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You Shook Me All Campaign Long: Music in the 2016 Presidential Election and Beyond

Description: Music has long played a role in American presidential campaigns as a mode of both expressing candidates’ messages and criticizing the opposition. The 2016 campaign was no exception and was a game changer similar to the development of music in the 1840 campaign, when “Tippecanoe and Tyler Too” helped sing William Harrison into the White House. The ten chapters in this collection place music use in 2016 in historical perspective before examining musical messaging, strategy, and parody. The book ultimately explores causality: how do music and musicians affect presidential elections, and how do politicians and campaigns affect music and musicians? The authors explain this interaction from various perspectives, with methodological approaches from several fields, including political science, legal studies, musicology, cultural studies, rhetorical studies, and communications and journalism. These chapters will help the reader understand music in the 2016 election to realize how music will be relevant in 2020 and beyond.
Date: November 2018
Creator: Kasper, Eric T. & Schoening, Benjamin S.
Partner: UNT Press

Performance and Accountability Report Fiscal Year 2017

Description: The Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) is an independent grant making agency and the primary source of federal support for the nation’s approximately 120,000 libraries and 35,000 museums and related organizations. IMLS helps ensure that all Americans have access to museum, library, and information services. The agency supports innovation, lifelong learning, and cultural and civic engagement, enabling museums and libraries from geographically and economically diverse areas to deliver essential services that make it possible for individuals and communities to thrive. The agency’s mission is to inspire libraries and museums to advance innovation, learning, and civic engagement and to provide leadership through research, policy development, and grant making.Those goals are reflected in this year’s report as IMLS continues to be an outstanding steward of federal funds. IMLS will continue to look for ways to achieve even greater impact on library and museum services throughout the United States.
Date: November 15, 2017
Creator: Institute of Museum and Library Services (U.S.)
Partner: UNT Libraries

ActivAmerica

Description: Series of fictional stories and commentaries about sports in the United States and how they affect individuals and communities.
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Date: November 2017
Creator: Cass, Meagan
Partner: UNT Press

Proof: Photographs from Four Generations of a Texas Family

Description: "The Byrd Williams Collection at the University of North Texas contains more than 10,000 prints and 300,000 negatives, accumulated by four generations of Texas photographers, all named Byrd Moore Williams. Beginning in the 1880s in Gainesville, the four Byrds photographed customers in their studios, urban landscapes, crime scenes, Pancho Villa's soldiers, televangelists, and whatever aroused their unpredictable and wide-ranging curiosity. When Byrd IV sat down to choose a selection from this dizzying array, he came face to face with the nature of mortality and memory, his own and his family's. In some cases these photos are the only evidence remaining that someone lived and breathed on this earth"--Amazon. The contents include: Foreword : One bright thread / Roy Flukinger -- Photographs : The family album -- Landscape -- Postcard -- The Great Depression -- Studio -- People -- Non-people -- Violence and religion in Texas -- Night -- Afterword : Palimpsest / Anne Wilkes Tucker.
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Date: November 2016
Creator: Williams, Byrd M., IV
Partner: UNT Press

A Different Face of War: Memories of a Medical Service Corps Officer in Vietnam

Description: Assigned as the senior medical advisor to the Army of the Republic of Vietnam in I Corps, an area close to the DMZ, James G. Van Straten traveled extensively and interacted with military officers and non-commissioned officers, peasant-class farmers, Buddhist bonzes, shopkeepers, scribes, physicians, nurses, the mentally ill, and even political operatives. He sent his wife daily letters from July 1966 through June 1967, describing in impressive detail his experiences, and those letters became the primary source for his memoir. The author is grateful that his wife retained all the letters he wrote to her and their children during the year they were apart. The author describes with great clarity and poignancy the anguish among the survivors when an American cargo plane in bad weather lands short of the Da Nang Air Base runway on Christmas Eve and crashes into a Vietnamese coastal village, killing more than 100 people and destroying their village; the heart-wrenching pleadings of a teenage girl that her shrapnel-ravaged leg not be amputated; and the anger of an American helicopter pilot who made repeated trips into a hot landing zone to evacuate the wounded, only to have the Vietnamese insist that the dead be given a higher priority.
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Date: November 2015
Creator: Van Straten, Jim
Partner: UNT Press

Energy Primer: A Handbook of Energy Market Basics

Description: This primer explores the workings of the wholesale markets for natural gas, electricity and oil, which are forms of energy that are of particular interest to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission pursuant to its authority under the Natural Gas Act, the Federal Power Act, and the Interstate Commerce Act.
Date: November 2015
Creator: Federal Energy Regulatory Commission
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A History of Fort Worth in Black & White 165 Years of African-American Life

