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Carbon-14 Bomb Pulse Dating

Description: Abstract: Atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons during the 1950s and early 1960s doubled the concentration of carbon-14 in the atmosphere and created a pulse that labeled everything alive since 1955 as carbon moved up the food chain. The variation in carbon-14 concentration in time is well-documented and can be used to chronologically date all biological materials since the mid-1950s.
Date: June 15, 2012
Creator: Buchholz, Bruce A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Radiocarbon Dating

Description: Abstract: Radiocarbon dating can be used to determine the age of objects that contain components that were once alive. In the case of human remains, a radiocarbon date can distinguish between a crime scene and an archaeological site. Documents, museum artifacts and art objects can be dated to determine if their age is correct for the historical context. A radiocarbon date does not confirm authenticity, but it can help identify a forgery.
Date: May 25, 2012
Creator: Buchholz, Bruce A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department