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Advanced Oil Recovery Technologies for Improved Recovery From Slope Basin Clastic Reservoirs, Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool, Eddy County, Nm

Description: The overall objective of this project is to demonstrate that a development program based on advanced reservoir management methods can significantly improve oil recovery at the Nash Draw Pool (NDP). The plan includes developing a control area using standard reservoir management techniques and comparing its performance to an area developed using advanced reservoir management methods. Specific goals are (1) to demonstrate that an advanced development drilling and pressure maintenance program can significantly improve oil recovery compared to existing technology applications and (2) to transfer these advanced methodologies to oil and gas producers in the Permian Basin and elsewhere throughout the U.S. oil and gas industry.
Date: December 31, 2002
Creator: Murphy, Mark B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

CALLA ENERGY BIOMASS COFIRING PROJECT

Description: The Calla Energy Biomass Project, to be located in Estill County, Kentucky is to be conducted in two phases. The objective of Phase I is to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of cofiring biomass-based gasification fuel-gas in a power generation boiler. Waste coal fines are to be evaluated as the cofired fuel. The project is based on the use of commercially available technology for feeding and gas cleanup that would be suitable for deployment in municipal, large industrial and utility applications. Define a combustion system for the biomass gasification-based fuel-gas capable of stable, low-NOx combustion over the full range of gaseous fuel mixtures, with low carbon monoxide emissions and turndown capabilities suitable for large-scale power generation applications. The objective for Phase II is to design, install and demonstrate the combined gasification and combustion system in a large-scale, long-term cofiring operation to promote acceptance and utilization of indirect biomass cofiring technology for large-scale power generation applications. GTI received supplemental authorization A002 from DOE for additional work to be performed under Phase I that will further extend the performance period until the end of February 2003. The additional scope of work is for GTI to develop the gasification characteristics of selected feedstock for the project. To conduct this work, GTI assembles an existing ''mini-bench'' unit to perform the gasification tests. The results of the test will be used to confirm or if necessary update the process design completed in Phase Task 1. During this Performance Period work efforts focused on conducting tests of biomass feedstock samples on the 2 inch mini-bench gasifier.
Date: December 31, 2002
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A CAVITY RING-DOWN SPECTROSCOPY MERCURY CONTINUOUS EMISSION MONITOR

Description: SRD tested a number of different length cavities during this past quarter. Continuous transmission was observed with cavity lengths from 65 to 12 cm. The 65 cm cavity was replaced with a 39 cm cavity for work performed during this quarter. Flue gas components were tested for background absorptions and any interference with the determination of accurate mercury concentrations. Sulfur dioxide was found to absorb fairly strongly in the region of the mercury transition, but the Cavity Ring-Down (CRD) instrument was still able to detect mercury at subparts-per-billion by volume (ppb) levels. Additional flue gases tested included H{sub 2}O, CO, CO{sub 2}, NO, NO{sub 2}. None of these flue gas constituents showed any observable absorption in the ultraviolet region near the atomic mercury transition. Work was also initiated in speciation studies. In particular mercury chloride (HgCl{sub 2}) was tested. A mercury signal was detected from a gas stream containing HgCl{sub 2}. SRD was not able to determine definitively if there exists a spectral shift great enough to separate HgCl{sub 2} from elemental mercury in these initial tests.
Date: December 31, 2002
Creator: Carter, Christopher C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

