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Thyroid absorbed dose for people at Rongelap, Utirik, and Sifo on March 1, 1954

Description: A study was undertaken to reexamine thyroid absorbed dose estimates for people accidentally exposed to fallout at Rongelap, Sifo, and Utirik Islands from the Pacific weapon test known as Operation Castle BRAVO. The study included: (1) reevaluation of radiochemical analysis, to relate results from pooled urine to intake, retention, and excretion functions; (2) analysis of neutron-irradiation studies of archival soil samples, to estimate areal activities of the iodine isotopes; (3) analysis of source term, weather data, and meteorological functions used in predicting atmospheric diffusion and fallout deposition, to estimate airborne concentrations of the iodine isotopes; and (4) reevaluation of radioactive fallout, which contaminated a Japanese fishing vessel in the vicinity of Rongelap Island on March 1, 1954, to determine fallout components. The conclusions of the acute exposure study were that the population mean thyroid absorbed doses were 21 gray (2100 rad) at Rongelap, 6.7 gray (670 rad) at Sifo, and 2.8 gray (280 rad) at Utirik. The overall thyroid cancer risk we estimated was in agreement with results published on the Japanese exposed at Nagasaki and Hiroshima. We now postulate that the major route for intake of fallout was by direct ingestion of food prepared and consumed outdoors. 66 refs., 13 figs., 25 tabs.
Date: March 1, 1985
Creator: Lessard, E.T.; Miltenberger, R.P.; Conrad, R.A.; Musoline, S.V.; Naidu, J.R.; Moorthy, A. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

1985 annual site environmental report for Argonne National Laboratory

Description: This is one in a series of annual reports prepared to provide DOE, environmental agencies, and the public with information on the level of radioactive and chemical pollutants in the environment and on the amounts of such substances, if any, added to the environment as a result of Argonne operations. Included in this report are the results of measurements obtained in 1985 for a number of radionuclides in air, surface water, ground water, soil, grass, bottom sediment, and milk; for a variety of chemical constituents in surface and subsurface water; and for the external penetrating radiation dose.
Date: March 1, 1986
Creator: Golchert, N.W.; Duffy, T.L. & Sedlet, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Defense waste processing facility precipitate hydrolysis process

Description: Sodium tetraphenylborate and sodium titanate are used to assist in the concentration of soluble radionuclide in the Savannah River Plant's high-level waste. In the Defense Waste Processing Facility, concentrated tetraphenylborate/sodium titanate slurry containing cesium-137, strontium-90 and traces of plutonium from the waste tank farm is hydrolyzed in the Salt Processing Cell forming organic and aqueous phases. The two phases are then separated and the organic phase is decontaminated for incineration outside the DWPF building. The aqueous phase, containing the radionuclides and less than 10% of the original organic, is blended with the insoluble radionuclides in the high-level waste sludge and is fed to the glass melter for vitrification into borosilicate glass. During the Savannah River Laboratory's development of this process, copper (II) was found to act as a catalyst during the hydrolysis reactions, which improved the organic removal and simplified the design of the reactor.
Date: March 1, 1986
Creator: Doherty, J P; Eibling, R E & Marek, J C
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Influence of quasi-elastic channels on fusion

Description: Experiments that measure the strength of different transfer reactions in heavy reaction systems at energies in the vicinity of the Coulomb barrier are discussed. A short discussion is given of experimental techniques that are available in this field and their advantages and shortfalls. The main features of the transfer reactions are summarized. Questions concerning the system dependence and energy dependence of the strongest reaction channels are addressed. A systematic picture of the strength of the neutron transfer cross sections is presented. Some examples for correlations between fusion exchangement and transfer cross sections are given.
Date: March 1, 1986
Creator: Rehm, K.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The early solar system abundance of /sup 244/Pu as inferred from the St. Severin chondrite

