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Characterization and modification of fluid conductivity in heterogeneous reservoirs to improve sweep efficiency. [Quarterly report], April 1--June 30, 1993

Description: Work performed during this quarter was aimed at investigating the behavior of foamed gel using our newly developed model. Three porous medium and gel properties were systematically varied to determine their effect on the foamed gel breakdown process; The pore throat size distribution standard deviation, {sigma}, was varied to investigate the effect of microscopic heterogeneities. Three different rupture pressure relationships (RPR) were used to simulate gels with different yield functionalities. Two different deformation constant relationships (DCR) were used to study gel elasticity. The variance between runs with different properties was adequately revealed using a 10 by 10 network; thus larger networks were avoided and computational effort saved. The pore throat and lens dimensions were assigned to the network via random sampling of a normal distribution. The maximum and minimum bond diameters were the mean bond size, plus or minus three standard deviations, respectively. A mean lens length and standard deviation of 1e{sup {minus}4} m, and 3e{sup {minus}6} m, were used in every run. A narrow lens size distribution was used in absence of a relationship between lens length and pore throat diameter. Furthermore, foamed gel heterogeneity could be simulated easily by varying the pore throat size distribution against the narrow lens length distribution. This technical progress report discusses only one of the interesting results found during our modeling investigation, the effect of gel elasticity on foamed gel breakdown.
Date: October 1, 1993
Creator: Fogler, H. S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Characterization and modification of fluid conductivity in heterogeneous reservoirs to improve sweep efficiency. [Quarterly report, July--September 1993]

Description: The main objectives of this project were to develop new treatment strategies that would improve the efficiency of oil production, and stimulation procedures. Treatment strategies were developed to treat injection well matrix heterogeneities, production well matrix or saturation heterogeneities, and fractured wells. The treatment strategies investigated included a particulate system, and a foamed gel for injection well profile modification, a foam/acid injection strategy for improving acidization of carbonates, an acid reactive gel for controlling acid leak-off into fractures, and a water reactive gel for water shut-off at production wells. The research performed focused on discovering the principles governing the performance of the treatment strategies to provide a fundamental basis for further development of these techniques. Other goals of this project were to demonstrate the use of Neutron Imaging for real time imaging of fluid flow through heterogeneous porous media and develop a kinetic model to simulate the effect of diagenetic processes on reservoir porosity and permeability.
Date: December 1, 1993
Creator: Fogler, H. S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Characterization and modification of fluid conductivity in heterogeneous reservoirs to improve sweep efficiency. Second quarterly report, January 1--March 31, 1992

Description: To optimize the petroleum recovery process from a formation, it is essential to accurately characterize potential reservoirs in terms of porosity, permeability, and hydrocarbon content. The quality of a given reservoir is determined by diagenetic processes that have been occurring over very long periods of time. The ability to mathematically model diagenetic processes and to predict a reservoir`s characteristics provides a great tool to help evaluate formations. This report describes, the model currently used to perform these tasks. The existing network model was upgraded to more realistically simulate a porous media. Although many of the features from the previous model remain, two major modifications were made to improve upon the previous model: (1) the extension of the two-dimensional model into three-dimensions; and (2) the inclusion of pore bodies in the network model. The advantages that this model has over the previous model include: (1) a more accurate geometric representation (3-D vs. 2-D) of a reservoir; (2) pore bodies with fmite volumes where reactions can occur (as opposed to points of mixing); (3) a more distinguishable picture of various flow phenomena (wormholing, dominant flow paths, etc.); (4) the potential for observing back flow in the media; and (5) more realistic changes in porosity, i.e. pore body effects. The model was tested for the acidization of limestone with HCl. In this particular system, the important parameter studied was the effect of the Damkohler number (ratio of acid consumption rate to acid convection rate) on the propagation of acid through the porous limestone.
Date: December 31, 1992
Creator: Fogler, H. S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Characterization of facies and permeability patterns in carbonate reservoirs based on outcrop analogs

