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Effect of Altitude on Radiator Performance

Description: As an airplane rises to high altitudes the decrease in the density and the temperature of the air have important effects on the performance of the radiator. This report gives the results of a study of the effect of reduced pressure and temperature upon the capacity of airplane radiators. A method is presented by which the performance of a radiator at an altitude may be estimated for a particular speed of the airplane at a particular altitude.
Date: 1920
Creator: James, W. S. & Parsons, S. R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A study of airplane ranges and useful loads

Description: This report is an analysis of the maximum flight radii of typical large airplanes and a discussion of the way in which the possible length of flight is affected by the change of weight by consumption of fuel during the flight.
Date: 1920
Creator: Coffin, J. G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Synopsis of aeronautic radiator investigations for years 1917 and 1918

Description: Extensive series of experiments have been conducted at the Bureau of Standards to determine the properties of cooling radiator cores manufactured for airplanes and to develop improvements in design. The analysis of the problem on which this work was based, and consequently the experimental method employed, is different from that commonly used. Instead of attempting to test complete radiators, either full size or in model, uniform sections representing different types of core construction have been tested and an analysis of the results made with a view to determining independently the various factors which influence its performance. This report describes referenced method of analysis in predicting the performance of radiators designed for aeronautic use.
Date: 1920
Creator: Dickinson, H. C. & Kleinschmidt, R. V.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Airplane performance as influenced by the use of a supercharged engine

Description: From Report: "The question of the influence of a supercharged engine on airplane performance is treated here in a first approximation, but one that gives an exact idea of the advantage of supercharging. Considered here is an airplane that climbs first with an ordinary engine, not supercharged, and afterwards climbs with a supercharged engine. The aim is to find the difference of the ceilings reached in the two cases. In the case of our figure, the ceiling from 25,000 feet is increased to 37,000 feet, the supercharging maintaining the power only up to 20,000 feet. This makes, in comparison with an engine without supercharging, an increase of about 50 percent."
Date: May 1920
Creator: De Bothezat, George
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Notes on specifications for French airplane competitions

Description: Given here are the rules officially adopted by the Aeronautical Commission of the Aero Club of France for a flight competition to be held in France in 1920 at the Villacoublay Aerodrome. The prize will be awarded to the pilot who succeeds in obtaining the highest maximum and lowest minimum speeds, and in landing within the shortest distance.
Date: October 1920
Creator: Margoulis, W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Choice of Wing Sections for Airplanes

Description: "The subject of the choice of an airfoil section is by no means a closed one, and despite the impossibility of making a single rule serve, it is quite practicable to deduce in a strictly rational manner a series of rules and formulas which are capable of being of the greatest use if we but confine ourselves to the consideration of one element of performance at a time. There are seven such elements of performance which are here taken up in turn. The seven are of different relative importance in different types of airplanes. The seven elements are: maximum speed regardless of minimum; maximum speed for given minimum; maximum speed range ratio; maximum rate of climb; maximum absolute ceiling; maximum distance non-stop; and maximum duration non-stop" (p. 1-2).
Date: November 1921
Creator: Warner, Edward P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Simple formula for estimating airplane ceilings

Description: From Summary: "The aeronautical engineer often has occasion to estimate the absolute ceiling of an airplane for which a detailed performance calculation is out of the question. In such cases it is customary to use either empirical performance charts or formulae. The performance charts given in several of the recent works on aeronautics are satisfactory so long as the airplane under consideration does not depart too far from the average in its characteristics. The formulae, with one exception, are no better. Given here is that exception, with indications of which terms of the formula may be neglected without seriously affecting the results, thus simplifying the task."
Date: June 1922
Creator: Diehl, Walter S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Use of Multiplied Pressures for Automatic Altitude Adjustments

Description: "The efficient performance of an airplane requires that certain adjustments be made as the density of the air through which the airplane passes changes. The safety of the over-dimensioned aircraft engine depends upon careful manipulation of spark advance and throttle opening and a proper control of a variable pitch propeller, if the maximum performance of the supercharged engine is to be obtained. It is evident that there is a real need for satisfactory devices to make such adjustments automatically. Discussed here is a method of automatic compensation which deserves consideration in the design of such devices" (p. 1).
Date: August 1922
Creator: Sparrow, Stanwood S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

F-5-L Boat Seaplane: performance characteristics

Description: Performance characteristics for the F-5-L Boat Seaplane are given. Characteristic curves for the RAF-6 airfoil and the F-5-L wings, parasite resistance and velocity data, engine and propeller characteristics, effective and maximum horsepower, and cruising performance are discussed.
Date: October 1922
Creator: Diehl, W. S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Reliable formulae for estimating airplane performance and the effects of changes in weight, wing area, or power

Description: This report contains the derivation and the verification of formulae for predicting the speed range ratio, the initial rate of climb, and the absolute ceiling of an airplane. Curves used in the computation are given in NACA-TR-171. Standard formulae for service ceiling, time of climb, cruising range, and endurance are also given in the conventional forms.
Date: January 1924
Creator: Diehl, Walter S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Specializing for Record-Breaking

Description: This report seeks to determine what constitutes airplane performance and what line should be followed in seeking to break records if the designer is given a free hand. Some of the considerations for designers include the ratio of engine power to wing area, minor refinements, low wing loading, and duration.
Date: February 1924
Creator: Warner, Edward P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Logarithmic Polar Curve - Its Theory and Application to the Predetermination of Airplane Performance