CHARACTERIZATION OF IN-SITU STRESS AND PERMEABILITY IN FRACTURED RESERVOIRS

Description: We have extended a three-dimensional finite difference elastic wave propagation model previously developed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Earth Resources Laboratory (ERL) for modeling and analyzing the effect of fractures on seismic waves. The code has been translated into C language and parallelized [using message passing interface (MPI)] to allow for larger models to be run on Linux PC computer clusters. We have also obtained another 3-D code from Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, which we will use for verification of our ERL code results and also to run discrete fracture models. Testing of both codes is underway. We are working on a new finite difference model of borehole wave propagation for stressed formations. This code includes coordinate stretching to provide stable, variable grid sizes that will allow us to model the thin fluid annulus layers in borehole problems, especially for acoustic logging while drilling (LWD) applications. We are also extending our analysis routines for the inversion of flexural wave dispersion measurements for in situ stress estimates. Initial results on synthetic and limited field data are promising for a method to invert cross dipole data for the rotation angle and stress state simultaneously. A meeting is being scheduled between MIT and Shell Oil Company scientists to look at data from a fractured carbonate reservoir that may be made available to the project. The Focus/Disco seismic processing system from Paradigm Geophysical has been installed at ERL for field data analysis and as a platform for new analysis modules. We have begun to evaluate the flow properties of discrete fracture distributions through a simple 2D numerical model. Initial results illustrate how fluid flow pathways are very sensitive to variations in the geometry and apertures of fracture network.
Date: December 31, 2002
Creator: Burns, Daniel R. & Toksoz, M. Nafi
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

China-U.S. Relations

Description: This report discusses the background information and most recent development in U.S.-China relations since mid-1996. Since the early 1990s, U.S.-China relations have followed an uneven course, with modest improvements overshadowed by various recurring difficulties and setbacks. Longstanding bilateral difficulties have included U.S. problems with the PRC’s worsening human rights record, growing tensions over the PRC’s southern military build-up opposite Taiwan and Taiwan’s political status, and continued controversy over allegations of Chinese proliferation of weapons to unstable regimes.
Date: December 31, 2002
Creator: Dumbaugh, Kerry
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

CMOS Interface Circuits for Spin Tunneling Junction Based Magnetic Random Access Memories

Description: Magneto resistive memories (MRAM) are non-volatile memories which use magnetic instead of electrical structures to store data. These memories, apart from being non-volatile, offer a possibility to achieve densities better than DRAMs and speeds faster than SRAMs. MRAMs could potentially replace all computer memory RAM technologies in use today, leading to future applications like instan-on computers and longer battery life for pervasive devices. Such rapid development was made possible due to the recent discovery of large magnetoresistance in Spin tunneling junction devices. Spin tunneling junctions (STJ) are composite structures consisting of a thin insulating layer sandwiched between two magnetic layers. This thesis research is targeted towards these spin tunneling junction based Magnetic memories. In any memory, some kind of an interface circuit is needed to read the logic states. In this thesis, four such circuits are proposed and designed for Magnetic memories (MRAM). These circuits interface to the Spin tunneling junctions and act as sense amplifiers to read their magnetic states. The physical structure and functional characteristics of these circuits are discussed in this thesis. Mismatch effects on the circuits and proper design techniques are also presented. To demonstrate the functionality of these interface structures, test circuits were designed and fabricated in TSMC 0.35{micro} CMOS process. Also circuits to characterize the process mismatches were fabricated and tested. These results were then used in Matlab programs to aid in design process and to predict interface circuit's yields.
Date: December 31, 2002
Creator: Saripalli, Ganesh
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980

Description: The Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act -- otherwise known as CERCLA or Superfund -- provides a Federal "Superfund" to clean up uncontrolled or abandoned hazardous-waste sites as well as accidents, spills, and other emergency releases of pollutants and contaminants into the environment. Through CERCLA, EPA was given power to seek out those parties responsible for any release and assure their cooperation in the cleanup.
Date: December 31, 2002
Creator: United States. Congress.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Congressional Budget Actions in 2002

Description: During the second session of the 107th Congress, the House and Senate will consider many different budgetary measures. Most of these measures will pertain to FY2003 (which will begin on October 1, 2002) and beyond, but some may make adjustments to the budget for FY2002. As the congressional session progresses, this issue brief will describe House and Senate action on major budgetary legislation within the framework of the congressional budget process and other procedural requirements.
Date: December 31, 2002
Creator: Heniff, Bill, Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Creep Resistant Zinc Alloy