Description: We describe the analysis of Xe released in stepwise heating of neutron-irradiated samples of the St. Severin chondrite. This analysis indicates that at the time of formation of most chondritic meteorites, approximately 4.56 x 10/sup 9/ years ago, the atomic ratio of /sup 244/Pu//sup 238/U was 0.0068 +- 0.0010 in chondritic meteorites. We believe that this value is more reliable than that inferred from earlier analyses of St. Severin. We feel that this value is currently the best available estimate for the early solar system abundance of /sup 244/Pu. 42 refs., 2 tabs.
Date: March 1, 1987
Creator: Hudson, G.B.; Kennedy, B.M.; Podosek, F.A. & Hohenberg, C.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Excess /sup 129/Xe in terrestrial samples: A non-primordial hypothesis

Description: Excesses of /sup 129/Xe relative to the isotopic composition in air are observed in some terrestrial samples. Traditionally these /sup 129/Xe excesses have been thought to be related to /sup 129/I that was present in abundance in the early solar system. We propose an alternative hypothesis to explain terrestrial /sup 129/Xe excesses based on the production of /sup 129/I from the spontaneous fission of /sup 238/U.
Date: March 1, 1987
Creator: Caffee, M.W. & Hudson, G.B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Report to users of ATLAS (Argonne Tandem-Line Accelerator System)

Description: The operation and development of ATLAS are reported, including accelerator improvements. Particularly noted is an upgrade to extend the mass range of projectiles up to uranium and to increase the beam intensity by at least two orders of magnitude for all ions. Meetings are discussed, particularly of the Program Advisory Committee and the User Group Executive Committee. Some basic information is provided for users planning to run experiments at ATLAS, including a table of beams available. The data acquisition system for ATLAS, DAPHNE, is discussed, as are the following experimental facilities: the Argonne-Notre Dame Gamma Ray Facility, a proposal submitted for constructing a large-acceptance Fragment Mass Analyzer. Brief summaries are provided of some recent experiments for which data analysis is complete. Experiments performed during the period from June 1, 1986 to January 31, 1987 are tabulated, providing the experiment number, scientists, institution, experiment name, number of days, beam, and energy. (LEW)
Date: March 1, 1987
Creator: Ahmad, I. & Glagola, B. (eds.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Solidification of low-level radioactive wastes in masonry cement. [Masonry cement-boric acid waste forms]

Description: Portland cements are widely used as solidification agents for low-level radioactive wastes. However, it is known that boric acid wastes, as generated at pressurized water reactors (PWR's) are difficult to solidify using ordinary portland cements. Waste containing as little as 5 wt % boric acid inhibits the curing of the cement. For this purpose, the suitability of masonry cement was investigated. Masonry cement, in the US consists of 50 wt % slaked lime (CaOH/sub 2/) and 50 wt % of portland type I cement. Addition of boric acid in molar concentrations equal to or less than the molar concentration of the alkali in the cement eliminates any inhibiting effects. Accordingly, 15 wt % boric acid can be satisfactorily incorporated into masonry cement. The suitability of masonry cement for the solidification of sodium sulfate wastes produced at boiling water reactors (BWR's) was also investigated. It was observed that although sodium sulfate - masonry cement waste forms containing as much as 40 wt % Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ can be prepared, waste forms with more than 7 wt % sodium sulfate undergo catastrophic failure when exposed to an aqueous environment. It was determined by x-ray diffraction that in the presence of water, the sulfate reacts with hydrated calcium aluminate to form calcium aluminum sulfate hydrate (ettringite). This reaction involves a volume increase resulting in failure of the waste form. Formulation data were identified to maximize volumetric efficiency for the solidification of boric acid and sodium sulfate wastes. Measurement of some of the waste form properties relevant to evaluating the potential for the release of radionuclides to the environment included leachability, compression strengths and chemical interactions between the waste components and masonry cement. 15 refs., 19 figs., 9 tabs.
Date: March 1, 1987
Creator: Zhou, H. & Colombo, P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Radioiodine in kelp from western Australia

Description: As part of a program to survey low levels of radioactivity in the marine environment of the southern hemisphere, we have studied the distribution and uptake of /sup 131/I found in the subtidal kelp Ecklonia radiata, on the west coast of Australia. Concentrations of 5 to 75 fCi/g of /sup 131/I exist in this species over a considerable distance along the coast. We have characterized the principal source of the /sup 131/I and found a general temporal correlation between the amount of radioiodine discharged from sewer outfalls and its concentration in kelp. Transplant experiments have enabled us to estimate uptake and depuration rates, and our results are consistent with laboratory measurements made by others.
Date: March 25, 1987
Creator: Marsh, K.V.; Buddemeier, R.W.; Wood, W. & Smith, C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Early and continuing effects of combined alpha and beta irradiation of the lung:

Description: This report summarizes an inhalation exposure experiment that concerns early and continuing effects of combined alpha and beta irradiation of the lung of rats. Both morbidity at 18 months and mortality within 18 months after exposure were examined for rats exposed to the beta-emitter /sup 147/Pm, the alpha-emitter /sup 238/Pu, or both combined. The results were used to validate hazard-function models that were developed (1)for pulmonary functional morbidity at 18 months and (2) for lethality from radiation pneumonitis and pulmonary fibrosis within 18 months. Both models were found to adequately predict the experimental observations after combined chronic alpha and beta irradiation of the lung. A relative biological effectiveness of approximately 7 was obtained for /sup 238/Pu alpha radiation compared to /sup 147/Pm beta radiation for both pulmonary functional morbidity and lethality from radiation pneumonitis and pulmonary fibrosis. 12 refs., 16 figs., 11 tabs.
Date: March 1, 1988
Creator: Scott, B.R.; Hahn, F.F.; Snipes, M.B.; Newton, G.J.; Eidson, A.F.; Mauderly, J.L. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fast-neutron elastic scattering from elemental vanadium

Description: Differential neutron elastic- and inelastic-scattering cross sections of vanadium were measured from 4.5 to 10 MeV. These results were combined with previous 1.5 to 4.0 MeV data from this laboratory, the 11.1 MeV elastic-scattering results obtained at Ohio University, and the reported neutron total cross sections to energies of approx.20.0 MeV, to form a data base which was interpreted in terms of the spherical optical-statistical model. A fit to the data was achieved by making both the strengths and geometries of the optical-model potential energy dependent. This energy dependence was large below approx.6.0 MeV. Above approx.6.0 MeV the energy dependencies are smaller, and similar to those characteristic of global models. Using the dispersion relationship and the method of moments, the optical-model potential energy deduced from 0.0 to 11.1 MeV neutron-scattering data was extrapolated to higher energies and to the bound-state regime. This extrapolation leads to predicted neutron total cross sections that are within 3% of the experimental values throughout the energy range 0.0 to 20.0 MeV. Furthermore, the values of the volume-integral-per-nucleon of the real potential are in excellent agreement with those needed to reproduce the observed binding energies of particle- and hole-states. The latter gives clear evidence of the Fermi surface anomaly. Using only the 0.0 to 11.1 MeV data, the predicted E < O behavior of the strength and radius of the real shell-model Woods-Saxon potential are somewhat different from those obtained by Mahaux and Sartor in their analysis of nuclei near closed shells. 61 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.
Date: March 1, 1988
Creator: Smith, A. B.; Guenther, P. T. & Lawson, R. D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

New limit on the neutrinoless double beta decay of /sup 100/Mo

Description: A search for the neutrinoless double beta decay of /sup 100/Mo was conducted using thin Mo films and solid state Si detectors. The experiment has collected 3500 hours of data operating underground in a deep silver mine (3290 M.W.E.). Only one event was found to be consistent with neutrinoless double beta decay. Using this one event, a limit of greater than or equal to 1 x 10/sup 22/ years (1 sigma) is set on the /sup 100/Mo half-life. This is approximately five times larger than the best previous /sup 100/Mo limit.
Date: March 1, 1988
Creator: Krivicich, J. M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Performance testing of radiobioassay laboratories: In vitro measurements (urinalysis): Final report

Description: This report provides results of the two-round nationwide in vitro bioassay intercomparison study. Conclusions were based on analyses by 35 bioassay laboratories of nearly 1400 artificial urine samples containing known quantities of radionuclides. The test radionuclides were H, /sup 89/Sr, /sup 238/Pu, /sup 241/Am, /sup 137/Cs, /sup 60/Co, and natural uranium. The data reported included background count rates, total samples counts, counting times, counting efficiencies, sample yields, and estimated errrors of the determinations. The measurement data were evaluated according to statistical methods presented in the November 1985 version of the draft ANSI Standard N13.30. If a laboratory failed a performance test for any one of the three criteria, the laboratory was considered to have failed the test for that category. 22 refs., 18 figs., 14 tabs
Date: March 1, 1988
Creator: MacLellan, J.A.; Traub, R.J. & Fisher, D.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The interplay of nuclear and atomic physics in the synthesis of the elements

