulation (M and S) community. Many, if not all, of the simulations involve the environment in some fashion. In some applications, the simulation takes place in an acknowledged environment without any environmental functionality being taken into account. The Joint Training Federation Prototype (JTFp) is one of several prototype efforts that have been created to provide a test of the DMSO HLA. In addition to addressing the applicability of the HLA to a training community, the JTFp is also one of two prototype efforts that is explicitly including environmental effects in their simulation effort. These two prototyping efforts are examining the issues associated with the inclusion of the environment in an HLA federation. In deciding whether or not to include an environmental federation in the JTFp effort, a number of questions have been raised about the environment and the HLA. These questions have raised the issue of incompatibility between the environment and the HLA and also shown that there is something unique about including the environment in simulations. The purpose of this White Paper, which was developed with inputs from the National Air and Space [Warfare] Model Program among others, is to address the various questions that have been posed about including environmental effects in an HLA simulation.
Date: October 1, 1996
Creator: Hummel, J.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Advanced information science and object-oriented technology for information management applications

Description: The role of the military has been undergoing rapid change since the fall of the Berlin Wall. The kinds of missions the US military has been asked to participate in have often fallen into the category of {open_quotes}Military Operations Other Than War{close_quotes} and those involving military responses have been more of a surgical nature directed against different kinds of threats, like rogue states or in response to terrorist actions. As a result, the requirements on the military planner and analyst have also had to change dramatically. For example, preparing response options now requires rapid turnaround and a highly flexible simulation capability. This in turn requires that the planner or analyst have access to sophisticated information science and simulation technologies. In this paper, we shall discuss how advanced information science and object-oriented technologies can be used in advanced information management applications. We shall also discuss how these technologies and tools can be applied to DoD applications by presenting examples with a system developed at Argonne, the Dynamic Information Architecture System (DIAS). DIAS has been developed to exploit advanced information science and simulation technologies to provide tools for future planners and analysts.
Date: October 1, 1996
Creator: Hummel, J.R. & Swietlik, C.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The application of cooperative monitoring techniques to a conceptual limited deployment zone in the Korean peninsula

Description: The Korean peninsula is the site of a tense military confrontation. Relations between North and South Korea improved during the early 1990`s but the process is now frozen. Confidence building measures, particularly military ones, that address the security needs of both countries would decrease the danger of conflict and help create an environment for direct negotiations. The Korean Institute for Defense Analysis (KIDA) analyzed current security conditions and options. Their scenario includes a conceptual agreement to establish Limited Force Deployment Zones (LDZ) along the current demilitarized zone (DMZ) to increase mutual security. The Cooperative Monitoring Center (CMC) of Sandia National Laboratories, in collaboration with KIDA, developed a strategy, with examples, for cooperatively monitoring the agreement. A cooperative monitoring regime requires consideration of the agreement`s terms, the geographic, logistic, military, and political factors of the Korean environment, and the capability of technology to monitor the terms. This paper assesses the applicability of cooperative monitoring to Korea, describes the monitoring strategy for the Korean enhanced DMZ scenario, and describes the applicable technologies and procedures.
Date: October 1, 1996
Creator: Vannoni, M. & Duggan, R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

CMS Distribution Subsystem User`s Guide. Software: Version 1.2

Description: Historically, tactical mission planning systems have been the primary clients of CMS data. CDPS is composed of two subsystems, the CMS Preprocessing Subsystem (CPS) and the CMS Distribution Subsystem (CDS). This guide describes the operation of CDS. References and other resources used for the preparation of this guide are listed. CDS is responsible for the management of archived CMS data, the management of production orders and the generation of theater databases. The CDS system was developed for use on a workstation running Ultrix 4.2, the X Window System Version X11R4, and Motif Version 1.1. CDS is organized into seven major functional groups: CDS Executive, Manage Processed Data, Display CMS Data, Manage Production Orders, Build Theater Databases, Administration Tools, and System Utilities.
Date: October 1, 1993
Creator: Gash, J. D.; Greitzer, F. L.; Hatfield, L. D.; Portwood, M. H. & Turney, C. R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Control of entity interactions in a hierarchical variable resolution simulation

Description: There has long been interest in variable resolution modeling to support military analysis for a broad range of interest areas. Despite the ever-present desire for models of greater fidelity at the expense of analysis and computation resources, models of moderate to low fidelity are still required at many levels of decision-making. Problems can arise due to the issue of consistency among the family of models used for analysis. To address this and other problems, models of variable resolution have been suggested. However, such variable resolution architectures inherently carry their own set of issues which must be resolved in order to be useful. First, what are the structural requirements for a variable resolution model; and second, how are interactions between entities governed, especially when the entities have different resolutions? This paper addresses these issues and discusses key mechanisms needed to develop a variable resolution combat simulation that meets several core requirements for such models: seamless aggregation/disaggregation, appropriate interactions between entities of differing resolution, and control of the aggregation/disaggregation process.
Date: October 1, 1997
Creator: Powell, D.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Environmental representation and the role of clouds in studies and analysis models

Description: The Joint Analysis community is currently making significant improvements and enhancements to its suite of modeling tools used to support studies and analyses for Joint applications. This effort is being performed under the Joint Analytic Model Improvement Program (JAMIP) that began in 1995. One part of the JAMIP effort is the development of the Joint Warfare System (JWARS). JWARS will be a state of the art closed-form, constructive simulation of multisided, joint warefare for analysis. The environment will be a significant factor in future warefare analysis and so JWARS will include an authoritative environmental representation that can be represented at variable spatial and temporal scales. Argonne`s Dynamic Environmental Effects Model (DEEM) was used to provide the environmental representation for the JWARS prototype effort. In this paper we will present an overview of JWARS and describe how the environment and environmental effects are being represented in JWARS. Specific emphasis will be given on how clouds are included in the JWARS environment and the impacts they have on the warfighting functionality included in JWARS.
Date: October 1, 1997
Creator: Hummel, J.R. & Campbell, A.P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Quotas for CFE Treaty declared site inspections for baseline validation

Description: The CFE Treaty will provide for limits on NATO and WTO forces, particularly tanks, armored personnel carriers, artillery, and helicopters. In addition to the overall limits on TLEs in the ATTU zone, there are expected to be secondary limits on single country forces, limits on forces based in foreign nations, and geographic sublimits. To help validate WTO declarations of baseline forces, the treaty may provide for on-site inspections by NATO of declared WTO basing facilities. One important unresolved issue concerning baseline declared-site OSIs is the quota of such inspections allowed each country. This report presents a decision analysis and evaluation in support of recommendations for resolving this and related issues. It also indentifies key policy decisions that impact the determination of the number of declared-site OSIs. These decisions are: Desired probabilities of detecting a violation and of falsely accusing WTO; Trade-off between improved verification and the intrusiveness of additional OSIs; Force strength constituting a militarily significant violation; and Degree of coordination with and reliance on inspections by NATO allies. 10 figs.
Date: October 2, 1990
Creator: Strait, R.S. & Sicherman, A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department