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D-0 North End Cap Calorimeter Cold Test Results

Description: The North endcap calorimeter vessel was recieved on July 1, 1990. A cooldown of the pressure vessel with liquid nitrogen was performed on July 10-11 to check the vessel's integrity. With the pressure vessel cold, the insulating vacuum was monitored for leaks. Through out the testing, the insulating vacuum remained good and the vessel passed the test. The cold test was carried out per the procedures of D-Zero engineering note 3740.220-EN-250. The test was very similar to the cold test performed on the Central Calorimeter in October of 1987. Reference D-Zero engineering notes 3740.210-EN-122, 3740.000-EN107, and 3740.210-EN-110 for information about the CC cold test. The insulating vacuum space was pumped on while equipment was being connected to the pressure vessel. Two hours after starting to pump with the blower the vacuum space pressure was at about 210 microns. Pumping on the vacuum space for the next 15 hours showed no progress and a leak detector was connected to the pumping line. A leak check showed a leak in a thermocouple feedthru on the vacuum space relief plate. After fixing the leak, the pressure dropped to 16 microns in less than one hour. A rate of rise test was performed starting at a pressure of 13 microns. The pressure rose to 39 microns within 8 minutes and then only rose to 43 microns in 2.5 hours (1.6 microns/hour). After all connections were made to the pressure vessel, a vacuum pump with an estimated effective pumping speed of about 70 scfm was valved on. The lowest pressure achieved after 2 days of pumping was 80 microns. Valving out the pump for 30 minutes resulted in a 5 micron per minute rate of rise. The rate of rise was considered acceptable since there were known leak paths through the bolts of the signal ...
Date: August 2, 1990
Creator: Michael, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

241-SY modular exhauster pad analysis

Description: The purpose of this document is to show the analytical results which were reached in analyzing the new 241-SY modular exhauster concrete pad and retaining wall. The analysis covers wind loading (80 mph), an equivalent static load due to a seismic event, and from those two results, a determination of the pad thickness and the location and size of reinforcement bar was made. The analysis of the exhauster assembly and sampling cabinet evaluated overturning of the assemblies as a whole. An analysis was then performed for the bolting requirements for these two assemblies. The reason why this was broken up into components was to determine if the individual components could take the load exerted by the workset case loading condition, whether it be wind or seismic. The retaining wall that will be located near the new concrete pad was also analyzed. The retaining wall was evaluated to determine the area of reinforcement required, the location of reinforcement, as well as the mass and configuration of the wall to prevent overturning or sliding. The wall was considered Non-Safety Class 4. Additional piping was required to tie-in the new exhauster to the existing primary ventilation ductwork. The design for the tie-in includes two butterfly valves, a tee fitting, elbows, flanges, straight pipe sections, and two new pipe supports to accommodate the additional weight. The valves will enable the new and existing exhausters to be isolated independently. The ductwork, couplings, and supports were analyzed for structural adequacy given Safety Class 2 loads.
Date: November 16, 1994
Creator: Kriskovich, J. R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

242-A Evaporator Condensate Tank (TK-C-100) tie down evaluation

Description: The existing Condensate Tank (TK-C-100) in the 242-A Evaporator building is not anchored to the floor slab. This tank is a Safety Class 3 sitting in a Safety Class 2 building. The tank needed to be evaluated to withstand the seismic loads. Anchor bolts have been designed to hold the tank during the seismic event.
Date: January 23, 1995
Creator: Hundal, T. S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

242-A Evaporator ion exchange column (IX-D-1) tie down evaluation

Description: The existing ion exchange column in the 242-A evaporator building is not anchored to the floor slab. This equipment is a Safety Class 3 sitting in a Safety Class 2 building. The column needed to be evaluated to withstand the seismic loads. Anchor bolts have been designed to hold the column during the seismic event.
Date: January 23, 1995
Creator: Hundal, T. S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Accelerated Aging of Polymer Composite Bridge Materials

Description: Accelerated aging research on samples of composite material and candidate ultraviolet (UV) protective coatings is determining the effects of six environmental factors on material durability. Candidate fastener materials are being evaluated to determine corrosion rates and crevice corrosion effects at load-bearing joints. This work supports field testing of a 30-ft long, 18-ft wide polymer matrix composite (PMC) bridge at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Durability results and sensor data from tests with live loads provide information required for determining the cost/benefit measures to use in life-cycle planning, determining a maintenance strategy, establishing applicable inspection techniques, and establishing guidelines, standards, and acceptance criteria for PMC bridges for use in the transportation infrastructure.
Date: March 1, 1999
Creator: Rodriguez, J. G.; Blackwood, L. G.; Torres, L. L.; Carlson, N. M. & Yoder, T. S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Accelerated Aging of Polymer Composite Bridge Materials

