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Computer Services Personnel: Overtime Pay Under the Fair Labor Standards Act

Description: The Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 (FLSA), as amended, is the primary federal statute in the area of minimum wages and overtime pay. Through administrative rulemaking, the Secretary of Labor has established two tests through which to define eligibility under the Section 13(a)(1) exemption: a duties test and an earnings test. In the 106th Congress, legislation was introduced by Representatives Andrews and Lazio that would have increased the scope of the exemption: first, by expanding the range of exempt job titles, and then, through a relative reduction in the value of the earnings threshold or test. For example, were the minimum wage increased to $6.15 per hour, as pending proposals would do, the value of the computer services exemption threshold would be 4.5 times the federal minimum wage. Ultimately, neither bill was enacted, but the issue has re-emerged as H.R. 1545 (Andrews) and H.R. 546 (Quinn).
Date: January 6, 2002
Creator: Whittaker, William G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Bridging the gap between building science and design studios

Description: Design studios and building science courses have been conducted independent of each other, mainly due to a lack of tools that allow quick and easy consideration of building science criteria, such as comfort and energy requirements, during the design process. Existing tools are not user-friendly and their use requires significant effort in gaining familiarity with the input requirements, understanding the modeling assumptions and interpreting the output. This paper is about the Building Design Advisor (BDA), an evolving computer-based tool intended to bridge the gap between design studios and building science considerations by addressing the above-mentioned limitations of existing tools. BDA allows automatic preparation of input files to multiple simulation tools while the user is working in a CAD environment. BDA automatically activates the relevant simulation tools when the user selects performance parameters to be computed and provides the results in a graphical form, allowing comparison of multiple design options with respect to multiple performance criteria. The paper includes considerations for the use of the BDA in the design studio and ends with a description of the current development efforts and future plans.
Date: February 6, 2002
Creator: Papamichael, Konstantinos & Pal, Vineeta
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Child Support Enforcement: New Reforms and Potential Issues

Description: P.L. 104-193 (the 1996 welfare reform legislation) made major changes to the Child Support Enforcement (CSE) program. Some of the changes include requiring states to increase the percentage of fathers identified, establishing an integrated, automated network linking all states to information about the location and assets of parents, and requiring states to implement more enforcement techniques to obtain collections from debtor parents. Additional legislative changes were made in 1997, 1998, and 1999, but not in 2000. This report describes several aspects of the revised CSE program and discusses three issues that probably will be reexamined by the 107th Congress — CSE financing, parental access by noncustodial parents, and distribution of support payments.
Date: February 6, 2002
Creator: Solomon-Fears, Carmen
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Current and ultimate limitations of scanning x-ray nanotomography.

Description: X-ray nanotomography has developed into a powerful new tool for three-dimensional structural analysis. The scanning approach offers capabilities that are competitive with full-field imaging. Current and ultimate limitations of nanotomography are examined in light of recent work.
Date: February 6, 2002
Creator: McNulty, I.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Demonstration of Alternative Fuel, Light and Heavy Duty Vehicles in State and Municipal Vehicle Fleets

Description: This project involved the purchase of two Compressed Natural Gas School Buses and two electric Ford Rangers to demonstrate their viability in a municipal setting. Operational and maintenance data were collected for analysis. In addition, an educational component was undertaken with middle school children. The children observed and calculated how electric vehicles could minimize pollutants through comparison to conventionally powered vehicles.
Date: February 6, 2002
Creator: Kennedy, John H.; Polubiatko, Peter & Tucchio, Michael A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Demonstration of New Technologies Required for the Treatment of Mixed Waste Contaminated with {ge}260 ppm Mercury

Description: The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) defines several categories of mercury wastes, each of which has a defined technology or concentration-based treatment standard, or universal treatment standard (UTS). RCRA defines mercury hazardous wastes as any waste that has a TCLP value for mercury of 0.2 mg/L or greater. Three of these categories, all nonwastewaters, fall within the scope of this report on new technologies to treat mercury-contaminated wastes: wastes as elemental mercury; hazardous wastes with less than 260 mg/kg [parts per million (ppm)] mercury; and hazardous wastes with 260 ppm or more of mercury. While this report deals specifically with the last category--hazardous wastes with 260 ppm or more of mercury--the other two categories will be discussed briefly so that the full range of mercury treatment challenges can be understood. The treatment methods for these three categories are as follows: Waste as elemental mercury--RCRA identifies amalgamation (AMLGM) as the treatment standard for radioactive elemental mercury. However, radioactive mercury condensates from retorting (RMERC) processes also require amalgamation. In addition, incineration (IMERC) and RMERC processes that produce residues with >260 ppm of radioactive mercury contamination and that fail the RCRA toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) limit for mercury (0.20 mg/L) require RMERC, followed by AMLGM of the condensate. Waste with <260 ppm mercury--No specific treatment method is specified for hazardous wastes containing <260 ppm. However, RCRA regulations require that such wastes (other than RMERC residues) that exceed a TCLP mercury concentration of 0.20 mg/L be treated by a suitable method to meet the TCLP limit for mercury of 0.025 mg/L. RMERC residues must meet the TCLP value of {ge}0.20 mg/L, or be stabilized and meet the {ge}0.025 mg/L limit. Waste with {ge}260 ppm mercury--For hazardous wastes with mercury contaminant concentrations {ge}260 ppm and RCRA-regulated organic contaminants (other than incinerator residues), incineration ...
Date: February 6, 2002
Creator: Morris, M.I.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Environmental Evaluation of New Generation Vehicles and Vehicle Components