Description: This report covers the development of Hot Chamber Die Castable Zinc Alloys with High Creep Strengths. This project commenced in 2000, with the primary objective of developing a hot chamber zinc die-casting alloy, capable of satisfactory service at 140 C. The core objectives of the development program were to: (1) fill in missing alloy data areas and develop a more complete empirical model of the influence of alloy composition on creep strength and other selected properties, and (2) based on the results from this model, examine promising alloy composition areas, for further development and for meeting the property combination targets, with the view to designing an optimized alloy composition. The target properties identified by ILZRO for an improved creep resistant zinc die-casting alloy were identified as follows: (1) temperature capability of 1470 C; (2) creep stress of 31 MPa (4500 psi); (3) exposure time of 1000 hours; and (4) maximum creep elongation under these conditions of 1%. The project was broadly divided into three tasks: (1) Task 1--General and Modeling, covering Experimental design of a first batch of alloys, alloy preparation and characterization. (2) Task 2--Refinement and Optimization, covering Experimental design of a second batch of alloys. (3) Task 3--Creep Testing and Technology transfer, covering the finalization of testing and the transfer of technology to the Zinc industry should have at least one improved alloy result from this work.
Date: December 31, 2002
Creator: Goodwin, Frank E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Critical Phenomena of the Disorder Driven Localization-Delocalization Transition

Description: Metal-to-insulator transitions are generally linked to two phenomena: electron-electron correlations and disorder. Although real systems are usually responding to a mixture of both, they can be classified as undergoing a Mott-transition, if the former process dominates, or an Anderson-transition, if the latter dominates. High-T{sub c} superconductors, e.g., are a candidate for the first class. Materials in which disorder drives the metal-to-insulator transition include doped semiconductors and amorphous materials. After briefly reviewing the previous research on transport in disordered materials and the disorder-induced metal-to-insulator transition, a summary of the model and the methods used in subsequent chapters is given.
Date: December 31, 2002
Creator: Ruhlander, Marc
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

DESIGN, FABRICATION, AND TESTING OF AN ADVANCED, NON-POLLUTING TURBINE DRIVE GAS GENERATOR

Description: The objectives of this report period were to continue and complete testing of the Gas Generator hardware, to complete and submit a Draft Final Report, and after incorporation of adjustments required, to then submit the Final Report. Focus during this report period was initially on testing the Gas Generator. While conducting scheduled full power tests of the Gas Generator at the facilities of the testing sub-contractor, National Testing Services [NTS], in Santa Clarita CA, anomalies in the performance of the Gas Generator were discovered. All testing was stopped on November 6, 2002. An expert team was formed to evaluate the anomalies and to recommend any appropriate corrective actions. After extensive analyses of the actual hardware, the test data acquired and recorded during testing, and a review of the test facilities and procedures, the Anomalies Review Team recommended that CES modify the combustion chamber front end cooling method and modify the configuration of the diluent injectors downstream of the combustion chamber, to eliminate the anomalies. At a review meeting convened in Sacramento CA on November 23, 2002, outside experts from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Air Liquide's Research Center in Chicago IL, and the California Energy Commission, confirmed that the expert team's assessed cause of the problem was the likely cause, and the recommended corrective actions were appropriate. Modified hardware drawings were produced in late November-early December 2002, hardware fabrication was begun in December, and was in process at the end of December. Also during December, the NTS test facility was being adjusted to take account of the modified hardware configuration being produced. All work was aimed toward realizing a schedule of resumed testing by mid-January for completion of tests by end of January or early February, 2003. Original objectives of the program remain in place and approximately ninety (90) percent ...
Date: December 31, 2002
Creator: Doyle, Stephen E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Design of Surface Micromachined Compliant MEMS

Description: The consideration of compliant mechanisms as Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) is the focus of this research endeavor. MEMS are micron to millimeter devices that combine electrical, mechanical, and information processing capabilities on the same device. These MEMS need some mechanical motion or parts that move relative to each other. This relative motion, using multiple parts, is not desired because of the assembly requirement and the friction introduced. Compliant devices limits or eliminates friction and the need for multi-component assembly. Compliant devices improve designs by creating single piece mechanisms. The purpose of this research is to validate surface micromachining as a viable fabrication process for compliant MEMS designs. Specifically, this research has sought to fabricate a micro-compliant gripper and a micro-compliant clamp to illustrate the process. While other researchers have created compliant MEMs, most have used comb-drive actuation methods and bulk micromachining processes. This research focused on fully-compliant devices that use device flexibility for motion and actuation. Validation of these compliant MEMS is achieved by structural optimization of device design and functional performance testing. This research contributes to the ongoing research in MEMS by evaluating the potential of using surface micromachining as a process for fabricating compliant micro-mechanisms.
Date: December 31, 2002
Creator: Bradley, Joe Anthony
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development of OTM Syngas Process and Testing of Syngas Derived Ultra-clean Fuels in Diesel Engines and Fuel Cells