Description: In many astronomical environments, physical conditions are so extreme that matter is almost completely ionized. The absence of bound atomic electrons can dramatically alter the decay rates of a number of radioactive nuclei. Several examples of this interplay of nuclear and atomic physics relevant to the synthesis of the chemical elements are described. 16 refs., 4 figs.
Date: March 1, 1989
Creator: Norman, E.B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Optimization of the factors that accelerate leaching

Description: The prediction of long-term leachability of low-level radioactive waste forms is an essential element of disposal-site performance assessment. This report describes experiments and modeling techniques used to develop an accelerated leach test that meets this need. The acceleration in leaching rates caused by the combinations of two or more factors were experimentally determined. These factors were identified earlier as being able to individually accelerate leaching. They are: elevated temperature, the size of the waste form, the ratio of the volume of leachant to the surface area of the waste form, and the frequency of replacement of the leachant. The solidification agents employed were ones that are currently used to treat low-level radioactive wastes, namely portland type I cement, bitumen, and vinyl ester-styrene. The simulated wastes, sodium sulfate, sodium tetraborate, and incinerator ash, are simplified representatives of typical low-level waste streams. Experiments determined the leaching behavior of the radionuclides of cesium (Cs-137), strontium (Sr-85), and cobalt (Co-60 or Co-57) from several different formulations of solidification agents and waste types. Leaching results were based upon radiochemical and elemental analyses of aliquots of the leachate, and on its total alkalinity and pH at various times during the experiment (up to 120 days). Solid phase analyses were carried out by Scanning/Electron Microscopy and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy on the waste forms before and after some leaching experiments. 43 refs., 96 figs., 16 tabs.
Date: March 1, 1989
Creator: Fuhrmann, M.; Pietrzak, R.F.; Franz, E.M.; Heiser, J.H. III & Colombo, P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The transport of contaminants during storms in the White Oak Creek and Melton Branch Watersheds

Description: This report documents are transport of contaminants from SWSA 5 along two principle pathways: the saturated groundwater system and the intermittently saturated stormflow system. The results of a baseflow sampling effort and a dye tracer study, indicated that much of the transport through the saturated groundwater system occurs along discrete geologic features. These features appear to be related to the contact between the Maryville and Nolichucky members of the Conasauga shale. Three discrete sources of tritium to Melton Branch Stream (MBS) were identified and traced to SWSA 5 by measuring soil moisture and evapotranspiration along transects between MBS and SWSA 5.
Date: March 1, 1989
Creator: Solomon, D.K.; Marsh, J.D.; Wickliff, D.S.; Larsen, I.L. & Clapp, R.B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

UCB-NE-107 user's manual

Description: The purpose of this manual is to provide users of UCB-NE-107 with the information necessary to use UCB-NE-107 effectively. UCB-NE-107 is a computer code for calculating the fractional rate of readily soluble radionuclides that are released from nuclear waste emplaced in water-saturated porous media. Waste placed in such environments will gradually dissolve. For many species such as actinides and rare earths, the process of dissolution is governed by the exterior flow field, and the chemical reaction rate or leaching rate. However, for readily soluble species such as /sup 135/Cs, /sup 137/Cs, and /sup 129/I, it has been observed that their dissolution rates are rapid. UCB-NE-107 is a code for calculating the release rate at the waste/rock interface, to check compliance with the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (USNRC) subsystem performance objective. It is an implementation of the analytic solution given below. 5 refs., 2 figs.
Date: March 1, 1989
Creator: Lee, W.W.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Chemical Technology Division annual technical report 1989

