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Book Review: What is it Like to be Dead? Near-Death Experiences, Christianity, and the Occult

Description: Review of a book titled "What is it Like to be Dead? Near-Death Experiences, Christianity, and the Occult" written by Jens Schlieter, which discusses near-death experiences in Western Christian and occult traditions between 1580 and 1975. The review discusses Schlieter's methodology and conclusions.
Date: Summer 2020
Creator: Shushan, Gregory
Partner: UNT Libraries

Coping with Cancer: Case Studies on the Effects of Learning About Near-Death Experiences

Description: Abstract: People diagnosed with cancer frequently report deleterious psychological experiences because of their diagnosis and subsequent medical treatment. One particularly helpful coping strategy reported by cancer patients is psychoeducational on spiritual topics. Anecdotally, cancer survivors reported that psychoeducation about near-death experiences (NDEs) has been a source of great comfort. In this article, we present two case studies on cancer survivors who reported that learning about NDEs helped them cope with cancer successfully by enabling them to face with greater peace both ongoing medical treatment and a potential for death.
Date: Summer 2020
Creator: Foster, Ryan D.; Maxwell, Lauren & Butler, William E.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Editor's Foreword [Summer 2020]

Description: Editorial statement introducing the contents of the journal issue and providing other relevant notes. This issue's articles focus on gaining deeper understandings of currently accepted research about near-death experiences.
Date: Summer 2020
Creator: Holden, Janice Miner
Partner: UNT Libraries

Subjective Sleep Quality After a Near-Death Experience

Description: Abstract: Findings from several studies suggest near-death experiences (NDEs) may influence sleep quality. In this study, we examined self-reported duration, latency, and quality of sleep in those who had experienced a life-threatening event and who had and had not reported an associated NDE. Participants were 154 members of the general New Zealand population who completed an online quantitative questionnaire that included the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, Near-Death Experience Scale, Impact of Event Scale-Revised, and Life Changes Inventory-Revised. Both the NDE and non-NDE groups indicated sleep habits had changed after their close encounter with death. Participants slept less, took longer to fall asleep, and experienced more sleep disturbances. However, we found no differences between the groups, suggesting sleep alterations occurred in response to the near-death event rather than specifically to the NDE.
Date: Summer 2020
Creator: Lindsay, Nicole & Tassell-Matamua, Natasha
Partner: UNT Libraries

Book Review: Moral development & reality: Beyond the theories of Kholberg, Hoffman, and Haidt (4th ed.)

Description: Review of a book titled "Moral development & reality: Beyond the theories of Kohlberg, Hoffman and Haidt," written by John C. Gibbs, a professor of developmental psychology. This book explores theories of promoting prosocial behavior and morals in at-risk and delinquent youth, and addresses the theories of Jonathan Haidt, Lawrence Kohlberg, and Martin Hoffman regarding moral development.
Date: Spring 2020
Creator: Wade, Jenny
Partner: UNT Libraries

Editor's Foreword [Spring 2020]

Description: Editorial statement introducing the contents of the journal issue and providing other relevant notes. This issue includes articles that examine empirical data related to near-death experiences.
Date: Spring 2020
Creator: Holden, Janice Miner
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Mystical Experience and Its Neural Correlates

Description: Abstract: Despite their different etiologies, three types of spiritually transformative experiences (STEs)--near-death experiences, psilocybin experiences, and meditative experiences of cosmic consciousness--appear to have attributes that are common to a broad range of mystical experiences, including an experience of expanded awareness. In addition, all three appear to be associated with profound and lasting transformations in the lives of experiencers. Finally, these three experiences appear to share some common neural correlates. In this article, we discuss similarities in case studies of these STEs, in data from controlled clinical research studies on their transformative effects, as well as from neurophysiological data correlated with the occurrence of STEs themselves. In all three STEs, research shows a reduction in neural activity in the major centers of the brain, including the Default Mode Network, the foundation of egoic stories involving the narrative related to oneself and the world in which one lives. It is proposed that during these STEs, reduced neural activity in areas of the brain that normally act as a filter or reducing valve mechanism opens the capacity to expanded awareness, which is associated with lasting transformation in the lives of experiencers.
Date: Spring 2020
Creator: Woollacott, Marjorie & Shumway-Cook, Anne
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Significance of Autoscopies as a Time Marker for the Occurrence of Near-Death Experiences