Description: This report documents assessments that address waste issues and life cycle impacts associated with the vehicle materials and vehicle technologies being developed under the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV) program. We refer to these vehicles as 3XVs, referring to the PNGV goal that their fuel mileage be three times better than the baseline vehicle. To meet the program's fuel consumption goals, these vehicles substitute lightweight materials for heavier materials such as steel and iron that currently dominate the composition of vehicles, and use engineering and power system changes. Alternative power systems being developed through the PNGV program include batteries for hybrid electric vehicles and fuel cells. With respect to all these developments, it is imperative to learn what effects they will have on the environment before adopting these designs and technologies on a large-scale basis.
Date: February 6, 2002
Creator: Schexnayder, S.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Final Report - Effect of Magnetic Configuration on Spheromak Performances, FY2000 - FY2001, Tracking No.00-SI-008

Description: This is the final report on LDRD SI-funded research to determine the Effect of Magnetic Field Configurations on Spheromak Performance for the years FY2000-FY2001, during which a new set of bias magnetic field coils was used to change the vacuum magnetic field configuration of the SSPX spheromak at LLNL. The USDOE Office of Fusion Energy Science funded the routine operation of the SSPX facility during FY00 and FY01. A photo of the SSPX facility as it appeared in mid-FY01, appears in this report. The main distinctive feature of the spheromak is that currents in the plasma itself produce the confining toroidal magnetic field, rather than a complex set of external coils. The Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment (SSPX) device was designed and built study how well the spheromak can contain plasma energy while dynamo processes in the plasma maintain the confining magnetic fields. The spheromak potentially offers advantages over other fusion reactor concepts because it is compact, has no field coils linking the vacuum vessel, and can be operated in a steady state with voltage applied to external electrodes. It is predicted that the ability of the SSPX to contain the plasma thermal energy will increase with increasing plasma electron temperature; that is, the hotter it is, the better it will work. Our near-term goal for the SSPX facility is to determine which of several magnetic field configurations works best to produce hot, well-confined spheromak plasmas. We also want to verify the predicted inverse relation between plasma temperature and heat loss, and to use these results to design an even higher-temperature follow-on experiment that will push closer to fusion conditions. New features of the SSPX spheromak include a large-radius coaxial plasma injector to improve efficiency, a conformal flux conserver to minimize open field lines around the plasma, a divertor to aid ...
Date: February 6, 2002
Creator: Hill, D N; Hooper, E B; McLean, H S; Stallard, B W; Woodruff, S & Wood, R D
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fusion Power Deployment

Description: Fusion power plants could be part of a future portfolio of non-carbon dioxide producing energy supplies such as wind, solar, biomass, advanced fission power, and fossil energy with carbon dioxide sequestration. In this paper, we discuss key issues that could impact fusion energy deployment during the last half of this century. These include geographic issues such as resource availability, scale issues, energy storage requirements, and waste issues. The resource needs and waste production associated with fusion deployment in the U.S. should not pose serious problems. One important feature of fusion power is the fact that a fusion power plant should be locatable within most local or regional electrical distribution systems. For this reason, fusion power plants should not increase the burden of long distance power transmission to our distribution system. In contrast to fusion power, regional factors could play an important role in the deployment of renewable resources such as wind, solar and biomass or fossil energy with CO2 sequestration. We examine the role of these regional factors and their implications for fusion power deployment.
Date: February 6, 2002
Creator: Schmidt, J.A. & Ogden, J.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Malheur River Wildlife Mitigation, 2000-2002 Technical Report.

