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[Band setting up in UNT on the Square]

Description: Photograph of a band setting up in the UNT on the Square space in downtown Denton. The players are wearing Christmas themed clothing for the Tree Lighting Ceremony and the conductor is wearing a "Buddy the Elf" costume. The band members seem to have either Euphoniums or Tubas to play and there are candy cane boxes on the floor in front of them.
Date: 2015~
Creator: Clark, Junebug
Location Info:
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[Crowd gathered for tree lighting]

Description: Photograph of the crowd gathered on Denton Square for the annual Holiday Tree Lighting ceremony. They are all standing in the street and behind them several businesses are visible, including The Chestnut Tree Teahouse & Bistro, County Seat Antiques, the Welcome to Denton Center, LSA Burger, Mad World Records, and Beth Marie's Old Fashioned Ice Cream.
Date: 2015~
Creator: Clark, Junebug
Location Info:
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

Pedestrian Friendly Outdoor Lighting

Description: This GATEWAY report discusses the problems of pedestrian lighting that occur with all technologies with a focus on the unique optical options and opportunities offered by LEDs through the findings from two pedestrian-focused projects, one at Stanford University in California, and one at the Chautauqua Institution in upstate New York. Incorporating user feedback this report reviews the tradeoffs that must be weighed among visual comfort, color, visibility, efficacy and other factors to stimulate discussion among specifiers, users, energy specialists, and in industry in hopes that new approaches, metrics, and standards can be developed to support pedestrian-focused communities, while reducing energy use.
Date: December 31, 2013
Creator: Miller, Naomi J.; Koltai, Rita & McGowan, Terry
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Evaluation of a Multifamily Retrofit in Climate Zone 5, Boulder, Colorado (Fact Sheet)

Description: In 2009, a 37-unit apartment complex located in Boulder, Colorado, underwent an energy retrofit to comply with Boulder SmartRegs Ordinance, a mandate that requires all rental properties to meet certain energy efficiency standards by 2018. The Consortium of Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB), a U.S. Department of Energy Building America team, worked with city planners and building owners to evaluate this program and recently completed a case study evaluating the effectiveness of a collection of retrofit measures.
Date: November 1, 2013
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Performance House: A Cold Climate Challenge Home, Old Greenwich, Connecticut (Fact Sheet)

Description: By working with builder partners on test homes, researchers from the U.S. Department of Energy's Building America program can vet whole-house building strategies and avoid potential unintended consequences of implementing untested solution packages on a production scale. To support this research, Building America team Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) partnered with Preferred Builders Inc. on a high-performance test home in Old Greenwich, Connecticut. The philosophy and science behind the 2,700 ft2 "Performance House" was based on the premise that homes should be safe, healthy, comfortable, durable, efficient, and adaptable to the needs of homeowners. The technologies and strategies used in the "Performance House" were best practices rather than cutting edge, with a focus on simplicity in construction, maintenance, and operation. Achieving 30% source energy savings compared with a home built to the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code in the cold climate zone requires that nearly all components and systems be optimized. Careful planning and design are critical. The end result was a DOE Challenge Home that achieved a Home Energy Rating System (HERS) Index Score of 20 (43 without photovoltaics [PV]).
Date: November 1, 2013
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Predicted Versus Actual Savings for a Low-Rise Multifamily Retrofit in Boulder, Colorado

Description: To determine the most cost-effective methods of improving buildings, accurate analysis and prediction of the energy use of existing buildings is essential. However, multiple studies confirm that analysis methods tend to over-predict energy use in poorly insulated, leaky homes and thus, the savings associated with improving those homes. In NREL's report titled 'Assessing and Improving the Accuracy of Energy Analysis of Residential Buildings,' researchers propose a method for improving the accuracy of residential energy analysis methods. A key step in this process involves the comparisons of predicted versus metered energy use and savings. In support of this research need, CARB evaluated the retrofit of a multifamily building in Boulder, CO. The updated property is a 37 unit, 2 story apartment complex built in 1950, which underwent renovations in early 2009 to bring it into compliance with Boulder, CO's SmartRegs ordinance. Goals of the study were to: 1) evaluate predicted versus actual savings due to the improvements, 2) identify areas where the modeling assumptions may need to be changed, and 3) determine common changes made by renters that would negatively impact energy savings. In this study, CARB seeks to improve the accuracy of modeling software while assessing retrofit measures to specifically determine which are most effective for large multifamily complexes in the cold climate region. Other issues that were investigated include the effects of improving building efficiency on tenant comfort, the impact on tenant turnover rates, and the potential market barriers for this type of community scale project.
Date: November 1, 2013
Creator: Arena, L. & Williamson, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Dimming LEDs with Phase-Cut Dimmers: The Specifier's Process for Maximizing Success