Description: The primary objective of this research is to develop methods for better describing the three-dimensional geometry of carbonate reservoir flow units as related to conventional or enhanced recovery of oil. Detailed characterization of geologic facies and rock permeability in reservoir-scale outcrops of the Permian San Andres Formation in the Guadalupe Mountains of New Mexico will provide the key data base. To this end detailed sampling on grids using a portable core-plugging device was undertaken within a previously established detailed geologic framework. Petrophysical and rock-fabric data from these sampling grids has been obtained and analysized. The next step is to relate the petrophysical data to the geologic framework, prepare a simulation grid, and perform experimental computer flow simulations. Progress during this quarter focused on (1) relationships between rock-fabric and petrophysical data and (2) development of a geostatistical model of permeability distribution in preparation for quantifying the simulation grid. 2 figs.
Date: January 1, 1991
Creator: Kerans, C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Characterization of facies and permeability patterns in carbonate reservoirs based on outcrop analogs. Final report

Description: The primary objective of this research is to develop methods for better describing the three-dimensional geometry of carbonate reservoir flow units as related to conventional or enhanced recovery of oil. San Andres and Grayburg reservoirs were selected for study because of the 13 Bbbl of remaining mobile oil and 17 Bbbl of residual oil in these reservoirs. The key data base is provided by detailed characterization of geologic facies and rock permeability in reservior-scale outcrops of the Permian San Andres Formation in the Guadalupe Mountains of New Mexico. Emphasis is placed on developing an outcrop analog for San Andres strata that can be used as (1) a guide to interpreting the regional and local geologic framework of the subsurface reservoirs (2) a data source illustrating the scales and patterns of variability of rock-fabric facies and petrophysical properties, particularly in lateral dimension, and on scales that cannot be studied during subsurface reservoir characterization. The research approach taken to achieve these objectives utilizes the integration of geologic description, geostatistical techniques, and reservoir flow simulation experiments. Results from this research show that the spatial distribution of facies relative to the waterflood direction can significantly affect how the reservoir produces. Bypassing of unswept oil occurs due to cross flow of injected water from high permeability zones into lower permeability zones were high permeability zones terminate. An area of unswept oil develops because of the slower advance of the water-injection front in the lower permeability zones. When the injection pattern is reversed, the cross-flow effect changes due to the different arrangements of rock-fabric flow units relative to the flow of injected water, and the sweep efficiency is significantly different. Flow across low-permeability mudstones occurs showing that these layers do not necessarily represent flow barriers.
Date: July 1, 1993
Creator: Kerans, C.; Lucia, F. J.; Senger, R. K.; Fogg, G. E.; Nance, H. S. & Hovorka, S. D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

CHARACTERIZATION OF GEOLOGICAL MATERIALS USING ION AND PHOTON BEAMS

Description: Geological specimens are often complex materials that require different analytical methods for their characterization. The parameters of interest may include the chemical composition of major, minor and trace elements. The chemical compounds incorporated in the minerals, the crystal structure and isotopic composition need to be considered. Specimens may be highly heterogeneous thus necessitating analytical methods capable of measurements on small sample volumes with high spatial resolution and sensitivity. Much essential information on geological materials can be obtained by using ion or photon beams. In this chapter the authors describe the principal analytical techniques based on particle accelerators, showing some applications that are hardly possible with conventional methods. In particular, the following techniques will be discussed: (1) Synchrotron radiation (SR) induced X-ray emission (SRIXE) and particle-induced X-ray emission (PEE) and other ion beam techniques for trace element analysis; and (2) Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) for ultra sensitive analysis of stable nuclides and long-lived radionuclides. In most of the cases also the possibilities of elemental and isotopic analysis with high resolution will be discussed.
Date: November 1998
Creator: Torok, Sz. B.; Jones, K. W. & Tuniz, C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Characterization of hydrogeologic units using matrix properties, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

