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710 Mockup No. 1 critical experiment. Summary data report

Description: Declassified 21 Sep 1973. A summary of the experiments associated with the three uniformly loaded core configurations related to the 710 Mockup 1 Critical Experiment Reactor is presented. These configurations mocked up specific features of the then current 710 reactor experiment design. The experimental areas included initial loading, neutron lifetime, fission ratios, reflector control methods, reactivity coefficients and power distribution measurements. A major portion of the effort was applied to the latter two areas to determine the comparative effects between normally used fuel cells composed of rod-type materials and homogeneous fuel cells using fabricated fuel compacts''. 7 references. (auth)
Date: October 21, 1966
Creator: Sims, F.L.; Kunze, J.F.; Pincock, G.D. & Chase, P.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Relationship of observed flow patterns to gas core reactor criticality

Description: The gas core reactor requires the establishment of stable and unique flow patterns. A recent series of room temperature flow tests have studied the hydrodynamics, particularly involving gases of differing densities. In an actual operating gas core reactor, the central gas of vaporized uranium will have a much higher density than the surrounding coolant. Testing was done in two different sized chambers (18 inch and 36 inch diameter) to study hydrodynamic scaling. Air was employed as the ''coolant'' gas. Air, argon, and freon, smoked for identification, was used to simulate the fuel. A variety of injectors at various locations in the cavity were employed. (auth)
Date: January 1, 1975
Creator: Macbeth, P.J.; Kunze, J.F. & Rogers, V.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Space heating systems in the Northwest: energy usage and cost analysis

Description: The question of energy usage and cost of providing space heat in the Northwest is discussed. Though space heating needs represents only 18% of the U.S.'s total energy consumption, it nevertheless appears to offer the greatest potential for conservation and near term applications of alternate energy sources. Efficiency and economic feasibility factors are considered in providing for space heating demands. These criteria are presented to establish energy usage, cost effectiveness and beneficial conservation practices for space heating of residential, commercial, and industrial buildings. Four Northwestern cities have been chosen whose wide range of climate conditions are used to formulate the seasonal fuel and capital cost and hence the annual heating cost covering a broad spectrum of heating applications, both the traditional methods, the newer alternate forms of energy, and various methods to achieve more efficient utilization of all types.
Date: January 1, 1976
Creator: Keller, J. G. & Kunze, J. F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Plan for developing moderate temperature/low salinity geothermal resources

Description: The approach to developing moderate temperature (150/sup 0/ to 300/sup 0/F) geothermal resources so that these can competitively enter the energy market is herein described. The specifics discussed relate to experiments in the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory's program effort. These involve the energy supply and disposal systems, the surface conversion equipment for generating electricity, and supplementary uses of the heat directly for industrial and agricultural applications. The experimental facilities are located in the Raft River Valley area of southcentral Idaho, close to the Utah border, and the document describes the purpose and likely economic benefit to result from this experimental program.
Date: May 1, 1976
Creator: Kunze, J. F. & Whitbeck, J. F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Geothermal R and D Project report for period April 1, 1976 to June 30, 1976

Description: Progress during April to July 1976 in research on geothermal energy is reported. The experiments are performed in the Raft River Valley, Idaho, a hydrothermal resource site with water temperatures below 150/sup 0/C. During this period, a third well, RRGE-3 was drilled and well production was tested, testing of a direct contact heat exchanger continued, design and cost estimating continued on a 40 MW (th) organic-binary heat exchange facility, agricultural studies of irrigation with geothermal water progressed, and down-hole data was obtained from RRGE-3. (LCL)
Date: October 1, 1976
Creator: Kunze, J. F. (ed.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Geothermal R and D Project report for period July 1, 1976 to September 30, 1976

Description: Progress in the third quarter of 1976 is reported for the geothermal energy projects conducted by or under the direction of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory of the Energy Research and Development Administration. These projects include the Raft River geothermal development within reservoir and surface testing programs; the Boise Space Heating Project; the design and analysis of power conversion concepts for generating electricity from moderate temperature (approximately 150/sup 0/C or 300/sup 0/F) resources; advanced heat exchanger research and testing; and studies relating to a variety of direct uses of geothermal heat energy.
Date: December 1, 1976
Creator: Kunze, J. F. (ed.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Studies on the 3-Well Reservoir System in Raft River

Description: The geothermal reservoir at Raft River, Idaho, was penetrated with a third deep well in the spring of 1976. The information deduced from this well and the subsequent testing of all three wells is presented in this report. This supplements the paper presented at the 1975 Reservoir Engineering Conference, which discussed in detail the experiences with the first two wells (5000 ft and 6500 ft deep, respectively, 4000 ft apart). Figure 1 shows the location of these wells, and the pipeline between them. 1 ref., 3 figs., 2 tabs.
Date: December 1, 1976
Creator: Kunze, J.F.; Stoker, R.C.; Goldman, D. & Miller, L.G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Potential for utilizing geothermal energy for space heating in re-constructed Sugar City, Idaho