Description: This report reviews how phase-cut dimmers work, how LEDs differ from the incandescent lamps that the dimmers were historically designed to control, and how these differences can lead to complications when trying to dim LEDs. Compatibility between a specific LED source and a specific phase-cut dimmer is often unknown and difficult to assess, and ensuring compatibility adds complexity to the design, specification, bidding, and construction observation phases for new buildings and major remodel projects. To maximize project success, this report provides both general guidance and step-by-step procedures for designing phase-controlled LED dimming on both new and existing projects, as well as real-world examples of how to use those procedures.
Date: October 1, 2013
Creator: Miller, Naomi J. & Poplawski, Michael E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

DOE CALiPER Program, Report 20.1 Subjective Evaluation of Beam Quality, Shadow Quality, and Color Quality for LED PAR38 Lamps

Description: This report focuses on human-evaluated characteristics, including beam quality, shadow quality, and color quality. Using a questionnaire that included rank ordering, opinions on 27 of the Report 20 PAR38 lamps were gathered during a demonstration event for members of the local Illuminating Engineering Society (IES) chapter. This was not a rigorous scientific experiment, and the data should not be extrapolated beyond the scope of the demonstration. The results suggest that many of the LED products compared favorably to halogen PAR38 benchmarks in all attributes considered. LED lamps using a single-emitter design were generally preferred for their beam quality and shadow quality, and the IES members ranking of color quality did not always match the rank according to the color rendering index (CRI).
Date: October 1, 2013
Creator: Royer, Michael P.; Poplawski, Michael E. & Miller, Naomi J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Lumen Maintenance and Light Loss Factors: Consequences of Current Design Practices for LED's

Description: Synopsis: Light loss factors are used to help lighting systems meet quantitative design criteria throughout the life of the installation, but they also influence energy use. As the light sources currently being specified continue to evolve, it is necessary to reevaluate the methods used in calculating light loss factors, as well as carefully consider the consequences of different product performance attributes. Because of the unique operating characteristics of LEDs and lack of a comprehensive lifetime rating—as well as the problematic relationship between lifetime and lumen maintenance—determining an appropriate lamp lumen depreciation (LLD) factor for LED products is difficult. As a result, a unique solution has been advocated: when quantity of light is an important design consideration, the IES recommends using an LLD of not greater than 0.70. This method deviates from the typical practice for conventional sources of using the ratio of mean to initial lumen output, and can misrepresent actual performance, increase energy use, and inhibit comparisons between products. This paper discusses the complications related to LLD and LEDs, compares the performance of conventional and LED products, and examines alternatives to a maximum LLD of 0.70 for LEDs.
Date: September 17, 2013
Creator: Royer, Michael P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

NREL Recommends Ways to Cut Building Energy Costs in Half (Fact Sheet)

Description: Building designers and operators could cut energy use by 50% in large office buildings, hospitals, schools, and a variety of stores -- including groceries, general merchandise outlets, and retail outlets -- by following the recommendations of NREL researchers. The innovative energy-saving recommendations are contained in technical support documents and Advanced Energy Design Guides compiled by NREL.
Date: August 1, 2013
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Performance House -- A Cold Climate Challenge Home

Description: Working with builder partners on a test homes allows for vetting of whole-house building strategies to eliminate any potential unintended consequences prior to implementing these solution packages on a production scale. To support this research, CARB partnered with Preferred Builders Inc. on a high-performance test home in Old Greenwich, CT. The philosophy and science behind the 2,700 ft2 'Performance House' was based on the premise that homes should be safe, healthy, comfortable, durable, efficient, and adapt with the homeowners. The technologies and strategies used in the 'Performance House' were not cutting-edge, but simply 'best practices practiced'. The focus was on simplicity in construction, maintenance, and operation. When seeking a 30% source energy savings targets over a comparable 2009 IECC code-built home in the cold climate zone, nearly all components of a home must be optimized. Careful planning and design are critical. To help builders and architects seeking to match the performance of this home, a step-by-step guide through the building shell components of DOE's Challenge Home are provided in a pictorial story book. The end result was a DOE Challenge Home that achieved a HERS Index Score of 20 (43 without PV, the minimum target was 55 for compliance). This home was also awarded the 2012 HOBI for Best Green Energy Efficient Home from the Home Builders & Remodelers Association of Connecticut.
Date: August 1, 2013
Creator: Puttagunta, S.; Grab, J. & Williamson, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Imagine Homes New Construction Occupied Test House