Description: Determination of the suitability of Yucca Mountain, in southern Nevada, as a geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste requires the use of numerical flow and transport models. Input for these models includes parameters that describe hydrologic properties and the initial and boundary conditions for all rock materials within the unsaturated zone, as well as some of the upper rocks in the saturated zone. There are 30 hydrogeologic units in the unsaturated zone, and each unit is defined by limited ranges where a discrete volume of rock contains similar hydrogeologic properties. These hydrogeologic units can be easily located in space by using three-dimensional lithostratigraphic models based on relationships of the properties with the lithostratigraphy. Physical properties of bulk density, porosity, and particle density; flow properties of saturated hydraulic conductivity and moisture-retention characteristics; and the state variables (variables describing the current state of field conditions) of saturation and water potential were determined for each unit. Units were defined using (1) a data base developed from 4,892 rock samples collected from the coring of 23 shallow and 8 deep boreholes, (2) described lithostratigraphic boundaries and corresponding relations to porosity, (3) recognition of transition zones with pronounced changes in properties over short vertical distances, (4) characterization of the influence of mineral alteration on hydrologic properties such as permeability and moisture-retention characteristics, and (5) a statistical analysis to evaluate where boundaries should be adjusted to minimize the variance within layers. This study describes the correlation of hydrologic properties to porosity, a property that is well related to the lithostratigraphy and depositional and cooling history of the volcanic deposits and can, therefore, be modeled to be distributed laterally.
Date: September 1, 1998
Creator: Flint, L.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Characterization of Mixed Wettability at Different Scales and its Impact on Oil Recovery Efficiency

Description: The objectives of this project was to: (1) quantify the pore scale mechanisms that determine the wettability state of a reservoir, (2) study the effect of crude oil, brine and mineral compositions in the establishment of mixed wet states, (3) clarify the effect of mixed - wettability on oil displacement efficiency in waterfloods, (4) develop a new tracer technique to measure wettability, fluid distributions, residual saturation's and relative permeabilities, and (5) develop methods for properly incorporating wettability in up-scaling from pore to core to reservoir scales.
Date: January 28, 2002
Creator: Sharma, Mukul M. & Hirasaki, George J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Characterization of non-Darcy multiphase flow in petroleum bearing formation. Final report

Description: The productive capacity of oil and gas bearing rocks depends on various parameters characterizing the flow conditions in the reservoir. Among these, the non-Darcy flow coefficient specifically plays an important role for cases involving fluid accelerations or decelerations around the well bore and in the reservoir. However, most reservoir simulators used for reservoir management assume Darcy flow, and yield misleading results causing an incorrect analysis or projection of reservoir performance. A few attempts have been made to incorporate non-Darcy effect in reservoir models but many of these lack a reliable accuracy since they use simplified correlations which ignore the effects of the variation of the fluid and formation conditions. The present study developed an accurate non-Darcy flow model that will lead to more accurate reservoir management decisions. First, a rigorous analysis and derivation of the porous media mass and momentum equations are presented considering the non-Darcy flow behavior. Second, steady-state and unsteady-state methods for simultaneous determination of relative permeability, capillary pressure, and interfacial drag during non-Darcy flow in laboratory cores are derived. This work results in several algebraic, integral, and differential interpretation methods. Third, correlations for the non-Darcy flow coefficient are investigated and improved. The study presented in this report provides new insights and formulations in the description of non-Darcy flow in oil and gas bearing formations.
Date: April 1, 1994
Creator: Evans, R. D. & Civan, F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Characterization of non-Darcy multiphase flow in petroleum bearing formations. Annual status report, May 14, 1991--May 13, 1992

Description: The objectives of this research are: Develop a proper theoretical model for characterizing non-Darcy multi-phase flow in petroleum bearing formations. Develop an experimental technique for measuring non-Darcy flow coefficients under multiphase flow at insitu reservoir conditions. Develop dimensional consistent correlations to express the non-Darcy flow coefficient as a function of rock and fluid properties for consolidated and unconsolidated porous media. The research accomplished during the period May 1991--May 1992 focused upon theoretical and experimental studies of multiphase non-Darcy flow in porous media.
Date: December 31, 1992
Creator: Evans, R. D. & Civan, F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Characterization of non-Darcy multiphase flow in petroleum bearing formations. [Quarterly] report, January 1--March 30, 1993

Description: The objectives of this research are: Develop a proper theoretical model for characterizing non-Darcy multi-phase flow in petroleum bearing formations. Develop an experimental technique for measuring non-Darcy flow coefficients under multiphase flow at insitu reservoir conditions. Develop dimensional consistent correlations to express the non-Darcy flow coefficient as a function of rock and fluid properties for consolidated and unconsolidated porous media. The research accomplished during the period January 1993--March 1993 was focused upon theoretical and experimental studies to more accurately describe multiphase flow in porous media.
Date: December 31, 1993
Creator: Evans, R. D. & Civan, F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Characterization of oil and gas reservoir heterogeneity