Description: Abstract: The physiological and psychological underpinnings of near-death experiences (NDEs) are not yet understood. In this article, we show that for "critical" NDEs reported after cardiac arrest, two different neurophysiological models have been proposed that, in the literature so far, have not been adequately distinguished from each other. In the real-time model, it is postulated that during critical NDEs, residual activities in the cerebrum were sufficient to generate NDEs in real time. In the reconstruction model, it is assumed that due to severe oxygen deficiency, critical NDEs could not have occurred at the time in question but were reconstructed later during the regeneration phase of the brain. To assess the plausibility of these two models, we analyzed the phenomenology of the view of one's own body from above (autoscopy) that frequently occurs in the beginnings of NDEs. In addition to the available literature, we used original descriptions of autoscopies obtained in an online survey conducted in 2015. We found that the reconstruction model is not supported by empirical findings and that some findings even speak against it. We therefore conclude that future discussions of explanatory models of NDEs should focus primarily on the neurophysiological real-time model and a third alternative according to which autoscopies and NDEs occur in relative independence from the prevailing neurophysiological processes in the brain.
Date: Spring 2020
Creator: Nahm, Michael & Weibel, Adrian
Partner: UNT Libraries

Editor's Afterword

Description: Editorial statement discussing the contents of the Journal of Near-Death Studies volume 37. The statement expands on the the article by Alexis P. Malozemoff and Jack A. Mroczkowski which discussed quantum physics and consciousness.
Date: Autumn 2019
Creator: Holden, Janice Miner
Partner: UNT Libraries

An Exploratory Study of Perceptual and Cognitive Features in Near-Death Experiences: A Proposed Model and Research Recommendations

Description: Abstract: This exploratory study was based on the cognitive and perceptual characteristics of 50 cases of near-death experiences (NDEs) collected through the International Association for Near-Death Studies-France. This study resulted in the formulation of a model of perception based on the concept of "global perception" or "global acquisition of information." Further analysis showed that this model is consistent with the concept that these perceptions are not purely hallucinatory but are, in part, modified perceptions of reality. Several clues are then proposed to explain how this type of information could be processed at the cerebral level and beyond. Finally, we offer a clinical research protocol, including a test that could lead to irrefutable proof of veridical perception during NDEs.
Date: Summer 2019
Creator: Jourdan, Jean-Pierre & Smythies, John
Partner: UNT Libraries

Letter to the Editor: Response to James Matlock's Rejoinder, Regarding His Review of Near-Death Experience in Indigenous Religions by Gregory Shushan

Description: Letter written to the editor of the Journal of Near-Death Studies providing a commentary from the author of the book, Near-Death Experience in Indigenous Religions, regarding a review of the book and multiple critiques and responses between the book's author and the reviewer.
Date: Summer 2019
Creator: Shushan, Gregory
Partner: UNT Libraries

Don't Look at My Hand: A Response to "Quantum Misuse in Psychic Literature"

Description: Abstract: In this invited response to the article "Quantum Misuse in Psychic Literature" by Jack A. Mroczkowski and Alexis P. Malozemoff, appearing in this issue of the Journal of Near-Death Studies, I agree that the term "quantum" can be misused if it is used as an explanation for psychic phenomena. What quantum mechanics does provide, whereas classical mechanics does not, is evidence that the physical world is compatible with psychic phenomena. That is, the core mystery about psychic experiences is that they transcend the everyday constraints of space and time. The same mystery is true of quantum phenomena. Some authors claim that this shared mystery is a mere coincidence. If so, that is an astonishing coincidence.
Date: Spring 2019
Creator: Radin, Dean
Partner: UNT Libraries

Misuse or Breakthrough? Mind and the Quantum Model: A Reponse to "Quantum Misuse in Psychic Literature"

Description: Abstract: The classic problem of how the mind and body relate, which is part of the general problem of how the physical universe may have given rise to consciousness, cannot be solved with a purely physical approach. In an attempt to locate a region of nature where mind and matter closely meet, many theorists both in and out of physics have looked to the quantum field. In their article "The Misuse of Quantum Physics in Psychic Literature" that appears elsewhere in this Journal issue, Jack A. Mroczkowski and Alexis P. Malozemoff proffered the accusation that these theorists engaged in "psychic" speculation, a misuse of quantum mechanics, and a misappropriate of science to further a spiritual agenda. In this invited response, I argue that the use of quantum in this way is entirely correct and suggests a radical paradigm shift.
Date: Spring 2019
Creator: Chopra, Deepak
Partner: UNT Libraries
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