Description: This report summarizes the research findings of a long-term monitoring plan to evaluate the performance of an energy-efficient home constructed in 2010 in San Antonio, Texas. Monitoring of the energy use, energy generation, and temperature conditions for this project occurred between July 2010 and October 2011. The heating, ventilation, and air conditioning system effectively maintained acceptable temperatures and humidity levels in peak cooling and heating and non-peak operating periods. Discrepancies were found between modeled and actual energy use values, with actual space cooling energy use closest to the corresponding modeled value. Energy consumption predicted for lighting, appliances, and miscellaneous electrical loads was significantly higher than measured amounts, and energy consumption predicted for cooling was significantly lower than measured amounts. A high amount of the 1,600 kWh of PV-generated electricity produced annually was sent to the electric grid every month. The solar thermal DHW system was the main source of hot water for most of the year and performed well; during summer, electrical use by the backup system was rare.
Date: July 1, 2013
Creator: Stecher, D.; Rapport, A. & Allison, K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode Parking Structure Lighting at U.S. Department of Labor Headquarters

Description: This report documents a solid-state lighting (SSL) technology demonstration at the parking structure of the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) Headquarters in Washington, DC, in which light-emitting diode (LED) luminaires were substituted for the incumbent high-pressure sodium (HPS) luminaires and evaluated for relative light quantity and performance. The demonstration results show energy savings of 52% from the initial conversion of HPS to the LED product. These savings were increased to 88% by using occupancy sensor controls that were ultimately set to reduce power to 10% of high state operation after a time delay of 2.5 minutes. Because of the relatively high cost of the LED luminaires at their time of purchase for this project (2010), the simple payback periods were 6.5 years and 4.9 years for retrofit and new construction scenarios, respectively. Staff at DOL Headquarters reported high satisfaction with the operation of the LED product.
Date: March 1, 2013
Creator: Kinzey, Bruce R. & Myer, Michael
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Use of Occupancy Sensors in LED Parking Lot and Garage Applications: Early Experiences

Description: Occupancy sensor systems are gaining traction as an effective technological approach to reducing energy use in exterior commercial lighting applications. Done correctly, occupancy sensors can substantially enhance the savings from an already efficient lighting system. However, this technology is confronted by several potential challenges and pitfalls that can leave a significant amount of the prospective savings on the table. This report describes anecdotal experiences from field installations of occupancy sensor controlled light-emitting diode (LED) lighting at two parking structures and two parking lots. The relative levels of success at these installations reflect a marked range of potential outcomes: from an additional 76% in energy savings to virtually no additional savings. Several issues that influenced savings were encountered in these early stage installations and are detailed in the report. Ultimately, care must be taken in the design, selection, and commissioning of a sensor-controlled lighting installation, else the only guaranteed result may be its cost.
Date: November 7, 2012
Creator: Kinzey, Bruce R.; Myer, Michael; Royer, Michael P. & Sullivan, Greg P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Achieving Very High Efficiency and Net Zero Energy in an Existing Home in a Hot-Humid Climate: Long-Term Utility and Monitoring Data (Revised)

Description: This study summarizes the first six months of detailed data collected on a single family home that experienced a series of retrofits targeting reductions in energy use. The project was designed to develop data on how envelope modifications and renewable measures can result in considerable energy reductions and potentially net zero energy for an existing home. Originally published in February 2012, this revised version of the report contains further research conducted on the Parker residence. Key updates include one full year of additional data, an analysis of cooling performance of the mini-split heat pump, an evaluation of room-to-room temperature distribution, and an evaluation of plug-in automobile charging performance, electricity consumption, and load shape.
Date: October 1, 2012
Creator: Parker, D. & Sherwin, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Post-Top Lighting at Central Park in New York City

Description: A review of five post-top light-emitting diode (LED) pedestrian luminaires installed in New York City's Central Park for possible replacement to the existing metal halide post-top luminaire. This report reviews the energy savings potential and lighting delivered by the LED post-top luminaires.
Date: September 30, 2012
Creator: Myer, Michael; Goettel, Russell T. & Kinzey, Bruce R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Assessing and Reducing Miscellaneous Electric Loads (MELs) in Banks

Description: Miscellaneous electric loads (MELs) are loads outside of a building's core functions of heating, ventilating, air conditioning, lighting, and water heating. MELs are a large percentage of total building energy loads. This report reviews methods for reducing MELs in Banks. Reducing MELs in a bank setting requires both local and corporate action. Corporate action centers on activities to prioritize and allocate the right resources to correct procurement and central control issues. Local action includes branch assessment or audits to identify specific loads and needs. The worksheet at the end of this guide can help with cataloging needed information and estimating savings potential. The following steps provide a guide to MEL reductions in Bank Branches. The general process has been adapted from a process developed for office buildings the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL, 2011).
Date: September 1, 2012
Creator: Rauch, Emily M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Demonstration Assessment of LED Roadway Lighting: Philadelphia, PA