Description: The ultimate objective of this cooperative research project is to characterize Alaskan petroleum reservoirs in terms of their reserves, physical and chemical properties, geologic configuration in relation to lithofacies and structure, and development potential. The project has two tasks: Task 1 is a geological description of the reservoirs including petrophysical properties, i.e., porosity, permeability, permeability variation, formation depth, temperature, and net pay, facies changes and reservoir structures as drawn from cores, well logs, and other geological data. Task 2 is reservoir fluid characterization -- determination of physical properties of reservoir fluids including density, viscosity, phase distributions and composition as well as petrogenesis -- source rock identification; and the study of asphaltene precipitation for Alaskan crude oils.
Date: January 1, 1992
Creator: Sharma, G.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Characterization of oil and gas reservoir heterogeneity

Description: The ultimate objective of this cooperative research project is to characterize Alaskan petroleum reservoirs in terms of their reserves, physical and chemical properties, geologic configuration in relation to lithofacies and structure, and development potential. The project has two tasks: Task 1 is a geological description of the reservoirs including petrophysical properties, i.e., porosity, permeability, permeability variation, formation depth, temperature, and net pay, facies changes and reservoir structures as drawn from cores, well logs, and other geological data. Task 2 is reservoir fluid characterization -- determination of physical properties of reservoir fluids including density, viscosity, phase distributions and composition as well as petrogenesis -- source rock identification; and the study of asphaltene precipitation for Alaskan crude oils.
Date: January 1, 1991
Creator: Sharma, G.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Characterization of oil and gas reservoir heterogeneity

Description: The ultimate objective of this cooperative research project is to characterize Alaskan petroleum reservoirs in terms of their reserves, physical and chemical properties, geologic configuration in relation to lithofacies and structure, and development potential. The project has two tasks: Task 1 is a geological description of the reservoirs including petrophysical properties, i.e., porosity, permeability, permeability variation, formation depth, temperature, and net pay, facies changes and reservoir structures as drawn from cores, well logs, and other geological data. Task 2 is reservoir fluid characterization -- determination of physical properties of reservoir fluids including density, viscosity, phase distributions and composition as well as petrogenesis -- source rock identification; and the study of asphaltene precipitation for Alaskan crude oils.
Date: January 1, 1991
Creator: Sharma, G.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Characterization of oil and gas reservoir heterogeneity

Description: The objective of the cooperative research program is to characterize Alaskan reservoirs in terms of their reserves, physical and chemical properties, geologic configuration and structure, and the development potential. The tasks completed during this period include: (1) geologic reservoir description of Endicott Field; (2) petrographic characterization of core samples taken from selected stratigraphic horizons of the West Sak and Ugnu (Brookian) wells; (3) development of a polydispersed thermodynamic model for predicting asphaltene equilibria and asphaltene precipitation from crude oil-solvent mixtures, and (4) preliminary geologic description of the Milne Point Unit.
Date: January 1, 1991
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Characterization of oil and gas reservoir heterogeneity

Description: Research described In this report addresses the internal architecture of two specific reservoir types: restricted-platform carbonates and fluvial-deltaic sandstones. Together, these two reservoir types contain more than two-thirds of the unrecovered mobile oil remaining ill Texas. The approach followed in this study was to develop a strong understanding of the styles of heterogeneity of these reservoir types based on a detailed outcrop description and a translation of these findings into optimized recovery strategies in select subsurface analogs. Research targeted Grayburg Formation restricted-platform carbonate outcrops along the Algerita Escarpment and In Stone Canyon In southeastern New Mexico and Ferron deltaic sandstones in central Utah as analogs for the North Foster (Grayburg) and Lake Creek (Wilcox) units, respectively. In both settings, sequence-stratigraphic style profoundly influenced between-well architectural fabric and permeability structure. It is concluded that reservoirs of different depositional origins can therefore be categorized Into a heterogeneity matrix'' based on varying intensity of vertical and lateral heterogeneity. The utility of the matrix is that it allows prediction of the nature and location of remaining mobile oil. Highly stratified reservoirs such as the Grayburg, for example, will contain a large proportion of vertically bypassed oil; thus, an appropriate recovery strategy will be waterflood optimization and profile modification. Laterally heterogeneous reservoirs such as deltaic distributary systems would benefit from targeted infill drilling (possibly with horizontal wells) and improved areal sweep efficiency. Potential for advanced recovery of remaining mobile oil through heterogeneity-based advanced secondary recovery strategies In Texas is projected to be an Incremental 16 Bbbl. In the Lower 48 States this target may be as much as 45 Bbbl at low to moderate oil prices over the near- to mid-term.
Date: October 1, 1992
Creator: Tyler, N.; Barton, M. D.; Bebout, D. G.; Fisher, R. S.; Grigsby, J. D.; Guevara, E. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Characterization of oil and gas reservoir heterogeneity

