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12 Batch coalescing studies

Description: The purpose of the study was to identify and correct the problems in the 12 batch coalescing. The final goal is to be able to coalesce 12 booster batches of 11 bunches each into 12 bunches spaced at 21 buckets apart with an average intensity of 200 E9 ppb.
Date: January 1, 1995
Creator: Kourbanis, I.; Wildman, D. & /Fermilab
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

95-3

Description: This vertical painting consists of a highly detailed patterned background across which are scattered various sized circles.
Date: 1995
Creator: Falsetta, Vincent
Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design

95-6

Description: Vertical painting consists of horizontal bands of black and reddish brown and floating on surface are red circles and half-circles.
Date: 1995
Creator: Falsetta, Vincent
Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design

95-7

Description: Dark painting with horizontal and vertical stripes create a plaid pattern of red, blue, and black. Multi-hued circles float on the surface and linear, thin, dark lines create another pattern of zigzag.
Date: 1995
Creator: Falsetta, Vincent
Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design

222-S radioactive liquid waste line replacement and 219-S secondary containment upgrade, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

Description: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing to: (1) replace the 222-S Laboratory (222-S) radioactive liquid waste drain lines to the 219-S Waste Handling Facility (219-S); (2) upgrade 219-S by replacing or upgrading the waste storage tanks and providing secondary containment and seismic restraints to the concrete cells which house the tanks; and (3) replace the transfer lines from 219-S to the 241-SY Tank Farm. This environmental assessment (EA) has been prepared in compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, as amended, the Council on Environmental Quality Regulations for Implementing the Procedural Provisions of NEPA (40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] 1500-1508), and the DOE Implementing Procedures for NEPA (10 CFR 1021). 222-S is used to perform analytical services on radioactive samples in support of the Tank Waste Remediation System and Hanford Site environmental restoration programs. Activities conducted at 222-S include decontamination of analytical processing and support equipment and disposal of nonarchived radioactive samples. These activities generate low-level liquid mixed waste. The liquid mixed waste is drained through pipelines in the 222-S service tunnels and underground concrete encasements, to two of three tanks in 219-S, where it is accumulated. 219-S is a treatment, storage, and/or disposal (TSD) unit, and is therefore required to meet Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303, Dangerous Waste Regulations, and the associated requirements for secondary containment and leak detection. The service tunnels are periodically inspected by workers and decontaminated as necessary to maintain as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) radiation levels. Although no contamination is reaching the environment from the service tunnels, the risk of worker exposure is present and could increase. 222-S is expected to remain in use for at least the next 30 years to serve the Hanford Site environmental cleanup mission.
Date: January 1, 1995
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

241-TX acoustic monitoring 114TX tank waste

Description: This test will involve raising and lowering a sound transmitter in one low and receiver hydrophones in another low at 0.5 ft. intervals over a 12 ft. depth, which is the depth of the waste. The soundings are recorded by equipment outside the tank farm fence.
Date: January 1, 1995
Creator: Hurley, J. V.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

384 Power plant waste water sampling and analysis plan

Description: This document presents the 384 Power House Sampling and Analysis Plan. The Plan describes sampling methods, locations, frequency, analytes, and stream descriptions. The effluent streams from 384, were characterized in 1989, in support of the Stream Specific Report (WHC-EP-0342, Addendum 1).
Date: January 1, 1995
Creator: Hagerty, K. J. & Knotek, H. M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

1992-1993 Bonneville Appliance Efficiency Program: Showerhead evaluation. Volume I - report

Description: The Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) provides wholesale electric power to over 100 retail distribution utilities in the Pacific Northwest. Bonneville is faced with meeting growing loads from these utilities. It acquires conservation as one means of meeting this load growth. Bonneville has offered a variety of conservation programs since 1980. Efficient showerheads have been a feature in residential conservation programs ever since. Bonneville launched the Residential Appliance Efficiency Program to focus on water-heater energy conservation opportunities in 1992. The Residential Appliance Efficiency Program consists of two parts, a water-heater efficiency program, and a hot-water efficiency program. This report evaluates the savings and costs of the first two years of the showerhead portion of the Residential Appliance Efficiency Program (the showerhead program). Although it is not a formal evaluation of the program limited to implementation or a {open_quotes}process{close_quotes} evaluation, observations about program design and implementation are included as appropriate. Results of this evaluation are limited to program participants within the Bonneville service territory.
Date: January 1, 1995
Creator: Warwick, W. M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

1992-1993 Bonneville Appliance Efficiency Program: Showerhead Evaluation Volume II - Appendices