Description: Accelerated aging research on samples of composite material and candidate ultraviolet (UV) protective coatings is determining the effects of six environmental factors on material durability. Candidate fastener materials are being evaluated to determine corrosion rates and crevice corrosion effects at load-bearing joints. This work supports field testing of a 30-ft long, 18-ft wide polymer matrix composite (PMC) bridge at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Durability results and sensor data from tests with live loads provide information required for determining the cost/benefit measures to use in life-cycle planning, determining a maintenance strategy, establishing applicable inspection techniques, and establishing guidelines, standards, and acceptance criteria for PMC bridges for use in the transportation infrastructure.
Date: March 1, 1999
Creator: Carlson, Nancy Margaret; Blackwood, Larry Gene; Torres, Lucinda Laine; Rodriguez, Julio Gallardo & Yoder, Timothy Scott
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Acceptance criteria for heat exchanger head staybolts

Description: Each of the six primary coolant loop systems of the Savannah River Site production reactors contains two parallel single-pass heat exchangers to transfer heat from the primary coolant (D{sub 2}O) to the secondary cooling water (H{sub 2}O). The configuration of the heat exchangers includes a plenary space defined by the heat exchanger tubesheet and the heat exchanger head at both the heat exchanger inlet and outlet to the primary piping. The primary restraint of the heat exchanger head (Type 304 stainless steel) is provided by 84 staybolts (Type 303 stainless steel) which attach to the tubesheet. The staybolts were cap seal-welded in the mid-1960`s and are immersed in moderator. Access to inspect the staybolts is limited to a recently-developed ultrasonic technique shooting a beam through the staybolt assembly. Acceptance Criteria to allow disposition of flaws detected by UT inspection have been developed. The structural adequacy to protect against collapse loading of the head is demonstrated by finite element analysis of the head assembly and fracture analysis of flaw postulates in the staybolts. Both normal operation and normal operation plus seismic loading conditions were considered. Several bounding cases containing various configurations of nonactive (exceeding critical flaw size) staybolts were analyzed. The model of the head assembly can be applied to evaluate any active staybolt configurations based on the results from future inspections. 9 refs.
Date: December 31, 1991
Creator: Sindelar, R. L.; Lam, P. S.; Barnes, D. M.; Placr, A. & Morrison, J. M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Acceptance criteria for heat exchanger head staybolts

Description: Each of the six primary coolant loop systems of the Savannah River Site production reactors contains two parallel single-pass heat exchangers to transfer heat from the primary coolant (D{sub 2}O) to the secondary cooling water (H{sub 2}O). The configuration of the heat exchangers includes a plenary space defined by the heat exchanger tubesheet and the heat exchanger head at both the heat exchanger inlet and outlet to the primary piping. The primary restraint of the heat exchanger head (Type 304 stainless steel) is provided by 84 staybolts (Type 303 stainless steel) which attach to the tubesheet. The staybolts were cap seal-welded in the mid-1960's and are immersed in moderator. Access to inspect the staybolts is limited to a recently-developed ultrasonic technique shooting a beam through the staybolt assembly. Acceptance Criteria to allow disposition of flaws detected by UT inspection have been developed. The structural adequacy to protect against collapse loading of the head is demonstrated by finite element analysis of the head assembly and fracture analysis of flaw postulates in the staybolts. Both normal operation and normal operation plus seismic loading conditions were considered. Several bounding cases containing various configurations of nonactive (exceeding critical flaw size) staybolts were analyzed. The model of the head assembly can be applied to evaluate any active staybolt configurations based on the results from future inspections. 9 refs.
Date: January 1, 1991
Creator: Sindelar, R.L.; Lam, P.S.; Barnes, D.M.; Placr, A. & Morrison, J.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Acceptance criteria for reactor coolant pumps and valves