Description: This topical report summarizes work accomplished for the Program from November 1, 2001 to December 31, 2002 in the following task areas: Task 1: Materials Development; Task 2: Composite Development; Task 4: Reactor Design and Process Optimization; Task 8: Fuels and Engine Testing; 8.1 International Diesel Engine Program; 8.2 Nuvera Fuel Cell Program; and Task 10: Program Management. Major progress has been made towards developing high temperature, high performance, robust, oxygen transport elements. In addition, a novel reactor design has been proposed that co-produces hydrogen, lowers cost and improves system operability. Fuel and engine testing is progressing well, but was delayed somewhat due to the hiatus in program funding in 2002. The Nuvera fuel cell portion of the program was completed on schedule and delivered promising results regarding low emission fuels for transportation fuel cells. The evaluation of ultra-clean diesel fuels continues in single cylinder (SCTE) and multiple cylinder (MCTE) test rigs at International Truck and Engine. FT diesel and a BP oxygenate showed significant emissions reductions in comparison to baseline petroleum diesel fuels. Overall through the end of 2002 the program remains under budget, but behind schedule in some areas.
Date: December 31, 2002
Creator: Robinson, E. T.; Meagher, James P.; Apte, Prasad; Gui, Xingun; Bulicz, Tytus R.; Aasland, Siv et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

DEVELOPMENT OF RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION TECHNIQUES AND PRODUCTION MODELS FOR EXPLOITING NATURALLY FRACTURED RESERVOIRS

Description: For many years, geoscientists and engineers have undertaken research to characterize naturally fractured reservoirs. Geoscientists have focused on understanding the process of fracturing and the subsequent measurement and description of fracture characteristics. Engineers have concentrated on the fluid flow behavior in the fracture-porous media system and the development of models to predict the hydrocarbon production from these complex systems. This research attempts to integrate these two complementary views to develop a quantitative reservoir characterization methodology and flow performance model for naturally fractured reservoirs. The research has focused on estimating naturally fractured reservoir properties from seismic data, predicting fracture characteristics from well logs, and developing a naturally fractured reservoir simulator. It is important to develop techniques that can be applied to estimate the important parameters in predicting the performance of naturally fractured reservoirs. This project proposes a method to relate seismic properties to the elastic compliance and permeability of the reservoir based upon a sugar cube model. In addition, methods are presented to use conventional well logs to estimate localized fracture information for reservoir characterization purposes. The ability to estimate fracture information from conventional well logs is very important in older wells where data are often limited. Finally, a desktop naturally fractured reservoir simulator has been developed for the purpose of predicting the performance of these complex reservoirs. The simulator incorporates vertical and horizontal wellbore models, methods to handle matrix to fracture fluid transfer, and fracture permeability tensors. This research project has developed methods to characterize and study the performance of naturally fractured reservoirs that integrate geoscience and engineering data. This is an important step in developing exploitation strategies for optimizing the recovery from naturally fractured reservoir systems. The next logical extension of this work is to apply the proposed methods to an actual field case study to provide information for ...
Date: December 31, 2002
Creator: Wiggins, Michael L.; Brown, Raymon L.; Civan, Faruk & Hughes, Richard G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