Description: The development of hydropower systems within the Columbia and Snake River basins has affected a tremendous amount of fish and wildlife species. The dams have played a major role in the rapid extinction of anadromous runs of salmon and steelhead as well as other native salmonids. Inundation of these dams and the construction of reservoirs for irrigation have also severely impacted wildlife species. In some cases, fluctuating water levels caused by dam and reservoir operations have created barren vegetation zones that expose wildlife to predation and a reduction in recruitment. In association with hydropower activities, secondary impacts have also challenged and highly impacted a majority of wildlife species. The construction of roads, facilities, urban development, channelization, and diversions of streams and rivers often have negative long-term effects on fish, wildlife, and vegetation. In response to these concerns, the United States Congress passed the Pacific Electric Power Planning Conservation Act (Act) in 1980. The Act authorized four states (Idaho, Montana, Oregon and Washington) and 13 Indian Tribes (including the Burns Paiute Tribe) to create the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council). The role of the Council is to prepare a program in conjunction with several participants that protects, mitigates and enhances affected species within the Columbia River Basin and its tributaries. The Council's program, known as the Columbia River Basin's Fish and Wildlife Program (Program), has evolved over the years into a basin-wide approach that incorporates management plans for 52 subbasins. The Program includes a public involvement component that requires Program participants to provide the public with meaningful opportunities to comment on specific management proposals. Participants in this Program include the region's fish and wildlife agencies, Indian tribes, the public and an 11-member panel of scientists referred to as the Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP). Program participants are responsible for creating management ...
Date: February 6, 2002
Creator: Gonzalez, Daniel & Wenick, Jess
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Influence of the Sb dopant distribution on far infrared photoconductivity in Ge:Sb blocked impurity band detectors

Description: Extended long wavelength response to {approx}200 {micro}m (50 cm{sup -1}) has been observed in Ge:Sb Blocked Impurity Band (BIB) detectors with N{sub D} {approx} 1 x 10{sup 16} cm{sup -3}. The cut-off wavelength increases from 150 {micro}m (65 cm{sup -1}) to 200 {micro}m (50 cm{sup -1}) with increasing bias. The responsivity at long wavelengths was lower than expected. This can be explained by considering the observed Sb diffusion profile in a transition region between the blocking layer and active layer. BIB modeling is presented which indicates that this Sb concentration profile increases the electric field in the transition region and reduces the field in the blocking layer. The depletion region consists partially of the transition region between the active and blocking layer, which could contribute to the reduced long wavelength response. The field spike at the interface is the likely cause of breakdown at a lower bias than expected.
Date: February 6, 2002
Creator: Bandaru, Jordana; Beeman, Jeffrey W.; Haller, Eugene E.; Samperi, Stacy & Haegel, Nancy M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Kinetics of Phase Transformation in Welds

Description: The fundamentals of welding-induced phase transformations in metals and alloys are being investigated using a combination of advanced synchrotron based experimental methods and modem computational science tools. In-situ experimental methods have been developed using a spatially resolved x-ray probe to enable direct observations of phase transformations under the real non- isothermal conditions experienced during welding. These experimental techniques represent a major step forward in the understanding of phase transformations that occur during welding, and are now being used to aid in the development of models to predict microstructural evolution under the severe temperature gradients, high peak temperatures and rapid thermal fluctuations characteristic of welds. Titanium alloys, stainless steels and plain carbon steels are currently under investigation, and the phase transformation data being obtained here cannot be predicted or measured using conventional metallurgical approaches. Two principal synchrotron-based techniques have been developed and refined for in-situ investigations of phase transformation dynamics in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) and fusion zone (FZ) of welds: Spatially Resolved X-Ray Diffraction (SRXRD) and Time Resolved X-Ray Diffraction (TRXRD). Both techniques provide real-time observations of phases that exist during welding, and both have been developed at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) using a high flux wiggler beam line. The SRXRD technique enables direct observations of the phases existing in the HAZ of quasi-stationary moving arc welds, and is used to map the HAZ phases by sequentially jogging the weld with respect to the x-ray beam while taking x-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns at each new location. These spatially resolved XRD patterns are collected in linear traverses perpendicular to the direction of weld travel. The XRD data contained in multiple traverses is later compiled to produce an areal map of the phases that existed in the HAZ during welding. The TRXRD technique uses an x-ray beam positioned at one ...
Date: February 6, 2002
Creator: Elmer, J W; Wong, J & Palmer, T
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Metallurgy and Ceramics/Superplasticity in Metals and Ceramics

Description: In the past three years, we have carried out a number of studies on the deformation and superplasticity of fine-structured materials. The goal was to develop an understanding on the deformation microstructure relationship in these advanced materials and to improve further their properties through microstructural control. In this report, we describe only some of the key results and observations from these studies.
Date: February 6, 2002
Creator: Nieh, T G
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Neutral Particle Analyzer Measurements of Ion Behavior in NSTX