Description: A History of Fort Worth in Black & White fills a long-empty niche on the Fort Worth bookshelf: a scholarly history of the city's black community that starts at the beginning with Ripley Arnold and the early settlers, and comes down to today with our current battles over education, housing, and representation in city affairs. The book's sidebars on some noted and some not-so-noted African Americans make it appealing as a school text as well as a book for the general reader. Using a wealth of primary sources, Richard Selcer dispels several enduring myths, for instance the mistaken belief that Camp Bowie trained only white soldiers, and the spurious claim that Fort Worth managed to avoid the racial violence that plagued other American cities in the twentieth century. Selcer arrives at some surprisingly frank conclusions that will challenge current politically correct notions. "Selcer does a great job of exploring little-known history about the military, education, sports and even some social life and organizations."--Bob Ray Sanders, author of Calvin Littlejohn: Portrait of a Community in Black and White.
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Date: November 2015
Creator: Selcer, Richard F.
Partner: UNT Press

Houston Blue: The Story of the Houston Police Department

Description: Houston Blue offers the first comprehensive history of one of the nation’s largest police forces, the Houston Police Department. Through extensive archival research and more than one hundred interviews with prominent Houston police figures, politicians, news reporters, attorneys, and others, authors Mitchel P. Roth and Tom Kennedy chronicle the development of policing in the Bayou City from its days as a grimy trading post in the 1830s to its current status as the nation’s fourth largest city. Prominent historical figures who have brushed shoulders with Houston’s Finest over the past 175 years include Houdini, Teddy Roosevelt and his Rough Riders, O. Henry, former Texas Ranger Frank Hamer, hatchet wielding temperance leader Carrie Nation, the Hilton Siamese Twins, blues musician Leadbelly, oilman Silver Dollar Jim West, and many others. The Houston Police Department was one of the first cities in the South to adopt fingerprinting as an identification system and use the polygraph test, and under the leadership of its first African American police chief, Lee Brown, put the theory of neighborhood oriented policing into practice in the 1980s. The force has been embroiled in controversy and high profile criminal cases as well. Among the cases chronicled in the book are the Dean Corll, Dr. John Hill, and Sanford Radinsky murders; controversial cases involving the department’s crime lab; the killings of Randy Webster and Joe Campos Torres; and the Camp Logan, Texas Southern University, and Moody Park Riots.
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Date: November 15, 2012
Creator: Roth, Mitchel P.
Partner: UNT Press

Oral History Interview with Jovita Soria, November 10, 2012

Description: Interview with Jovita Soria, Mexican-born immigrant to Plano, Texas, for the DFW Metroplex Immigration Oral History Project. The interview includes Soria's personal experiences of childhood in Mexico, her first experience in Plano at the age of seventeen and her second on as a live-in nanny, her move to Abilene, Texas, and return to Mexico with her husband. Soria also talks about her return to Plano as an illegal immigrant, difficulties with illegal status, assimilation into Texas culture, children's experiences as Mexican-American, and her thoughts on the immigration process.
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Date: November 10, 2012
Creator: Hedrick, Amy & Soria, Jovita
Partner: UNT Oral History Program

Oral History Interview with Kirthica Chandrasekar, November 20, 2009

Description: Interview with Kirthica Chandrasekar, Indian-born immigrant to Carrollton, Texas, as part of the DFW Metroplex Immigrants Oral History Project. The interview includes Chandrasekar's personal experiences of childhood and education in India, her arranged marriage to a family friend living in New Jersey, and working in the insurance industry. Chandrasekar talks about her first impressions of the U.S., struggling to keep close ties with her family in India, and the contrast of life in India, New Jersey, and Texas.
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Date: November 17, 2009
Creator: Teel, Katherine & Chandrasekar, Kirthica
Partner: UNT Oral History Program

Oral History Interview with Cece Cox, November 6, 2009

Description: Interview with executive director of resource Center Dallas Cece Cox. The interview includes Cox's personal experiences about childhood in Ohio and Bartlesville, Oklahoma, education at Northwestern University, moving to Dallas, and having a career as a photojournalist and studio photographer. Additionally, Cox discusses her coming out narrative, involvement with groups such as Gay and Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation and Dallas Gay Alliance/Dallas Gay and Lesbian Alliance, as well as her decision to enter SMU Law School, and her relationship with her partner, adopted son, and family members. The interview includes an appendix with newspaper articles from the Dallas Morning News and flyers.
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Date: November 6, 2009
Creator: Wisely, Karen & Cox, Cece
Partner: UNT Oral History Program

Oral History Interview with Andrew Joseph Brenner, Sr., November 3, 2009

Description: Interview with Joseph Andrew Brenner Sr., Hungarian-American immigrant to Weatherford, Texas, as part of the DFW Metroplex Immigrants Oral History Project. The interview includes Brenner's personal experiences of childhood and education in Budapest, Hungary, having a career as a tool and die machinist, the involvement with his brothers in anti-Soviet and anti-Communist resistance movements, being captured by Hungarian political police and subsequent torture, his sentence in a Soviet work camp, escaping across the Austrian border, and coping with memories of torture. Additionally, Brenner discusses his father's service in the German Luftwaffe, memories of the Soviet Army entering Budapest in 1945, immigrating to the U.S., settling in Weatherford, his efforts to maintain connections with family in Hungary, and the process of earning his citizenship. The interview includes an appendix with photographs.
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Date: November 3, 2009
Creator: Liles, Debbie & Brenner, Joseph Andrew, Sr.
Partner: UNT Oral History Program