DEVELOPMENT OF TECHNOLOGIES AND ANALYTICAL CAPABILITIES FOR VISION 21 ENERGY PLANTS

Description: A software design review meeting was conducted (Task 2.0). A CFD Viewer was developed, to allow the process analyst to view CFD results from the process simulator (Task 2.14). Work on developing a CO wrapper for the INDVU code was continued (Task 2.15). The model-edit GUI was modified to allow the user to specify a solution strategy. Enhancements were made to the solution strategy implementation (Task 2.16). Testing of the integrated software was continued and several bug fixes and enhancements were made: ability to expose CFD parameters to the process analyst and support for velocity and pressure inlet boundary conditions (Task 2.21). Work on preparing the release version progressed: Version 0.3 of V21 Controller was released, a global configuration dialog was implemented, and a code review process was initiated (Task 2.24). The calibration of the tube bank CFD model for the RP&L case was completed. While integrating the tube bank CFD model into the flow sheet model, several development requirements were identified and communicated to the developers. The requirements of porting V21 Controller and Configuration Wizard to FLUENT 6.1, turning off the transfer of temperature dependent properties, exposing CFD parameters in Aspen Plus and supporting velocity boundary conditions have been implemented (Task 4.1). An initial grid for the HRSG component has been prepared (Task 4.2). A web-based advisory board meeting was conducted on December 18, 2003 (Task 5.0). Project personnel attended and gave presentations at the Aspen World Conference, October 28-30, 2002; AIChE Annual Meeting, November 8, 2002; and the Vision 21 Simulation meeting at Iowa State University, November 19-20, 2002 (Task 7.0).
Date: December 31, 2002
Creator: Madhava Syamlal, Ph.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

DOE Matching Grant Program

Description: Funding used to support a portion of the Nuclear Engineering Educational Activities. Upgrade of teaching labs, student support to attend professional conferences, salary support for graduate students. The US Department of Energy (DOE) has funded Purdue University School of Nuclear Engineering during the period of five academic years covered in this report starting in the academic year 1996-97 and ending in the academic year 2000-2001. The total amount of funding for the grant received from DOE is $416K. In the 1990's, Nuclear Engineering Education in the US experienced a significant slow down. Student enrollment, research support, number of degrees at all levels (BS, MS, and PhD), number of accredited programs, University Research and Training Reactors, all went through a decline to alarmingly low levels. Several departments closed down, while some were amalgamated with other academic units (Mechanical Engineering, Chemical Engineering, etc). The School of Nuclear Engineering at Purdue University faced a major challenge when in the mid 90's our total undergraduate enrollment for the Sophomore, Junior and Senior Years dropped in the low 30's. The DOE Matching Grant program greatly strengthened Purdue's commitment to the Nuclear Engineering discipline and has helped to dramatically improve our undergraduate and graduate enrollment, attract new faculty and raise the School of Nuclear Engineering status within the University and in the National scene (our undergraduate enrollment has actually tripled and stands at an all time high of over 90 students; total enrollment currently exceeds 110 students). In this final technical report we outline and summarize how the grant was expended at Purdue University.
Date: December 31, 2002
Creator: Tsoukalas, L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Dopants and Doping Level Dependence of the Structure and Magnetic Properties of the Eu (BA1-xLRx)2Cu3O7+Theta

Description: Eu(Ba{sub 1-x}Nd{sub x}){sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7+{delta}} were systematically studied in order to understand how the valence of the rear earth elements, ionic sizes and magnetic moment affect the crystal structure and magnetic and electrical properties. Differential thermal analyses were carried out to check the phase purity, X-ray data were least-squares fitted to determine the lattice parameters, and DC-SQUID magnetometry was used to characterize the superconducting properties. These results showed that the crystallography is consistent with other EuLR123ss series, LR = La, Pr, Eu. The lattice parameters vary with the ionic radii of the rare earth ions. Unlike the uniform change in lattice parameter, the superconducting transition did not vary systematically with the ionic size of the dopants. Although the general trend was for T{sub c} to decrease with decreasing ionic size of the dopant, for the same doping level, Pr was anomalous, depressing T{sub c} faster. Although the exact mechanism is not clear, this result is consistent with the depression of T{sub c} for Pr substitution for the rare earth in R123. The critical current J{sub c} was determined using the Bean model from magnetization versus field measurements as a function of temperature and field. The effect of the dopants on J{sub c} with the increasing of temperature or applied field was determined. For T < 77 K and small values of x, the value of J{sub c} was increased over that of the x = 0 sample. In addition, the smaller the substituting atom, the higher the J{sub c} becomes. For instance, at x = 0.025, Eu123 < EuLa.025 < EuPr.025 < EuNd.025 < EuEu.025. The enhancement of J{sub c} disappears for x > 0.05 and T > 0.5T{sub c}.
Date: December 31, 2002
Creator: Lin, Yu
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Doping Experiments on Low-Dimensional Oxides and a Search for Unusual Magnetic Properties of MgAlB14

