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Commentary on Keith Augustine's Article

Description: Abstract: This commentary responds to Keith Augustine's article on the hallucinatory nature of near-death experiences (NDEs). It draws attention to his misreading of an important point made in my book Religion, Spirituality and the Near-Death Experience (Fox, 2003) regarding claims made by some NDErs to have traveled into outer space, reinforces the need for a thorough consideration of the epistemological complexities involved in asserting or denying a "common core" to NDEs, and ends by supporting the point made by Augustine that there is a pressing need for more crosscultural studies of the "core" phenomenon itself.
Date: Winter 2007
Creator: Fox, Mark
Partner: UNT Libraries

Commentary on Keith Augustine's Paper

Description: Abstract: Keith Augustine has provided a useful survey of the psychological and neurological correlates of near-death experiences and out-of-body experiences. The empirical findings he cites may prove awkward to accommodate under current separationist accounts of these experiences, although proponents of the separationist approach may be able to refine their theories so as to enhance their predictive power in this regard.
Date: Winter 2007
Creator: Irwin, Harvey J.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Commentary on "Psychophysiological and Cultural Correlates Undermining a Survivalist Interpretation of Near-Death Experiences"

Description: Abstract: Keith Augustine has provided a legitimate and cogent critique of a transcendental interpretation of near-death experiences, exposing weaknesses in the research methodology, paucity of the data, and gaps in the arguments. He offers evidence from psychophysiological and cultural correlates of NDEs that he interprets as favoring a hallucinatory understanding of these phenomena. however, his analysis relies on idiosyncratic definitions of psychological concepts, reads unidirectional causality into bivariate correlations, and underestimates the empirical predictions of the separation hypothesis. Despite less than compelling evidence for the transcendental hypothesis, it accounts for NDE phenomenology better than the materialist model.
Date: Winter 2007
Creator: Greyson, Bruce
Partner: UNT Libraries

Culture and the Near-Death Experience: Comments on Keith Augustine's "Psychophysiological and Cultural Correlates Undermining a Survivalist Interpretation of Near-Death Experiences"

Description: Abstract: This paper is a sociological commentary on the leading paper by Keith Augustine. It discusses the relationship between social expectations and culture as well as extending the discussion about the possibility that near-death experiences may not be a singular entity. I suggest there are sound grounds for developing a typology of experiences that have different and or overlapping causes and phenomenology.
Date: Winter 2007
Creator: Kellehear, Allan
Partner: UNT Libraries

Journal of Near-Death Studies, Volume 26, Number 2, Winter 2007

Description: Quarterly journal publishing papers related to near-death experiences, including research reports; theoretical or conceptual statements; expressions of a scientific, philosophic, religious, or historical perspective on the study of near-death experiences; cross-cultural studies; individual case histories; and personal accounts of experiences or related phenomena.
Date: Winter 2007
Creator: Greyson, Bruce
Partner: UNT Libraries

Psychophysiological and Cultural Correlates Undermining a Survivalist Interpretation of Near-Death Experiences

Description: Paper, Part III of a critique of survivalist interpretations of near-death experiences (NDEs), which considers psychophysiological and cultural correlates of NDEs suggesting that such experiences are solely products of individuals' minds rather than windows into a transcendental realm.
Date: Winter 2007
Creator: Augustine, Keith
Partner: UNT Libraries

"Psychophysiological and Cultural Correlates Undermining a Survivalist Interpretation of Near-Death Experiences" Defended

Description: Article responding to objections raised against another article. The author concedes some of the objections up to a point, but concludes that they neither strengthen the case for a survivalist interpretation of near-death experiences, nor weaken the case against one.
Date: Winter 2007
Creator: Augustine, Keith
Partner: UNT Libraries