Description: The ultimate objective of this cooperative research project is to characterize Alaskan petroleum reservoirs in terms of their reserves, physical and chemical properties, geologic configuration in relation to lithofacies and structure, and development potential. The project has two tasks: Task 1 is a geological description of the reservoirs including petrophysical properties, i.e., porosity, permeability, permeability variation, formation depth, temperature, and net pay, facies changes and reservoir structures as drawn from cores, well logs, and other geological data. Task 2 is reservoir fluid characterization-determination of physical properties of reservoir fluids including density, viscosity, phase distributions and composition as well as petrogenesis-source rock identification; and the study of asphaltene precipitation for Alaskan crude oils. Results are discussed.
Date: January 1, 1992
Creator: Sharma, G. D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Characterization of oil and gas reservoir heterogeneity. Annual report, November 1, 1990--October 31, 1991

Description: The objective of the cooperative research program is to characterize Alaskan reservoirs in terms of their reserves, physical and chemical properties, geologic configuration and structure, and the development potential. The tasks completed during this period include: (1) geologic reservoir description of Endicott Field; (2) petrographic characterization of core samples taken from selected stratigraphic horizons of the West Sak and Ugnu (Brookian) wells; (3) development of a polydispersed thermodynamic model for predicting asphaltene equilibria and asphaltene precipitation from crude oil-solvent mixtures, and (4) preliminary geologic description of the Milne Point Unit.
Date: December 31, 1991
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Characterization of oil and gas reservoir heterogeneity. Final report

Description: Research described In this report addresses the internal architecture of two specific reservoir types: restricted-platform carbonates and fluvial-deltaic sandstones. Together, these two reservoir types contain more than two-thirds of the unrecovered mobile oil remaining ill Texas. The approach followed in this study was to develop a strong understanding of the styles of heterogeneity of these reservoir types based on a detailed outcrop description and a translation of these findings into optimized recovery strategies in select subsurface analogs. Research targeted Grayburg Formation restricted-platform carbonate outcrops along the Algerita Escarpment and In Stone Canyon In southeastern New Mexico and Ferron deltaic sandstones in central Utah as analogs for the North Foster (Grayburg) and Lake Creek (Wilcox) units, respectively. In both settings, sequence-stratigraphic style profoundly influenced between-well architectural fabric and permeability structure. It is concluded that reservoirs of different depositional origins can therefore be categorized Into a ``heterogeneity matrix`` based on varying intensity of vertical and lateral heterogeneity. The utility of the matrix is that it allows prediction of the nature and location of remaining mobile oil. Highly stratified reservoirs such as the Grayburg, for example, will contain a large proportion of vertically bypassed oil; thus, an appropriate recovery strategy will be waterflood optimization and profile modification. Laterally heterogeneous reservoirs such as deltaic distributary systems would benefit from targeted infill drilling (possibly with horizontal wells) and improved areal sweep efficiency. Potential for advanced recovery of remaining mobile oil through heterogeneity-based advanced secondary recovery strategies In Texas is projected to be an Incremental 16 Bbbl. In the Lower 48 States this target may be as much as 45 Bbbl at low to moderate oil prices over the near- to mid-term.
Date: October 1, 1992
Creator: Tyler, N.; Barton, M. D.; Bebout, D. G.; Fisher, R. S.; Grigsby, J. D.; Guevara, E. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Characterization of oil and gas reservoir heterogeneity; Final report, November 1, 1989--June 30, 1993