Description: Doping experiments on La{sub 2}CuO{sub 4}, Sr{sub 2}CuO{sub 3} and SrCu{sub 2}(BO{sub 3}){sub 2} were performed with the intent of synthesizing new metallic low-=dimensional cuprate oxide compounds. Magnetic susceptibility {chi}(T) measurements on a polycrystalline La{sub 2}CuO{sub 4} sample chemically oxidized at room temperature in aqueous NaClO showed superconductivity with a superconducting transition temperature T{sub c} of 42.6 K and a Meissner fraction of 26%. They were unable to electrochemically oxidize La{sub 2}CuO{sub 4} in a nonaqueous solution of tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAOH) and methanol. Sr{sub 2}CuO{sub 3} was found to decompose upon exposure to air and water. Electron paramagnetic resonance, isothermal magnetization M(H), and {chi}(T) measurements on the primary decomposition product, Sr{sub 2}Cu(OH){sub 6}, were consistent with a nearly isolated, spin S = 1/2, local moment model for the Cu{sup +2} spins. From a fit of {chi}(T) by the Curie-Weiss law and of the M(H) isotherms by a modified Brillouin function, the weakly antiferromagnetic exchange interaction between adjacent Cu{sup +2} spins in Sr{sub 2}Cu(OH){sub 6} was found to be J/k{sub B} = 1.06(4) K. Doping studies on SrCu{sub 2}(BO{sub 3}){sub 2} were inconclusive. {chi}(T) measurements on an undoped polycrystalline sample of SrCu{sub 2}(BO{sub 3}){sub 2}, a sample treated with distilled water, and a sample treated with aqueous NaClO showed no qualitative differences between the samples. In addition, {chi}(T) and M(H, T) studies of the ultra-hard material MgAlB{sub 14} were carried out in search of superconductivity or ferromagnetism in this compound. {chi}(T) measurements on a powder sample revealed temperature-independent diamagnetism from 1.8 K up to room temperature with a Curie-Weiss impurity concentration equivalent to {approx} 1 mol% of spin-1/2 ions. In contrast, M(H, T) data on hot pressed samples showed evidence of ferromagnetic transitions above {approx} 330 K. Scanning electron microscopy and Auger microprobe analysis of the hot pressed samples indicated that ...
Date: December 31, 2002
Creator: Hill, Julienne Marie
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Federal Employees' Health Plans: Premium Growth and OPM's Role in Negotiating Benefits

Description: A letter report issued by the General Accounting Office with an abstract that begins "Federal employees' health insurance premiums have increased at double-digit rates for 3 consecutive years. GAO was asked to examine how the Federal Employees Health Benefits Program's (FEHBP) premium trends compared to those of other large purchasers of employer-sponsored health insurance, factors contributing to FEHBP's premium growth, and steps the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) takes to help contain premium increases compared to those of other large purchasers. GAO compared FEHBP to the California Public Employees' Retirement System (CalPERS), General Motors, and a large private-employer purchasing coalition in California as well as data from employee benefit surveys."
Date: December 31, 2002
Creator: United States. General Accounting Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Federal Student Aid: Progress in Integrating Pell Grant and Direct Loan Systems and Processes, but Critical Work Remains

Description: A letter report issued by the General Accounting Office with an abstract that begins "To address system problems and other long-standing management weaknesses, in 1998, the Congress created a discrete unit within the Department of Education, the Office of Federal Student Aid (FSA). This office subsequently adopted a new approach to systems integration using middleware (a type of software that can allow an application to access data residing in different databases) and Extensible Markup Language (XML)--a flexible, nonproprietary set of standards that is intended to make it easier to identify, integrate, and process information widely dispersed among systems and organizations. FSA's first use of this approach is the Common Origination and Disbursement (COD) process for the Direct Loan, Pell Grant, and campus-based programs. GAO initiated a follow-up review to assess FSA's progress in implementing this process."
Date: December 31, 2002
Creator: United States. General Accounting Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Final Technical Progress Report