Description: Initial results obtained with the Neutral Particle Analyzer (NPA) diagnostic on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) are presented. Magnetohydrodynamic activity and reconnection events cause depletion of the deuterium energetic ion distribution created by neutral-beam injection. Adding High Harmonic Fast Wave Heating to neutral-beam-heated discharges results in the generation of an energetic ion tail above the beam injection energy. NPA measurements of the residual hydrogen ion temperature are in good agreement with those from recombination spectroscopy.
Date: February 6, 2002
Creator: Medley, S.S.; Bell, R.E.; Darrow, D.S. & Roquemore, A.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

On Properties of Compressional Alfven Eigenmode Instability Driven by Superalfvinic Ions

Description: Properties of the instability of Compressional Alfven Eigenmodes (CAE) in tokamak plasmas are studied in the cold plasma approximation with an emphasis on the instability driven by the energetic minority Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH) ions. We apply earlier developed theory [N.N. Gorelenkov and C.Z. Cheng, Nuclear Fusion 35 (1995) 1743] to compare two cases: Ion Cyclotron Emission (ICE) driven by charged fusion products and ICRH Minority driven ICE (MICE) [J. Cottrell, Phys. Rev. Lett. (2000)] recently observed on JET [Joint European Torus]. Particularly in MICE spectrum, only instabilities with even harmonics of deuterium-cyclotron frequency at the low-field-side plasma edge were reported. Odd deuterium-cyclotron frequency harmonics of ICE spectrum between the cyclotron harmonics of protons can be driven only via the Doppler-shifted cyclotron wave-particle resonance of CAEs with fusion products, but are shown to be damped due to the electron Landau damping in experiments on MI CE. Excitation of odd harmonics of MICE with high-field-side heating is predicted. Dependencies of the instability on the electron temperature is studied and is shown to be strong. Low electron temperature is required to excite odd harmonics in MICE.
Date: February 6, 2002
Creator: Gorelenkov, N.N. & Cheng, C.Z.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Polarized parton distributions and the polarized gluon asymmetry.

Description: The flavor-dependent valence, sea quark and antiquark spin distributions can be determined separately from theoretical assumptions and experimental data. The authors have determined the valence distributions using the Bjorken sum rule and have extracted polarized sea distributions, assuming that the quarks and anti-quarks for each flavor are symmetric. Other experiments have been proposed which will allow them to completely break the SU(3) symmetry of the sea flavors. To create a physical model for the polarized gluons, they investigate the gluon spin asymmetry in a proton, A{sub G}(x,Q{sup 2}) = {Delta}G(x,Q{sup 2})/G(x,Q{sup 2}). By assuming that this is approximately Q{sup 2} invariant, they can completely determine the x-dependence of this asymmetry, which satisfies constituent counting rules and reproduces the basic results of the Bremsstrahlung model originated by Close and Sivers. This asymmetry can be combined with the measured unpolarized gluon density, G(x,Q{sup 2}) to provide a prediction for {Delta}G(x,Q{sup 2}). Existing and proposed experiments can test both the prediction of scale-invariance for A{sub G}(x,Q{sup 2}) and the nature of {Delta}G itself. These models can be discussed along with suggestions for specific experiments which can be performed at energies typical of HERA, RHIC and LHC to determine these polarized distributions.
Date: February 6, 2002
Creator: Ramsey, G. P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Radiative Strength Functions in 172Yb below 8 Me V

Description: We have measured prompt {gamma} rays after thermal and resonant neutron capture in {sup 171}Yb. The {gamma} rays were measured with three high resolution ({approx}3 keV) and high efficiency (two {approx}80% Ge(HP) and one {approx}200% segmented Clover) detectors. We have obtained singles and two-fold coincidence spectra as function of neutron energy using the time-of-flight technique. Two-fold coincidences where the summed energy adds up to the neutron binding energy B{sub n} or to B{sub n} minus the energy of the first excited stated ({approx}79 keV) will be used to determine the multipolarity of the pygmy resonance in {sup 172}Yb. This pygmy resonance is a resonant structure in the radiative strength function around {approx}3 MeV in deformed rare earth nuclei [1]. The following goals were met: (1) We have shown the feasibility of prompt, high-resolution {gamma} spectroscopy at FP14 after thermal as well as resonant neutron capture. (2) Online analysis shows that sufficient statistics ({approx}7000 counts) are expected in each of the two relevant peaks in the summed-energy spectrum. Analysis of the experiment is in progress. It still remains to show that the multipolarity of the pygmy resonance can be determined experimentally from two-step cascade intensities.
Date: February 6, 2002
Creator: Schiller, A; Becker, J A; Bernstein, L A; Garrett, P E; Hill, T S; McNabb, D P et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department