Description: Each of the six primary coolant loop systems of the Savannah River Site (SRS) production reactors contains one reactor coolant pump, one PUMP suction side motor operated valve, and other smaller valves. The pumps me double suction, double volute, and radially split type pumps. The valves are different size shutoff and control valves rated from ANSI B16.5 construction class 150 to class 300. The reactor coolant system components, also known as the process water system (PWS), are classified as nuclear Safety Class I components. These components were constructed in the 1950`s in accordance with the then prevailing industry practices. No uniform construction codes were used for design and analysis of these components. However, no pressure boundary failures or bolting failures have ever been recorded throughout their operating history. Over the years, the in-service inspection (ISI) was limited to visual inspection of the pressure boundaries, and surface and volumetric examination of the pressure retaining bolts. Efforts are now underway to implement ISI requirements similar to the ASME Section XI requirements for pumps and valves. This report discusses the new ISI requirements which also call for volumetric examination of the pump casing and valve body welds.
Date: May 1, 1993
Creator: Gupta, N. K.; Miller, R. F. & Sindelar, R. L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Analysis of OH Bolted Ear Connection

Description: The D0 endcap calorimeter outer hadronic (OH) modules play a major structural role in the calorimeter assembly. The disrete modules, once connected together, form a ring within which other massive calorimetry will reside. It has been proposed that the connection of the OH at the downstream end be accomplished by extending the downstream endplates in the radial direction to form 'ears', and then through-bolting between adjacent ears as shown in Fig. 1. A single 2 1/4 in. dia. bolt is used, and previous calculations have determined that the design load on this joint should be 130,000 lbs tension. The high load and serious consequences of failure make this a critical component in the calorimeter assembly. The purpose of this analysis is to investigate the stresses in the connection and other mechanical characteristics which determine joint performance.
Date: December 30, 1987
Creator: Wands, Bob
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Assessment of void swelling in austenitic stainless steel PWR core internals.

Description: As many pressurized water reactors (PWRs) age and life extension of the aged plants is considered, void swelling behavior of austenitic stainless steel (SS) core internals has become the subject of increasing attention. In this report, the available database on void swelling and density change of austenitic SSs was critically reviewed. Irradiation conditions, test procedures, and microstructural characteristics were carefully examined, and key factors that are important to determine the relevance of the database to PWR conditions were evaluated. Most swelling data were obtained from steels irradiated in fast breeder reactors at temperatures >385 C and at dose rates that are orders of magnitude higher than PWR dose rates. Even for a given irradiation temperature and given steel, the integral effects of dose and dose rate on void swelling should not be separated. It is incorrect to extrapolate swelling data on the basis of 'progressive compounded multiplication' of separate effects of factors such as dose, dose rate, temperature, steel composition, and fabrication procedure. Therefore, the fast reactor data should not be extrapolated to determine credible void swelling behavior for PWR end-of-life (EOL) or life-extension conditions. Although the void swelling data extracted from fast reactor studies is extensive and conclusive, only limited amounts of swelling data and information have been obtained on microstructural characteristics from discharged PWR internals or steels irradiated at temperatures and at dose rates comparable to those of a PWR. Based on this relatively small amount of information, swelling in thin-walled tubes and baffle bolts in a PWR is not considered a concern. As additional data and relevant research becomes available, the newer results should be integrated with existing data, and the worthiness of this conclusion should continue to be scrutinized. PWR baffle reentrant corners are the most likely location to experience high swelling rates, and hence, high ...
Date: January 31, 2006
Creator: Chung, H. M. & Technology, Energy
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

B-Target Room Tunnel Redesigned

Description: Several groups at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory are currently working on a RF Modulator prototype for a future linear collider known as the International Linear Collider (ILC). The ILC runs using about a 1000 Klystrons which create high power carrier waves for the particle acceleration. Klystrons receive their electrical input power from modulators. In order to move beyond the prototype phase, the laboratory might expand its ground base further down a tunnel located at the End Station B (ESB) in order to house four new Klystron Modulator Test Stations. This area is known as the B-Target Room Tunnel, and the task was to redesign the tunnel layout for the upcoming changes. The project first began by collecting substantial amount of information about the prototyped project, the tunnel and the researchers feedback of what they would like to see in the upcoming design. Subsequent to numerous planning and presentations, one particular design was. Calculations for this design were then performed for the most complex aspects of the project. Based on the results of the calculations, specific sample beams, welds, bolts and materials were chosen for the possible future construction.
Date: August 25, 2010
Creator: Esfandiari, Reza & /SLAC, /San Jose State U.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Benefits of thread rolling process to the stress corrosion cracking and fatigue resistance of high strength fasteners