Description: The Alaskan North Slope comprises one of the Nation`s and the world`s most prolific oil province. Original oil in place (OOIP) is estimated at nearly 70 BBL (Kamath and Sharma, 1986). Generalized reservoir descriptions have been completed by the University of Alaska`s Petroleum Development Laboratory over North Slope`s major fields. These fields include West Sak (20 BBL OOIP), Ugnu (15 BBL OOIP), Prudhoe Bay (23 BBL OOIP), Kuparuk (5.5 BBL OOIP), Milne Point (3 BBL OOIP), and Endicott (1 BBL OOIP). Reservoir description has included the acquisition of open hole log data from the Alaska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (AOGCC), computerized well log analysis using state-of-the-art computers, and integration of geologic and logging data. The studies pertaining to fluid characterization described in this report include: experimental study of asphaltene precipitation for enriched gases, CO{sup 2} and West Sak crude system, modeling of asphaltene equilibria including homogeneous as well as polydispersed thermodynamic models, effect of asphaltene deposition on rock-fluid properties, fluid properties of some Alaskan north slope reservoirs. Finally, the last chapter summarizes the reservoir heterogeneity classification system for TORIS and TORIS database.
Date: September 1, 1993
Creator: Sharma, G.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Characterization of oil and gas reservoir heterogeneity. [Quarterly report], January 1, 1993--March 31, 1993

Description: The ultimate objective of this cooperative research project is to characterize Alaskan petroleum reservoirs in terms of their reserves, physical and chemical properties, geologic configuration in relation to lithofacies and structure, and development potential. The project has two tasks: Task I is a geological description of the reservoirs including petrophysical properties, i.e., porosity, permeability, permeability variation, formation depth, temperature, and net pay, facies changes and reservoir structures as drawn from cores, well logs, and other geological data. Task 2 is reservoir fluid characterization--determination of physical properties of reservoir fluids including density, viscosity, phase distributions and composition as well as petrogenesis--source rock identification; and the study of asphaltene precipitation for Alaskan crude oils.
Date: April 1, 1993
Creator: Sharma, G. D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Characterization of oil and gas reservoir heterogeneity. [Quarterly technical progress report], April 1, 1993--June 30, 1993

Description: The ultimate objective of this cooperative research project is to characterize Alaskan petroleum reservoirs in terms of their reserves, physical and chemical properties, geologic configuration in relation to lithofacies and structure, and development potential. The project has two tasks: Task I is a geological description of the reservoirs including petrophysical properties, i.e., porosity, permeability, permeability variation, formation depth, temperature, and net pay, facies changes and reservoir structures as drawn from cores, well logs, and other geological data. Task 2 is reservoir fluid characterization--determination of physical properties of reservoir fluids including density, viscosity, phase distributions and composition as well as petrogenesis--source rock identification; and the study of asphaltene precipitation for Alaskan crude oils.
Date: August 1, 1993
Creator: Sharma, G. D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Characterization of oil and gas reservoir heterogeneity. Technical progress report, April 1, 1992--June 30, 1992

Description: The ultimate objective of this cooperative research project is to characterize Alaskan petroleum reservoirs in terms of their reserves, physical and chemical properties, geologic configuration in relation to lithofacies and structure, and development potential. The project has two tasks: Task 1 is a geological description of the reservoirs including petrophysical properties, i.e., porosity, permeability, permeability variation, formation depth, temperature, and net pay, facies changes and reservoir structures as drawn from cores, well logs, and other geological data. Task 2 is reservoir fluid characterization-determination of physical properties of reservoir fluids including density, viscosity, phase distributions and composition as well as petrogenesis-source rock identification; and the study of asphaltene precipitation for Alaskan crude oils. Results are discussed.
Date: October 1, 1992
Creator: Sharma, G. D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Characterization of oil and gas reservoir heterogeneity. Technical progress report, January 1, 1992--March 31, 1992

Description: The ultimate objective of this cooperative research project is to characterize Alaskan petroleum reservoirs in terms of their reserves, physical and chemical properties, geologic configuration in relation to lithofacies and structure, and development potential. The project has two tasks: Task 1 is a geological description of the reservoirs including petrophysical properties, i.e., porosity, permeability, permeability variation, formation depth, temperature, and net pay, facies changes and reservoir structures as drawn from cores, well logs, and other geological data. Task 2 is reservoir fluid characterization -- determination of physical properties of reservoir fluids including density, viscosity, phase distributions and composition as well as petrogenesis -- source rock identification; and the study of asphaltene precipitation for Alaskan crude oils.
Date: August 1, 1992
Creator: Sharma, G. D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department