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Geology of the Sumdum Copper-Zinc Prospect, Southeastern Alaska

Description: From abstract: The Sumdum copper-zinc prospect is in an alpine region on the mainland of southeastern Alaska, about 50 miles southeast of Juneau and about 25 miles west of the Canadian boundary. The ore-bearing outcrops at the prospect were discovered by the Alaska Helicopter Syndicate during the summer of 1958. The prospect is within a few thousand feet of the western margin of the . Coast Range batholith in regionally metamorphosed rocks that locally -have -been contact: metamorphosed. Most of the known ore deposits are -in the intermediate unit of three metamorphic-rock units that were mapped.
Date: 1964
Creator: MacKevett, E. M., Jr. & Blake, M. Clark, Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Geology of the Freshwater Bay Area, Chichagof Island, Alaska

Description: From abstract: The Freshwater Bay area comprises about 140 square miles in the northeastern part of Chichagof Island, southeastern Alaska. A sequence of Paleozoic rocks more than 24,000 feet thick is divided into 5 formations, 4 of which are named for the first time.
Date: 1963
Creator: Loney, Robert Ahlberg; Condon, William H. & Dutro, J. Thomas, Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Geology of the North Bradfield River Iron Prospect, Southeastern Alaska

Description: From abstract: The North Bradfield River iron prospect is in southeastern Alaska in rugged terrain about 8 miles southwest of the Canadian boundary and about 15 miles northeast of the head of Bradfield Canal. The prospect includes several magnetite-rich ore bodies of pyrometasomatic origin that are localized in skarn. The skarn forms a small part of a northwestward-trending roof pendant that is enclosed in the composite Coast Range batholith. The dominant rocks of the roof pendant are gneiss, granulite, schist, and marble. The ore, which consists almost entirely of magnetite, contains subordinate amounts of hematite, hydrous iron sesquioxides, pyrrhotite, chalcopyrite, and malachite. The ore bodies are crudely stratiform and apparently discontinuous. The largest ore body exposed is traceable for about 350 feet along its strike and averages about 25 feet in thickness. An accurate appraisal of the economic potential of the prospect was precluded by poor outcrops, local snow cover, and inadequate subsurface data.
Date: 1963
Creator: MacKevett, E. M., Jr. & Blake, M. Clark, Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Geology of the Craig Quadrangle, Alaska

Description: From abstract: The Craig quadrangle, in southeastern Alaska, lies entirely within the Tongass National Forest and includes a large part of Prince of Wales Island, the largest island of the Alexander Archipelago. Sedimentary, volcanic, and metamorphic rocks of Paleozoic and Mesozoic age are exposed as complexly folded and faulted sequences. Paleozoic rocks occupy a broad geanticlinal area comprising Prince of Wales Island and the islands to the west. Metamorphosed Mesozoic rocks form a geosynclinal area along and east of Clarence Strait. Granitic and dioritic stocks and masses, mainly of Mesozoic age, intrude the Paleozoic and Mesozoic rocks. Remnants of volcanic rocks of Tertiary age exist on Suemez Island, and scattered areas of Tertiary clastic rocks and volcanic rocks are exposed near Clarence Strait. Deposits of Quaternary age are mainly thin glacial deposits and narrow bands of stream alluvium.
Date: 1961
Creator: Condon, W. H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Geology of the Mount McKinley Quadrangle, Alaska

Description: From abstract: The Mount McKinley quadrangle, in south-central Alaska, includes parts of the Alaska Range, the Tanana and Kuskokwim lowlands, and the Kuskokwim Mountains. Schists of Precambrian age crop out in the northern foothills of the Alaska Range. Sedimentary and volcanic rocks of Paleozoic and Mesozoic age are exposed in the Kuskokwim Mountains, where little is known of their distribution and character, and in the Alaska Range, where they occupy the axial part and northern limb of a great synclinorium. Granitic batholiths, largely of Mesozoic age, intrude the Paleozoic and Mesozoic rocks in the Alaska Range.
Date: 1961
Creator: Reed, John Calvin, Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Geologic Appraisal of Dimension-Stone Deposits