Description: Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of cut (machined) vice thread rolled Alloy X-750 and Alloy 625 fasteners in a simulated high temperature primary water environment has been evaluated. SCC testing at 360 and 338C included 157 small and 40 large 60{degree} Vee thread studs. Thread rolled fasteners had improved resistance relative to cut fasteners. Tests of fatigue resistance in air at room temperature and both air and primary water at 315C were conducted on smaller studs with both cut and rolled threads. Results showed rolled threads can have significantly improved fatigue lives over those of cut threads in both air and primary water. Fasteners produced by two different thread rolling methods, in-feed (radial) and through-feed (axial), revealed similar SCC initiation test results. Testing of thread rolled fasteners revealed no significant SCC or fatigue growth of rolling induced thread crest laps typical of the thread rolling process. While fatigue resistance differed between the two rolled thread supplier`s studs, neither of the suppliers studs showed SCC initiation at exposure times beyond that of cut threads with SCC. In contrast to rolling at room temperature, warm rolled (427C) threads showed no improvement over cut threads in terms of fatigue resistance. The observed improved SCC and fatigue performance of rolled threads is postulated to be due to interactive factors, including beneficial residual stresses in critically stressed thread root region, reduction of plastic strains during loading and formation of favorable microstructure.
Date: May 1, 1993
Creator: Kephart, A. R. & Hayden, S. Z.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

BNL ALARA Center: ALARA Notes, No. 9

Description: This issue of the Brookhaven National Laboratory`s Alara Notes includes the agenda for the Third International Workshop on ALARA and specific instructions on the use of the on-line fax-on-demand service provided by BNL. Other topics included in this issue are: (1) A discussion of low-level discharges from Canadian nuclear plants, (2) Safety issues at French nuclear plants, (3) Acoustic emission as a means of leak detection, (4) Replacement of steam generators at Doel-3, Beaznau, and North Anna-1, (5) Remote handling equipment at Bruce, (6) EPRI`s low level waste program, (7) Radiation protection during concrete repairs at Savannah River, (8) Reactor vessel stud removal/repair at Comanche Peak-1, (9) Rework of reactor coolant pump motors, (10) Restoration of service water at North Anna-1 and -2, (11) Steam generator tubing problems at Mihama-1, (12) Full system decontamination at Indian Point-2, (13) Chemical decontamination at Browns Ferry-2, and (14) Inspection methodolody in France and Japan.
Date: February 1, 1994
Creator: Khan, T.A.; Xie, J.W. & Beckman, M.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Bolt preload selection for pulsed-loaded vessel closures

Description: Bounding, closed-form solutions are developed for selecting the bolt preload for a square, flat plate closure subjected to a pressure pulse load. The solutions consider the limiting case in which preload is primarily dependent on closure bending response as well as the limiting case in which preload depends on elastic bolt response. The selection of bolt preload is illustrated. Also presented in the paper is a detailed finite element analysis of dynamically loaded, bolted circular closure. The responses of the structure, closure, and bolts are included, and results are obtained for various preloads. The analysis illustrates a method of bolt preload modeling for use in general finite element computer programs.
Date: February 1, 1995
Creator: Duffey, T.A.; Lewis, B.B. & Bowers, S.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Canister Transfer System Description Document

Description: The Canister Transfer System receives transportation casks containing large and small disposable canisters, unloads the canisters from the casks, stores the canisters as required, loads them into disposal containers (DCs), and prepares the empty casks for re-shipment. Cask unloading begins with cask inspection, sampling, and lid bolt removal operations. The cask lids are removed and the canisters are unloaded. Small canisters are loaded directly into a DC, or are stored until enough canisters are available to fill a DC. Large canisters are loaded directly into a DC. Transportation casks and related components are decontaminated as required, and empty casks are prepared for re-shipment. One independent, remotely operated canister transfer line is provided in the Waste Handling Building System. The canister transfer line consists of a Cask Transport System, Cask Preparation System, Canister Handling System, Disposal Container Transport System, an off-normal canister handling cell with a transfer tunnel connecting the two cells, and Control and Tracking System. The Canister Transfer System operating sequence begins with moving transportation casks to the cask preparation area with the Cask Transport System. The Cask Preparation System prepares the cask for unloading and consists of cask preparation manipulator, cask inspection and sampling equipment, and decontamination equipment. The Canister Handling System unloads the canister(s) and places them into a DC. Handling equipment consists of a bridge crane/hoist, DC loading manipulator, lifting fixtures, and small canister staging racks. Once the cask has been unloaded, the Cask Preparation System decontaminates the cask exterior and returns it to the Carrier/Cask Handling System via the Cask Transport System. After the DC is fully loaded, the Disposal Container Transport System moves the DC to the Disposal Container Handling System for welding. To handle off-normal canisters, a separate off-normal canister handling cell is located adjacent to the canister transfer cell and is interconnected ...
Date: October 12, 2000
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Cargo response to railcar impact and tiedown load analysis