Description: This report included the appendices for 1992-1993 Bonneville appliance efficiency program: showerhead evaluation. It consists of nine appendices, titled: Bonneville documents; overview of research projects; Puget Power and Light persistence study; hot-water flow analyses and assumptions documentation; regional end-use metering program; showerhead and faucet aerator performance assessment; Bonneville showerhead program distribution methods by participating utility; water- and energy-saving measure distribution methods literature review; REMP study load shape results.
Date: January 1, 1995
Creator: Warwick, W.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

1992--1993 low-temperature geothermal assessment program, Colorada

Description: Previous assessments of Colorado`s low-temperature geothermal resources were completed by the Colorado Geological Survey in 1920 and in the mid- to late-1970s. The purpose of the 1992--1993 low-temperature geothermal resource assessment is to update the earlier physical, geochemical, and utilization data and compile computerized databases of the location, chemistry, and general information of the low-temperature geothermal resources in Colorado. The main sources of the data included published data from the Colorado Geological Survey, the US Geological Survey WATSTOR database, and the files of the State Division of Water Resources. The staff of the Colorado Geological Survey in 1992 and 1993 visited most of the known geothermal sources that were recorded as having temperatures greater than 30{degrees}C. Physical measurements of the conductivity, pH, temperature, flow rate, and notes on the current geothermal source utilization were taken. Ten new geochemical analyses were completed on selected geothermal sites. The results of the compilation and field investigations are compiled into the four enclosed Quattro Pro 4 databases. For the purposes of this report a geothermal area is defined as a broad area, usually less than 3 sq mi in size, that may have several wells or springs. A geothermal site is an individual well or spring within a geothermal area. The 1992-1993 assessment reports that there are 93 geothermal areas in the Colorado, up from the 56 reported in 1978; there are 157 geothermal sites up from the 125 reported in 1978; and a total of 382 geochemical analyses are compiled, up from the 236 reported in 1978. Six geothermal areas are recommended for further investigation: Trimble Hot Springs, Orvis Hot Springs, an area southeast of Pagosa Springs, the eastern San Luis Valley, Rico and Dunton area, and Cottonwood Hot Springs.
Date: January 1, 1995
Creator: Cappa, J. A. & Hemborg, H. T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

[1994-95 Fact Sheet NTIEVA]

Description: A page from the 1994-95 Fact Sheet for the NTIEVA program. It lists consortium members and project goals for the group.
Date: 1995
Creator: North Texas Institute for Educators on the Visual Arts
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

1994 Northern Goshawk inventory on portions of Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM

Description: Northern goshawks (Accipiter gentilis) (hereafter referred to as goshawk) are large forest dwelling hawks. They are the largest species of the Accipiter genus which also includes sharp-shinned hawks (A. striatus) and the Cooper`s hawk (A. cooperii). Goshawks are holarctic in distribution and nest in coniferous, deciduous, and mixed species forests. In the southwest they primarily nest in ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa), mixed species, and spruce-fir forests. Goshawks may be declining in population and reproduction in the southwestern United States. In 1982 the USDA-Forest Service listed the goshawk as a {open_quotes}sensitive species{close_quotes} and in 1992 the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service listed the goshawk as a {open_quotes}Category 2 species{close_quotes} in accordance with the Endangered Species Act. Reasons for the possible decline in goshawk populations include timber harvesting resulting in the loss of nesting habitat, toxic chemicals, and the effects of drought, fire, and disease. Thus, there is a need to determine their population status and assess impacts of management activities in potential goshawk habitat. Goshawk inventory was conducted during the 1993 nesting season with no adult goshawk responses detected within the LANL survey area. As noted by Sinton and Kennedy, these results may be interpreted in several ways: (1) no goshawk territory(ies) occur in the inventoried area; (2) goshawk territory(ies) exist but have failed prior to the survey and thus were not detected; or (3) territory(ies) exist and were successful but the goshawks did not respond to tapes or their responses were undetected by the observer. For those reasons, a goshawk inventory was conducted in 1994. This report summarizes the results of this inventory.
Date: January 1, 1995
Creator: Sinton, D. T. & Kennedy, P. L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

1995 verification flow testing of the HDR reservoir at Fenton Hill, New Mexico

Description: Recent flow testing of the Fenton Hill HDR reservoir has demonstrated that engineered geothermal systems can be shut-in for extended periods of d= with apparently no adverse effects. However, when this particular reservoir at Venton Hill was shut-in for 2 years in a pressurized condition, natural convection within the open-jointed reservoir region appears to have leveled out the preexisting temperature gradient so that the gradient has now approached a condition more typical of liquid-dominated hydrothermal reservoirs which air invariably almost isothermal due to natural convection. As a result of the sudden flow impedance reduction that led to an almost 50% increase in Production flow new the end of the Second Phase of the LTFR in May 1993, we were uncertain as to the state of the reservoir after being shut-in for 2 years. The flow performance observed during the current testing was found to be intermediate between that at-the end of the Second Phase of the LTFT and that following, the subsequent sudden flow increase, implying that whatever caused the sudden reduction in impedance in the first place is probably somehow associated with the cooldown of the reservoir near the injection interval, since temperature recovery at the surfaces of the surrounding open joints is the most obvious phenomenon expected to occur over time within the reservoir.
Date: January 1, 1995
Creator: Brown, D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