Description: From abstract: The construction stone industry comprises two major branches-dimension stone and crushed and broken stone. For purposes of geologic appraisal, deposits of these two categories should be treated separately, because they differ widely in use, mode of development, and exploitation. Deposits of dimension stones are subjected to much greater selectivity with respect to physical properties, uniformity, and modes of occurrence; these demand a much more critical and detailed study of geologic and mineralogic features.
Date: 1960
Creator: Currier, Louis W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Birth and Development of Parícutin Volcano, Mexico

Description: From introduction: In this report the authors have attempted to present a strictly factual account of the birth and development of Paricutin volcano and avoid any interpretive opinions that might break the true narrative of events.
Date: 1956
Creator: Foshag, William F. & González Reyna, Jenaro
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Radioactive Deposits in New Mexico

Description: From abstract: Forty-five areas of radioactivity in New Mexico had been investigated by government geologists or reported in the geologic literature before 1952. 21 areas contained visible uranium minerals and one contained thorium minerals. The occurrences were in the northwestern, north-central, central, southwestern, and southeastern parts of the State.
Date: 1956
Creator: Lovering, T. G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Uranium-Bearing Nickel-Cobalt-Native Silver Deposits, Black Hawk District, Grant County, New Mexico

Description: From abstract: The ore deposits are in fissue veins that contain silver, nickel, cobalt, and uranium minerals. The ore minerals, which include native silver, argentite, niccolite, millerite, skutterudite, nickel skutterudite, bismuthinite, pitchblende, and sphalerite, are in a carbonate gangue in narrow, persistent veins, most of which trend northeast. Pitchblende has been identified in the Black Hawk and the Alhambra deposits and unidentified radioactive minerals were found at five other localities. The deposits that contain the radioactive minerals constitute a belt 600 to 1,500 feet wide that trends about N. 450 E. and is approximately parallel to the southeastern boundary of the monzonite porphyry stock. All the major ore deposits are in the quartz diorite gneiss close to the monzonite porphyry. The ore deposits are similar to the deposits at Great Bear Lake, Canada, and Joachimsthal, Czechoslovakia.
Date: 1956
Creator: Gillerman, Elliot & Whitebread, Donald Harvey
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Carnotite-Bearing Sandstone in Cedar Canyon, Slim Buttes, Harding County, South Dakota

Description: From abstract: Carnotite-bearing sandstone and claystone have been found in the Chadron formation of the White River group of Oligocene age in the southern part of the Slim Buttes area, Harding County, S. Dak. The carnotite is an efflorescent yellow coating on lenticular silicified sandstone. Locally, the mineralized sandstone contains 0.23 percent uranium. The uranium and vanadium ions are believed to have been derived from the overlying mildly radioactive tuffaceous rocks of the Arikaree formation of Miocene age. Analyses of water from 26 springs issuing from the Chadron and Arikaree formations along the margins of Slim Buttes show uranium contents of as much as 200 parts per billion. Meteoric water percolating through tuffaceous rocks is thought to have brought uranium and other ions into environments in the Chadron formation that were physically and chemically favorable for the deposition of carnotite.
Date: 1955
Creator: Gill, James R. & Moore, George William
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Criteria for Outlining Areas Favorable for Uranium Deposits in Parts of Colorado and Utah