Description: An analytical study of the loads produced during coupling of railcars carrying heavy shipping containers is presented. The structural model of the impact event is represented by a lumped-parameter technique. Each discrete mass lump possesses longitudinal, vertical, and rotational degrees of freedom. The resulting computer simulation provides for nonlinear railcar coupler stiffness and linear damping forces in the coupler and container tiedowns. Results include response to parametric variations in container weight, impact speed, and tiedown stiffness. Container dynamic response and tiedown loads are found to depend heavily on these parameters. Also, railcar bending and subsequent vertical motion are shown to be important contributors to these responses. When experimentally substantiated, the model developed can serve as a useful tool in the design and evaluation of shipping container tiedown structures.
Date: September 1, 1978
Creator: Bartholomew, R.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Celotex (Registered) Replacement Study

Description: The AL-R8 is the pit storage container in most widespread use at Pantex. The AL-R8 container family consists of standard 20-in.-diameter steel drums, 30 to 60 in. in height, with insulation inserts made of Celotex{reg_sign}--a fiberboard product made from processed sugar cane. Celotex is an acceptable material for inserts in many radioactive material shipping and storage containers. It is a good shock mitigator/insulator, does a fair job in fire protection (when oxygen is excluded), shielding, and criticality, and is inexpensive and easily available. However, the fiberboard absorbs water in humid environments which, when combined with chemical residues in the fiberboard, forms corrosive compounds that can shorten the life of the container and affect container contents. To protect the contents from this potentially damaging environment, the AL-R8 SI was developed to isolate the contents within a sealed stainless steel vessel inside the AL-R8. Although the SI protected the contents, corrosion studies indicated the SI lid bolts might corrode over time and surveillance showed that areas of the outer drum were still subject to corrosion. To address this potential problem, DOE/Albuquerque sponsored bolt and Celotex replacement studies. The bolt replacement study was assigned to Mason and Hanger's Pantex Facility and this Celotex Replacement Study to Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The Celotex Replacement Study evaluated options for replacing Celotex with a material that is chemically compatible with the AL-R8 SI container. The evaluation was limited to materials either used previously in nuclear materials shipping and storage containers or materials with known properties in a low-radiation environment. This limitation was set to ensure that the long-term aging effect on the new material is known a priori. Initial material evaluations narrowed the material choices to foam and cork. Although cork performed better than foam in some tests, cork was considered a less advantageous replacement material ...
Date: October 1, 2002
Creator: Couture, S & Hafner, R
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Characterization of shape memory alloys for safety mechanisms.

Description: Shape memory alloys (SMAs) are metals that exhibit large recoverable strains and exert large forces with tremendous energy densities. The behavior of SMAs is thermomechanically coupled. Their response to temperature is sensitive to their loading condition and their response to loading is sensitive to their thermal condition. This coupled behavior is not to be circumvented, but to be confronted and understood, since it is what manifests SMA's superior clamping performance. To reasonably characterize the coupled behavior of SMA clamping rings used in safety mechanisms, we conduct a series of experiments on SMA samples. The results of the tests will allow increased fidelity in modeling and failure analysis of parts.
Date: March 1, 2008
Creator: McLaughlin, Jarred T.; Buchheit, Thomas Edward & Massad, Jordan Elias
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Chemistry of Water Collected From an Unventillated Drift, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