36th Annual Report

Description: The ACIR Library is composed of publications that study the interactions between different levels of government. This document is an annual report.
Date: January 1995
Creator: United States. Advisory Commission on Intergovernmental Relations.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Absorption of Sparingly Soluble Gases by Reactive Media in Self-Aerated Gas-Liquid Contactors: A Scale-Up Procedure

Description: Absorption of sparingly soluble gases, such as NO or O{sub 2}, is greatly enhanced if the latter react with the media. Among a dozen of reactive solvents for NO{sub x} abatement, aqueous acidic urea appears the most economically and environmentally attractive because urea is a cheap reagent and because products of reaction of urea with nitrous acid, formed in the liquid phase via absorption of NO and NO{sub 2}, are carbon dioxide and nitrogen, which can be directly released into the atmosphere. That makes urea process unique among other wet scrubbing processes that routinely produce secondary waste. Its full potential has never been realized, perhaps due to the lack of an efficient gas-liquid contactor to overcome low solubility of NO in aqueous solutions. LLNL has recently designed and built a bench scale gas-liquid contactor for nitric acid regeneration with oxygen. The contactor proved very effective in overcoming the problem of low solubility of oxygen converting back to nitric acid approximately 99% of nitrous acid formed at the cathode (which would otherwise convert to NO{sub x}). The bench scale contactor consists of a 12 inch diameter tank with self-inducting impeller/aerator of very high gas capacity. The aerator represents a 3.5 inch turbine mounted on a vertical shaft inside the draft tube equipped with a stator. During operation the lower half of the turbine induces liquid and the upper half induces gas from the draft tube. The new contactor offers two approaches to solving the NO{sub x} pollution problem. Where full recovery of nitric acid is desired, oxygen can be fed into the contactor to convert nitrous acid into nitric. This approach was demonstrated at LLNL. Alternately, in the proposed acidic urea process nitrous acid, as it forms from NO{sub x}, would be converted to nitrogen, water and carbon dioxide.
Date: January 1995
Creator: Zundelevich, Yury
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Activation and Micropore Structure Determination of Carbon-Fiber Composite Molecular Sieves

Description: The progress of research in the development of novel, rigid, monolithic adsorbent carbon fiber composites is described. Carbon fiber composites am produced at ORNL and activated at the CAER using steam or CO{sub 2} under different conditions, with the aims of producing a uniform degree of activation through the material, and of closely controlling pore structure and adsorptive properties. The principal focus of the work to date has been to produce materials with narrow porosity far use in gas separations. Carbon fiber composites are prepared at ORNL, usually in plate or tubular form, by vacuum molding from water slurries containing phenolic resin and chopped isotropic petroleum pitch fibers. The composites are activated at the CAER in steam or CO{sub 2} using samples of dimensions up to 1.5 x 4 x 12 cm that are cut from the original plates. One of the objectives is to produce uniformly activated composites, which is especially critical when attempting to active large monoliths. It has been found that there are appreciable variations in the density and permeability of the as-formed composites that must relate to the forming technique. These variations are expected to exert some influence on the rate and extent of reaction and surface area development. In attempting to uniformly activate the composites, two reactor configurations have been investigated. In the more successful arrangement, steam ''is introduced at several points along the length of the composite. A reduction in steam partial pressure from 95vol% to 44vol% significantly improved the uniformity of surface area distribution. Activation with CO{sub 2} was still better, which is attributed to the much slower reaction rate than with steam. Measurements of composite dimensions have shown that there is an overall shrinkage during activation. A direct correlation is found between dimensional shrinkage and burnoff, and is similar for a and ...
Date: January 1, 1995
Creator: Jagtoyen, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Active core profile and transport modification by application of Ion Bernstein Wave power in PBX-M

