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Journal of Near-Death Studies, Volume 19, Number 3, Spring 2001

Description: Quarterly journal publishing papers related to near-death experiences, including research reports; theoretical or conceptual statements; expressions of a scientific, philosophic, religious, or historical perspective on the study of near-death experiences; cross-cultural studies; individual case histories; and personal accounts of experiences or related phenomena.
Date: Spring 2001
Creator: Greyson, Bruce
Partner: UNT Libraries

Letter to the Editor

Description: Letter written to the editor of the Journal of Near-Death Studies on the topic of progress in the field of NDE research and spirituality.
Date: Spring 2001
Creator: Whitfield, Barbara Harris
Partner: UNT Libraries

Letters to the Editor

Description: Eight letters written to the editor of the Journal of Near-Death Studies on the following topics: "More on Psychomanteum Experimentation," a response by Beverly Brodsky, "EMDR, ADCs, NDEs, and the Resolution of Loss," a response by Allan Botkin, and "Religious Wars in the NDE Movement."
Date: Spring 2001
Creator: Willis-Brandon, Carla; Brodsky, Beverly; Horacek, Bruce J.; Botkin, Allan L.; Wade, Jenny; Rhodes, Leon S. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries

A "Little Death": The Near-Death Experience and Tibetan Delogs

Description: Article exploring a phenomenon remarkably like the near-death experience that has been uncovered in Tibetan culture. Anthropologists have gathered accounts of contemporary and historical cases of remarkable people called delogs. Seemingly dead for several hours or days, these people revive spontaneously and tell detailed accounts of otherworldly journeys. These delogs are a bridge between contemporary near-death experiences and ancient shamanic practices.
Date: Spring 2001
Creator: Bailey, Lee W.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Near-Death Experiences in Thailand

Description: Study examining near-death experiences (NDEs) in Thailand, which do not demonstrate the episodes most noted in those collected in the West, but they do show consistent features. The article argues that these features, including harbingers of death, visions of hell, the Lord of the underworld, and the benefits of making donations to Buddhist monks and temples, can be understood within the framework of beliefs and customs unique to Southeast Asia.
Date: Spring 2001
Creator: Murphy, Todd
Partner: UNT Libraries