Description: Michigan Technological University has demonstrated major inroads in establishing the viability of utilizing aluminum smelting by-product waste materials in lightweight concrete product applications. The research identified key elements of producing various forms of lightweight concrete products through utilizing various procedures and mixture components with the by-product materials. A process was developed through pilot plant testing that results in additional aluminum recovery at finer sizes, a clean returnable salt product through spray drying technology, and a low-salt-content oxide product with enough aluminum metal content that it can be used to form lightweight cementitious mixtures. Having three distinct products aids in generating favorable process economics. Revenue projections from aluminum recovery and salt recovery are enough to cover processing costs and create a cost-free oxide product to market for lightweight concrete applications. This supply side commercialization strategy offers aluminum by-product recyclers a potentially no cost product, which has been demonstrated through this project to create desirable and marketable lightweight concrete products of various forms. Environmental benefits to the public are tremendous. At best, all dross and salt cake materials have the potential to be completely recycled and utilized. At worst, disposal sites would see a reduced amount of material: a post processed oxide product with little salt and no hydrogen sulfide or ammonia gas generating capability, which, if isolated from high alkali conditions, would pose no reactivity concerns. The US aluminum industry has historically, along with the steel industry, been a leader in recycling metal. The findings from this project, increased metal recovery, improved salt recycling, and demonstrated end uses for oxide residues, will go a long way in helping the aluminum industry obtain 100% material utilization and zero discharge.
Date: December 31, 2002
Creator: Hwang, J.Y. & Greenlund, R.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fundamental Thermal Fluid Physics of High Temperature Flows in Advanced Reactor Systems - Nuclear Energy Research Initiative Program Interoffice Work Order (IWO) MSF99-0254 Final Report for Period 1 August 1999 to 31 December 2002

Description: The ultimate goal of the study is the improvement of predictive methods for safety analyses and design of advanced reactors for higher efficiency and enhanced safety and for deployable reactors for electrical power generation, process heat utilization and hydrogen generation. While key applications would be advanced gas-cooled reactors (AGCRs) using the closed Brayton cycle (CBC) for higher efficiency (such as the proposed Gas Turbine - Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR) of General Atomics [Neylan and Simon, 1996]), results of the proposed research should also be valuable in reactor systems with supercritical flow or superheated vapors, e.g., steam. Higher efficiency leads to lower cost/kwh and reduces life-cycle impacts of radioactive waste (by reducing waters/kwh). The outcome will also be useful for some space power and propulsion concepts and for some fusion reactor concepts as side benefits, but they are not the thrusts of the investigation. The objective of the project is to provide fundamental thermal fluid physics knowledge and measurements necessary for the development of the improved methods for the applications.
Date: December 31, 2002
Creator: McEligot, D.M.; Condie, K.G.; Foust, T.D.; McCreery, G.E.; Pink, R.J.; Stacey, D.E. (INEEL) et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

HIGH RESOLUTION PREDICTION OF GAS INJECTION PROCESS PERFORMANCE FOR HETEROGENEOUS RESERVOIRS

Description: This report outlines progress in the first quarter of the third year of the DOE project ''High Resolution Prediction of Gas Injection Process Performance for Heterogeneous Reservoirs''. In this report we present an application of compositional streamline simulation in modeling enhanced condensate recovery via gas injection. These processes are inherently compositional and detailed compositional fluid descriptions must be use to represent the flow behavior accurately. Compositional streamline simulation results are compared to those of conventional finite-difference (FD) simulation for evaluation of gas injection schemes in condensate reservoirs. We present and compare streamline and FD results for two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) examples, to show that the compositional streamline method is a way to obtain efficiently estimates of reasonable accuracy for condensate recovery by gas injection.
Date: December 31, 2002
Creator: Franklin M. Orr, Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department