Description: Application of Ion Bernstein Wave Heating (IBWH) into the Princeton Beta Experiment-Modification (PBX-M) tokamak stabilizes sawtooth oscillations and generates peaked density profiles. A transport barrier, spatially correlated with the IBWH power deposition profile, is observed in the core of IBWH assisted neutral beam injection (NBI) discharges. A precursor to the fully developed barrier is seen in the soft x-ray data during edge localized mode (ELM) activity. Sustained IBWH operation is conducive to a regime where the barrier supports large {triangledown}n{sub e}, {triangledown}T{sub e}, {triangledown}v{sub phi}, and {triangledown}T{sub i}, delimiting the confinement zone. This regime is reminiscent of the H(high)-mode but with a confinement zone moved inwards. The core region has better than H-mode confinement while the peripheral region is L(low)-mode-like. The peaked profile enhanced NBI core deposition and increases nuclear reactivity. An increase in central T{sub i} results from {chi}{sub i} reduction (compared to H-mode) and better beam penetration. Bootstrap current fractions of up to 0.32--0.35 locally and 0.28 overall were obtained when an additional NBI burst is applied to this plasma.
Date: January 1, 1995
Creator: LeBlanc, B.; Bell, R. & Batha, S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

An Adaptive System for Process Control

Description: Abstract: Researchers at the U.S. Bureau of Mines (USBM) have developed adaptive process control systems in which genetic algorithms (GA's) are used to augment fuzzy logic controllers (FLC's). GA's are search algorithms that rapidly locate near-optimum solutions to a wide spectrum of problems by loosely modeling the search procedures of natural genetics. FLC's are rule-based systems that efficiently manipulate a problem environment by modeling the "rule-of-thumb" strategy used in human decisionmaking. Together, GA's and FLC's include all of the capabilities necessary to produce powerful, efficient, and robust adaptive control systems. To perform efficiently, such control systems require a cont element to manipulate the problem environment, an analysis element to recognize changes in the problem environment, and an adaptive element to adjust to the changes in the problem environment. The control system also employs a computer simulation of the problem environment. Details of an overall adaptive control system are discussed. A specific laboratory acid-base pH system is used to demonstrate the ideas presented; all results are from the physical laboratory system and not from a computer simulation.
Date: 1995
Creator: Karr, Charles L.; Gentry, E. J. & Stanley, D. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Adhesion of Diamond Films on Tungsten

Description: The U.S. Bureau of Mines has investigated the chemical vapor deposition of diamond films on tungsten substrates. The effects of deposition parameters on the adhesion of the films was determined. The films were produced using a hot filament chemical vapor deposition system. Parameters investigated were substrate temperature and methane concentration in the feed gas. Film quality, morphology, and composition were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Adhesion testing was performed using an indentation technique, and the results were quantified by relating adhesion to interface fracture toughness. Diamond films with well-faceted crystalline morphology with grain size greater than 1 pm had poor adhesion properties regardless of substrate temperature or methane concentration. Diamond films with smooth morphologies consisting of rounded clusters of small (<0.2 pm) diamond crystallites and amorphous carbon phases displayed much higher adhesion, although the conditions that led to the growth of these films are not understood.
Date: 1995
Creator: Maggs, K. J.; Walkiewicz, J. W. & Clark, A. E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Adsorption study for uranium in Rocky Flats groundwater

Description: Six adsorbents were studied to determine their effectiveness in removing uranium in Rocky Flats groundwater. The bench column and batch (Kd) tests showed that uranium can be removed (>99.9%) by four adsorbents. Bone Charcoal (R1O22); F-1 Alumina (granular activated alumina); BIOFIX (immobilized biological agent); SOPBPLUS (mixed metal oxide); Filtrasorb 300 (granular activated carbon); and Zeolite (clinoptilolite).
Date: January 1, 1995
Creator: Laul, J. C.; Rupert, M. C.; Harris, M. J. & Duran, A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Advanced evaporator technology progress report FY 1992

Description: This report summarizes the work that was completed in FY 1992 on the program {open_quotes}Technology Development for Concentrating Process Streams.{close_quotes} The purpose of this program is to evaluate and develop evaporator technology for concentrating radioactive waste and product streams such as those generated by the TRUEX process. Concentrating these streams and minimizing the volume of waste generated can significantly reduce disposal costs; however, equipment to concentrate the streams and recycle the decontaminated condensates must be installed. LICON, Inc., is developing an evaporator that shows a great deal of potential for this application. In this report, concepts that need to be incorporated into the design of an evaporator operated in a radioactive environment are discussed. These concepts include criticality safety, remote operation and maintenance, and materials of construction. Both solubility and vapor-liquid equilibrium data are needed to design an effective process for concentrating process streams. Therefore, literature surveys were completed and are summarized in this report. A model that is being developed to predict vapor phase compositions is described. A laboratory-scale evaporator was purchased and installed to study the evaporation process and to collect additional data. This unit is described in detail. Two new LICON evaporators are being designed for installation at Argonne-East in FY 1993 to process low-level radioactive waste generated throughout the laboratory. They will also provide operating data from a full-sized evaporator processing radioactive solutions. Details on these evaporators are included in this report.
Date: January 1, 1995
Creator: Chamberlain, D.; Hutter, J.C. & Leonard, R.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department