Description: "The logarithmic polar curve has for several years been used by the most prominent aerodynamical laboratories as well as by airplane manufacturers in Europe. To show more clearly the practical application of the polar curve, a series of examples are given with suggestions for solution. After a discussion of the theory and the practical application of the polar curve, the following problems are discussed: climbing flight, speed at various altitudes, and the characteristics of two seater observation airplanes of recent design" (p. 1).
Date: October 1924
Creator: Cronstedt, Val
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Charts for graphical estimation of airplane performance

Description: This report contains a series of charts which were developed in order to simplify the estimation of airplane performance. Charts are given for estimating propeller diameter and efficiency, maximum speed, initial rate of climb, absolute ceiling, service ceiling, climb in 10 minutes, time to climb to any altitude, maximum speed at any altitude, and endurance. A majority of these charts are based on the equations given in NACA Technical Report no. 173. Plots of pressure and density against altitude in standard air are also given for convenience. It must be understood that the charts giving propeller diameter, maximum speed, initial rate of climb, absolute ceiling, and speeds at altitudes are approximations subject to considerable error under certain conditions. These particular charts should not be used as a substitute for detailed calculations when accuracy is required, as, for example, in military proposals. (author).
Date: January 1925
Creator: Diehl, Walter S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Estimation of Airplane Performance From Wind Tunnel Tests on Conventional Airplane Models

Description: Calculations of the magnitude of the correction factors and the range of their variations for wind tunnel models used in making aircraft performance predictions were made for 23 wind tunnel models. Calculated performances were compared with those actually determined for such airplanes as have been built and put through flight test. Except as otherwise noted, all the models have interplane struts and diagonal struts formed to streamwise shape. Wires were omitted in all cases. All the models were about 18 inches in span and were tested in a 4-foot wind tunnel. Results are given in tabular form.
Date: May 1925
Creator: Warner, Edward P. & Ober, Shatswell
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Improving the Performance of a Compression Ignition Engine by Directing Flow of Inlet Air

Description: "The object of this report is to present the results of tests performed by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics to determine the effect on engine performance of directing the flow of the inlet air to a 5-inch by 7-inch cylinder, solid injection, compression ignition engine, After a few preliminary tests, comparative runs were made at a speed of 1500 r.p.m. with and without directed air flow. It was found that directing the flow of the inlet air toward the fuel injection valve gave steadier engine operation, and an appreciable increase in power, and decreased fuel consumption" (p. 1).
Date: July 1926
Creator: Kemper, Carlton
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The effect of flight path inclination on airplane velocity

Description: This report was prepared at the request of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics in order to supply a systematic study of the relations between the flight velocity V and its horizontal component V subscript H, in power glides. Curves of V and V subscript H plotted against the inclination of the flight path 0 are given, together with curves which show the maximum values of V subscript H and the corresponding values of 0. Curves are also given showing the effect of small departures from the horizontal in high speed performance testing.
Date: January 1927
Creator: Diehl, Walter S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Combustion Time in the Engine Cylinder and Its Effect on Engine Performance

Description: "As part of a general program to study combustion in the engine cylinder and to correlate the phenomena of combustion with the observed performance of actual engines, this paper presents a sketchy outline of what may happen in the engine cylinder during the burning of a charge. It also suggests the type of information needed to supply the details of the picture and points out how combustion time and rate affect the performance of the engine. A theoretical concept of a flame front which is assumed to advance radially from the point of ignition is presented, and calculations based on the area and velocity of this flame and the density of the unburned gases are made to determine the mass rate of combustion" (p. 393).
Date: April 2, 1927
Creator: Marvin, Charles F., Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Comparative Performance of Roots Type Aircraft Engine Superchargers as Affected by Change in Impeller Speed and Displacement

Description: "This report presents the results of tests made on three sizes of roots type aircraft engine superchargers. The impeller contours and diameters of these machines were the same, but the length were 11, 8 1/4, and 4 inches, giving displacements of 0.509, 0.382, and 0.185 cubic foot per impeller revolution. The information obtained serves as a basis for the examination of the individual effects of impeller speed and displacement on performance and of the comparative performance when speed and displacement are altered simultaneously to meet definite service requirements" (p. 3).
Date: December 23, 1927
Creator: Ware, Marsden & Wilson, Ernest E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Effect on Performance of a Cutaway Center Section

Description: "The assumption is made that a skeleton or cutaway center section is desirable for forward vision and to determine the effect of such mutilation upon performance the following work was done. The airplane used was a Vought VE-7 and in addition to the cutaway center section a system of end plates or fins was installed. Various conditions and combinations were investigated in level flight and in climb" (p. 1).
Date: January 1928
Creator: Carroll, Thomas
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Calculation of Airplane Performances Without the Aid of Polar Diagrams

Description: For good profiles the profile-drag coefficient is almost constant in the whole range which comes into consideration for practical flight. This is manifest in the consideration of the Gottingen airfoil tests and is confirmed by the investigations of the writer (measurements of the profile drag during flight by the Betz method), concerning which a detailed report will soon be published. The following deductions proceed from this fact. The formulas developed on the assumptions of a constant profile-drag coefficient afford an extensive insight into the influences exerted on flight performances by the structure of the airplane.
Date: March 1928
Creator: Schrenk, Martin
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A Few More Mechanical-Flight Formulas Without the Aid of Polar Diagrams

Description: The reliability of the assumption of a parabolic shape of the polar curve is investigated and found satisfactory for all practical purposes. It is further shown that the aerodynamically best possible or "ideal" airplane is produced on this assumption. Lastly, detailed suggestions are given on the possibilities of application of this method of calculation. It especially simplifies the design and evaluation of structural changes and the determination of the limits of technical possibilities. The present report deals only with the relations of the airfoils. The mutual action of the airfoils, engine and propeller will be treated in a subsequent report.
Date: March 1928
Creator: Schrenk, Martin
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department