Description: Abstract: Most of the uranium deposits in the Uravan and Gateway mining districts are in the persistent upper sandstone stratum of the Salt Wash member of the Morrison formation. Areas in which this stratum is predominantly lenticular have been differentiated from areas in which the stratum is predominantly nonlenticular. The most favorable ground for uranium deposits is in areas of lenticular sandstone where the stratum is underlain by continuous altered greenish-gray mudstone. Ore is localized in scour-and-fill sandstone beds within favorable areas of lenticular sandstone. Regional control of the movement of ore-bearing solutions in the principal ore-bearing sandstone zone is indicated by belts of discontinuously altered mudstone transitional in a northerly and southerly direction from an area of unaltered mudstone to areas of continuously altered mudstone ; and an area of unaltered mudstone in which no ore deposits are found and an increase in size, number, and grade of ore deposits from areas of discontinuously altered to continuously altered mudstone. Discrete regional patterns of ore deposits and altered mudstone are associated with Tertiary structures; where these structures and favorable host rocks occur in juxtaposition, regional controls appear to have localized ore deposits.
Date: 1955
Creator: McKay, E. J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fluorspar Deposits in Western Kentucky: Part 1

Description: From introduction: The need for fluorspar in the manufacture of open-hearth steel, hydrofluoric acid, aluminum, certain insecticides, refrigerants and airconditioning compounds, welding rods, 100-octane gasoline, and many other products necessary to the prosecution of World War II resulted in unprecedented demands for this commodity. To help increase production to meet these demands, the War Production Board in 1942 asked the United States Geological Survey to plan a comprehensive study of the fluorspar deposits in the United States. This study has been carried on in many parts of the country in cooperation with geologists and engineers of State and Federal agencies and with local producers.
Date: 1955
Creator: Williams, James Steele; Duncan, Helen & Hardin, George C., Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Geochemical Relations of Zinc-Bearing Peat to the Lockport Dolomite, Orleans County, New York

Description: From introduction: Geochemical studies of zinc-bearing peats in western New York State show them to be related genetically to underlying mineralized beds of the Lockport dolomite of Niagaran age. (...) Intermittent field work was begun in the area by the United States Geological Survey in September 1946; after some interruptions, field work was completed in June 1948. In 1950, 1,900 feet of diamond drilling was completed in the area.
Date: 1955
Creator: Cannon, Helen L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Geology and Coal Deposits, Jarvis Creek Coal Field, Alaska

Description: From abstract: The Jarvis Creek coal field lies on the north side of the Alaska Range, between latitudes 63 35' and 63*45' N., and longitudes 145*40' and 145*50' W. It is 3 to 6 miles east of the Richardson Highway. The coal field is about 16 square miles in area, the major part of which is a rolling plateau that slopes gently northward and is bounded on the east, south. and west by bluffs facing Jarvis Creek, Ruby Creek, and the Delta River.
Date: 1955
Creator: Wahrhaftig, Clyde & Hickcox, C. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Geology of the Happy Jack Mine, White Canyon Area, San Juan County, Utah

Description: From abstract: The Happy Jack mine is in the White Canyon area, San Juan County, Utah. Production is from high-grade uranium deposits in the Shinarump conglomerate of Triassic age. The Shinarump strata range from 161/2 to 40 feet in thickness and the lower part of these beds fills an eastward-trending channel that is more than 750 feet wide and 10 feet deep.
Date: 1955
Creator: Trites, Albert F., Jr. & Chew, Randall T., III
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Pegmatites of the Crystal Mountain District, Larimer County, Colorado

Description: From abstract: The Front Range of Colorado is composed chiefly of schists of the Idaho Springs formation of pre-Cambrian age which have been intruded by a variety of granitic batholiths. In the Crystal Mountain district the Mount Olympus granite, a satellite of Fuller's Longs Peak batholith, forms sills and essentially concordant multiple intrusions in quartz-mica schist that dips southward at moderate to steep angles. A great number of pegmatites accompanied and followed the intrusion of the sills and formed concordant and discordant bodies in schist and granite.
Date: 1955
Creator: Thurston, William R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Uranium Deposits in Fall River County, South Dakota