Description: The chemical composition of water that may be present in the emplacement drifts is a key issue for the isolation of high-level radioactive waste in a proposed mined geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Chemical constituents in water that may contact waste containers may affect rates of corrosion of the container materials. Long-term simulations of the in-drift chemical environment rely on ambient water chemistry, heat perturbations, and the interaction of ambient water with the engineered barriers (e.g. waste containers) and other introduced materials (e.g. rock bolts). In an attempt to induce seepage in the Enhanced Characterization of the Repository Block Cross Drift, bulkheads were constructed to isolate part of the 2.7-km-long drift from active ventilation. The bulkheads were closed and active ventilation ceased for periods up.to 454 days. After opening the bulkheads, water was observed in small puddles on plastic sheets and on rubber conveyor belt surfaces; droplets of water were observed on many surfaces of various construction-related introduced materials. Mold or fungal colonies also were present. The puddles of water were sampled seven times from January 2003 to June 2005; most samples appeared yellow to brown. The water samples were analyzed for major and trace constituents by using ion chromatography and inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Total dissolved solids (TDS) in the puddle-water samples ranged from 195 to 22,000 milligrams per liter (mg/L) and pH ranged from 4.2 to 8.9; these values are different from ambient pore-water samples extracted from adjacent rock (TDS < 1,400 mg/L and pH from 6.7 to 8.2). The chemical composition of the puddle-water samples is dominated by sodium and chloride, also different from the pore-water samples, which are dominated by sodium, calcium, and bicarbonate. Zinc concentrations ranged from 0.5 to 3,100 mg/L, substantially greater than the less than 0.1 mg/L values measured in pore water. ...
Date: June 20, 2006
Creator: Marshall, B.D.; Oliver, T.A. & Peterman, Z.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Cleanup Verification Package for the 600-47 Waste Site

Description: This cleanup verification package documents completion of interim remedial action for the 600-47 waste site. This site consisted of several areas of surface debris and contamination near the banks of the Columbia River across from Johnson Island. Contaminated material identified in field surveys included four areas of soil, wood, nuts, bolts, and other metal debris.
Date: August 26, 2005
Creator: Cutlip, M. J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

COMPILATION OF DISPOSABLE SOLID WASTE CASK EVALUATIONS

Description: The Disposable Solid Waste Cask (DSWC) is a shielded cask capable of transporting, storing, and disposing of six non-fuel core components or approximately 27 cubic feet of radioactive solid waste. Five existing DSWCs are candidates for use in storing and disposing of non-fuel core components and radioactive solid waste from the Interim Examination and Maintenance Cell, ultimately shipping them to the 200 West Area disposal site for burial. A series of inspections, studies, analyses, and modifications were performed to ensure that these casks can be used to safely ship solid waste. These inspections, studies, analyses, and modifications are summarized and attached in this report. Visual inspection of the casks interiors provided information with respect to condition of the casks inner liners. Because water was allowed to enter the casks for varying lengths of time, condition of the cask liner pipe to bottom plate weld was of concern. Based on the visual inspection and a corrosion study, it was concluded that four of the five casks can be used from a corrosion standpoint. Only DSWC S/N-004 would need additional inspection and analysis to determine its usefulness. The five remaining DSWCs underwent some modification to prepare them for use. The existing cask lifting inserts were found to be corroded and deemed unusable. New lifting anchor bolts were installed to replace the existing anchors. Alternate lift lugs were fabricated for use with the new lifting anchor bolts. The cask tiedown frame was modified to facilitate adjustment of the cask tiedowns. As a result of the above mentioned inspections, studies, analysis, and modifications, four of the five existing casks can be used to store and transport waste from the Interim Examination and Maintenance Cell to the disposal site for burial. The fifth cask, DSWC S/N-004, would require further inspections before it could be used.
Date: June 21, 2007
Creator: THIELGES, J.R. & CHASTAIN, S.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A computational study of tandem dual wheel aerodynamics and the effect of fenders and fairings on spray dispersion

Description: With the goal of understanding how to mitigate the safety hazard of splash and spray around heavy vehicles, a computational study of the aerodynamics and spray dispersion about a simplified trailer wheel assembly has been completed. A tandem dual slick (TDS) wheel model that neglects complex geometric features such as brakes, wheel bolts and wheel cutouts but with the same dimensions as an actual trailer wheel assembly was used . A detailed simulation of the wheels alone demonstrated that the flow field is both unsteady and complex, containing a number of vortical structures that interact strongly with spray. Preliminary simulations with fenders and fairings demonstrated that these devices prevent the ballistic transport of drops larger than approximately 0.1 mm, but the fine mist speculated to be responsible for visibility reduction is unaffected. This work suggests that to use computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to design and evaluate spray mitigation strategies the jet or sheet breakup processes can be modeled using an array of injectors of small (< 0.01 mm) water droplets; however the choice of size distribution, injection locations, directions and velocities is largely unknown and requires further study. Possible containment strategies would include using flow structures to 'focus' particles into regions away from passing cars or surface treatments to capture small drops.
Date: January 13, 2006
Creator: Paschkewitz, J S
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department