Description: For this demonstration assessment, 10 different groups of LED luminaires were installed at three sites in Philadelphia, PA. Each of the three sites represented a different set of conditions, most importantly with regard to the incumbent HPS luminaires, which were nominally 100 W, 150 W, and 250 W. The performance of each product was evaluated based on manufacturer data, illuminance calculations, field measurements of illuminance, and the subjective impressions of both regular and expert observers.
Date: September 1, 2012
Creator: Royer, Michael P.; Tuenge, Jason R. & Poplawski, Michael E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Lumen Maintenance Testing of the Philips 60-Watt Replacement Lamp L Prize Entry

Description: This paper describes testing conducted to evaluate the Philips' L Prize award winning 60-watt LED replacement product's ability to meet the lifetime/lumen maintenance requirement of the competition, which was: "having 70 percent of the lumen value under subparagraph (A) [producing a luminous flux greater than 900 lumens] exceeding 25,000 hours under typical conditions expected in residential use." A custom test apparatus was designed and constructed for this testing and a statistical approach was developed for use in evaluating the test results. This will be the only publicly available, third-party data set of long-term LED product operation.
Date: September 1, 2012
Creator: Gordon, Kelly L.; Hafen, Ryan P.; Hathaway, John E. & McCullough, Jeffrey J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Technical Feasibility Assessment of LED Roadway Lighting on the Golden Gate Bridge

Description: Subsequent to preliminary investigations by the Golden Gate Bridge Highway & Transportation District (GGB), in coordination with Pacific Gas & Electric (PG&E), the GATEWAY Demonstration program was asked to evaluate the technical feasibility of replacing existing roadway lighting on the bridge with products utilizing LED technology. GGB and PG&E also indicated interest in induction (i.e., electrodeless fluorescent) technology, since both light source types feature rated lifetimes significantly exceeding those of the existing high-pressure sodium (HPS) and low-pressure sodium (LPS) products. The goal of the study was to identify any solutions which would reduce energy use and maintenance without compromising the quantity or quality of existing illumination. Products used for roadway lighting on the historic bridge must be installed within the existing amber-lensed shoebox-style luminaire housings. It was determined that induction technology does not appear to represent a viable alternative for the roadway luminaires in this application; any energy savings would be attributable to a reduction in light levels. Although no suitable LED retrofit kits were identified for installation within existing luminaire housings, several complete LED luminaires were found to offer energy savings of 6-18%, suggesting custom LED retrofit kits could be developed to match or exceed the performance of the existing shoeboxes. Luminaires utilizing ceramic metal halide (CMH) were also evaluated, and some were found to offer 28% energy savings, but these products might actually increase maintenance due to the shorter rated lamp life. Plasma technology was evaluated, as well, but no suitable products were identified. Analysis provided in this report was completed in May 2012. Although LED technologies are expected to become increasingly viable over time, and product mock-ups may reveal near-term solutions, some options not currently considered by GGB may ultimately merit evaluation. For example, it would be preferable in terms of performance to simply replace existing luminaires ...
Date: September 1, 2012
Creator: Tuenge, Jason R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Demonstration Assessment of LED Roadway Lighting: NE Cully Boulevard Portland, OR

Description: A new roadway lighting demonstration project was initiated in late 2010, which was planned in conjunction with other upgrades to NE Cully Boulevard, a residential collector road in the northeast area of Portland, OR. With the NE Cully Boulevard project, the Portland Bureau of Transportation hoped to demonstrate different light source technologies and different luminaires side-by-side. This report documents the initial performance of six different newly installed luminaires, including three LED products, one induction product, one ceramic metal halide product, and one high-pressure sodium (HPS) product that represented the baseline solution. It includes reported, calculated, and measured performance; evaluates the economic feasibility of each of the alternative luminaires; and documents user feedback collected from a group of local Illuminating Engineering Society (IES) members that toured the site. This report does not contain any long-term performance evaluations or laboratory measurements of luminaire performance. Although not all of the installed products performed equally, the alternative luminaires generally offered higher efficacy, more appropriate luminous intensity distributions, and favorable color quality when compared to the baseline HPS luminaire. However, some products did not provide sufficient illumination to all areas—vehicular drive lanes, bicycle lanes, and sidewalks—or would likely fail to meet design criteria over the life of the installation due to expected depreciation in lumen output. While the overall performance of the alternative luminaires was generally better than the baseline HPS luminaire, cost remains a significant barrier to widespread adoption. Based on the cost of the small quantity of luminaires purchased for this demonstration, the shortest calculated payback period for one of the alternative luminaire types was 17.3 years. The luminaire prices were notably higher than typical prices for currently available luminaires purchased in larger quantities. At prices that are more typical, the payback would be less than 10 years. In addition to the demonstration ...
Date: June 29, 2012
Creator: Royer, Michael P.; Poplawski, Michael E. & Tuenge, Jason R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department