Description: From abstract: In 1951 uranium deposits containing carnotite were discovered in the southern Black Hills near Edgemont, Fall River County, S. Dak. Many carnotite deposits have since been found in sandstones in the Inyan Kara group of Early Cretaceous age, and uranium-bearing material has been discovered in the Minnelusa sandstone of Pennsylvanian age and the Deadwood formation of Cambrian age in the southern Black Hills. Ore has been produced only from the Inyan Kara group, mostly within an area of about 30 square miles along the southwest flank of the Black Hills uplift between Dewey and Hot Springs, in Custer and Fall River Counties. In addition, occurrences of uranium in other parts of the Black Hills and the surrounding area are known or reported in sedimentary, igneous, and metamorphic rocks of pre-Cambrian to Tertiary age.
Date: 1955
Creator: Bell, Henry & Bales, W. E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Effect of Permafrost on Cultivated Fields, Fairbanks Area, Alaska

Description: From introduction: This report describes the destructive effect of permafrost on cultivated fields and delineates the parts of the Fairbanks area which are least suitable for agriculture because of the character of the underlying permafrost. Studies by the author indicate that agriculture will be affected by similar permafrost conditions throughout areas on the north side of the Tanana Valley within 100 miles of Fairbanks.
Date: 1954
Creator: Péwé, Troy Lewis
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fluorspar Deposits in Western Kentucky: Part 2

Description: From abstract: The central part of the Commodore fault system is in the western Kentucky fluorspar district, in Crittenden County, about 6 miles northwest of Marion. It has yielded from 30,000 to 40,000 tons of crude fluorspar and nearly 20,000 tons of zinc ore. Limestones, sandstones, and shales of the Meramec, Chester, and Pottsville groups of Carboniferous age crop out as relatively flat-lying beds, except near faults. The rocks are transected by high-angle normal faults. The main faulted zone is the Commodore fault system, which displaces the beds from 1,500 to 2,000 feet. The principal vein minerals are fluorite, calcite, smithsonite, sphalerite, and galena. Fluorite and smithsonite are the chief ore minerals, occurring as lenses along the faults. The mines have been worked since 1892, but most of the workings are caved or filled with water.
Date: 1954
Creator: Trace, Robert D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fluorspar Deposits in Western Kentucky: Part 3

Description: Abstract: The Moore Hill fault system in the central part of the Kentucky-Illinois fluorspar field is about 26 miles long. Fluorspar has been produced from a part nearly 5 miles long, and since mining began in 1899 this system has yielded more than 300,000 tons of fluorspar. Lead and zinc sulfides commonly are found in the ore, but only rarely do they occur in sufficient quantity to be worth recovering. The productive part of the fault system was mapped and the properties and principal mines described. The high-angle normal faults of the system cut limestones, sandstones, and shales of Mississippian age. Stratigraphic displacements range from less than a foot to as much as 550 feet. The fluorspar bodies are sporadically distributed in veins of calcite and fluorite along the faults.
Date: 1954
Creator: Thurston, William R.; Hardin, George C., Jr. & Klepser, Harry J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Geology and Oil Resources of the Jonesville District, Lee County, Virginia

Description: From abstract: The Jonesville district is in central Lee County in the extreme southwest corner of Virginia. It includes an area that is 25 miles long from northeast to southwest and averages 6 miles in width. Most of the district lies within a broad lowland named the Powell Valley, but the district includes Wallen Ridge, which bounds Powell Valley on the southeast.
Date: 1954
Creator: Miller, Ralph L. & Brosgé, William Peters
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Geology of the Prince William Sound Region, Alaska

Description: From introduction: This paper describes the geology of the Prince William Sound region, a part of south-central Alaska. It deals with the rocks of a section of the Coast Ranges that has been studied by various geologists over a period of many years and still offers basic problems that are unsolved. Prince William Sound is well known for its mining activities, but the intention here is to describe the areal and stratigraphic geology of the district rather than its mineral resources and to present a statement that will serve as a report of progress and a basis for more detailed field work.
Date: 1954
Creator: Moffit, Fred H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department