Description: A preliminary overview is presented of the potential application of geothermal energy space-heating uses for Sugar City, Idaho, a town recently devastated by the Teton Dam collapse. The feasibility of planning the reconstruction to include a central heating system to supply all the space heating, and possibly some of the industrial heat is analyzed. The use of geothermal energy to fuel such a system is discussed in detail, with information supplied, principally for comparison on the use of other fuels. (MHR)
Date: January 1, 1977
Creator: Kunze, J. F.; Lofthouse, J. H. & Stoker, R. C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Asbestos--cement pipeline experience at the Raft River Geothermal Project

Description: The first buried asbestos-cement (Transite) pipeline used in high temperature (approximately 300/sup 0/F) service for transport of geothermal fluids was installed in the fall of 1975, and has seen 1/sup 1///sub 2/ years of service. The line is 4000 ft long, between the deep geothermal wells No. 1 and No. 2, in the Raft River Valley of Idaho. The experience in using this pipeline has been satisfactory, and methods have been developed for minimizing the thermal expansion/thermal shock breakage problems. Recommendations on improved design and construction practices for future pipelines are given. The substantially reduced cost (factor of 2) of an asbestos-cement pipeline compared to the conventional steel pipeline, plus the esthetically desirable effect of a buried pipeline dictate adoption of this type as standard practice for moderate temperature geothermal developments. The Raft River Geothermal Project intends to connect all future wells with pipelines of asbestos-cement, insulated with 1 to 2-inches of urethane, and buried between 2 and 3 ft. Total cost will be approximately $110,000/mile for 10-inch diameter pipe, $125,000/mile for 12-inch diameter.
Date: April 1, 1977
Creator: Miller, L. G.; Kunze, J. F. & Sanders, R. D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Geothermal R and D project report, October 1, 1976--March 31, 1977

Description: Testing and analysis on the three deep geothermal wells in Raft River and the two shallow (1200 ft) wells in Boise, plus the experiments leading to improved technology and lower cost for electricity produced from 300/sup 0/F wells are covered. Non-electric direct heat uses of geothermal, to as low as 100/sup 0/F also receive special attention. Appendix A contains a paper: ''Evaluation and Design Considerations for Liquid-Liquid Direct Contact Heat Exchangers for Geothermal Applications.'' Appendix B is a summary of the Freon-113 experiment results. (MHR)
Date: May 1, 1977
Creator: Kunze, J. F. (ed.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Boise, Idaho Geothermal Reservoir

Description: Geothermal district space heating has been practiced in Boise over the last 85 years. The system has used to wells drilled approximately 50 ft (15 m) apart in the early 1890s. the wells have a combined maximum reported production rate of 1800 gpm (114 l/sec) at 170°F (77°C) discharge at the wellhead. The system has served as many as 400 homes and Natatorium; presently it serves approximately 200 homes and a large state laboratory and office building. The heating district remained at the present capacity (two wells) for 85 years primarily because of the unknown nature of the reservoir and availability of other energy sources. Not until 1974 was the question of further development given serious consideration. Rising energy costs due to expanding energy demands and higher costs for foreign oil brought about a reevaluation of the resource. The INEL, Boise State University, and the Idaho Bureau of Mines and Geology began an investigation into the nature of the resource and the economics of space heating several large buildings and homes. Two deep, approximately 1250 ft (381 m), exploratory wells were drilled and tested by the INEL to determine the nature and size of the reservoir. Drilling and reservoir engineering test results have confirmed the presence of a large reservoir that can be developed further without adversely effecting the two production wells and heating system now in operation. 4 figs., 1 tab.
Date: December 14, 1977
Creator: Stoker, R. C.; Kunze, J. F.; Nelson, L. B. & Goldman, D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Update on the Raft River Geothermal Reservoir

Description: Since the last conference, a fourth well has been drilled to an intermediate depth and tested as a production well, with plans to use this well in the long term for injection of fluids into the strata above the production strata. The third, triple legged well has been fully pump tested, and the recovery of the second well from an injection well back to production status has revealed very interesting data on the reservoir conditions around that well. Both interference testing and geochemistry analysis shows that the third well is producing from a different aquifer than that supplying the No. 2 well. There is an effective barrier, yet unidentified as to structure, making pressure communication between these aquifers quite negligible. These results have led to significantly different models for the aquifer system than those previously believed to apply. 3 figs., 1 tab., 3 refs.
Date: December 14, 1977
Creator: Kunze, J. F.; Stoker, R. C. & Allen, C. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department