Description: Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1989 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including high-performance batteries (mainly lithium/iron sulfide and sodium/metal chloride), aqueous batteries (lead-acid and nickel/iron), and advanced fuel cells with molten carbonate and solid oxide electrolytes: (2) coal utilization, including the heat and seed recovery technology for coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics plants and the technology for fluidized-bed combustion; (3) methods for recovery of energy from municipal waste and techniques for treatment of hazardous organic waste; (4) nuclear technology related to a process for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste and for producing {sup 99}Mo from low-enriched uranium targets, the recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in a sodium-cooled fast reactor (the Integral Fast Reactor), and waste management; and (5) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also has a program in basic chemistry research in the areas of fluid catalysis for converting small molecules to desired products; materials chemistry for superconducting oxides and associated and ordered solutions at high temperatures; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, high-temperature superconductivity, and catalysis; and the geochemical processes responsible for trace-element migration within the earth's crust. The Division continued to be administratively responsible for and the major user of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL).
Date: March 1, 1990
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Proceedings of a symposium on the occasion of the 40th anniversary of the nuclear shell model

Description: This report contains papers on the following topics: excitation of 1p-1h stretched states with the (p,n) reaction as a test of shell-model calculations; on Z=64 shell closure and some high spin states of {sup 149}Gd and {sup 159}Ho; saturating interactions in {sup 4}He with density dependence; are short-range correlations visible in very large-basis shell-model calculations ; recent and future applications of the shell model in the continuum; shell model truncation schemes for rotational nuclei; the particle-hole interaction and high-spin states near A-16; magnetic moment of doubly closed shell +1 nucleon nucleus {sup 41}Sc(I{sup {pi}}=7/2{sup {minus}}); the new magic nucleus {sup 96}Zr; comparing several boson mappings with the shell model; high spin band structures in {sup 165}Lu; optical potential with two-nucleon correlations; generalized valley approximation applied to a schematic model of the monopole excitation; pair approximation in the nuclear shell model; and many-particle, many-hole deformed states.
Date: March 1, 1990
Creator: Lee, T. S. H. & Wiringa, R. B. (eds.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

An evaluation of the chemical, radiological, and ecological conditions of West Lake on the Hanford site

Description: West Lake and its immediate surrounding basin represent a unique habitat that is dominated by highly saline water and soil. The basin offers a valuable research site for studies of a rare and complex wetland area in the desert. This report is an evaluation of the chemical, radiological, and ecological conditions at West Lake and describes how ground water influences site properties. The scope of this evaluation consisted of a sampling program in 1989 and a review of data from the perspective of assessing the impact of Hanford Site operations on the physical, chemical, and ecological conditions of West Lake and its surrounding basin. The water level in West Lake fluctuates in relation to changes in the water table. The connection between West Lake and ground water is also supported by the presence of {sup 3}H and {sup 99}Tc in the ground water and in the lake. There are relatively high concentrations of uranium in West Lake; the highest concentrations are found in the northernmost isolated pool. Analyses of water, sediment, vegetation, and soil indicate possible shifts of isotropic ratios that indicate a reduction of {sup 235}U. Uranium-236 was not detected in West Lake water; its presence would indicate neutron-activated {sup 235}U from fuel reprocessing at Hanford. Trace metals are found at elevated concentrations in West Lake. Arsenic, chromium, copper, and zinc were found at levels in excess of US Environmental Protection Agency water quality criteria. Levels of radiological and chemical contamination in the West Lake basin are relatively low. Concentrations of fission isotopes exceed those that could be explained by atmospheric fallout, but fall short of action levels for active waste management areas. 31 refs., 8 figs., 18 tabs.
Date: March 1, 1991
Creator: Poston, T.M.; Price, K.L. & Newcomer, D.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Glass melter off-gas system pluggages: Cause, significance, and remediation

Description: Liquid high-level nuclear waste will be immobilized at the Savannah River Site (SRS) by vitrification in borosilicate glass. The glass will be produced in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) where the glass will be poured into stainless steel canisters for eventual disposal in a geologic repository. Experimental glass melters used to develop the vitrification process for immobilization of the waste have experienced problems with pluggage of the off-gas line with solid deposits. Off-gas deposits from the DWPF 1/2 Scale Glass Melter (SGM) and the 1/10th scale Integrated DWPF Melter System (IDMS) were determined to be mixtures of alkali rich chlorides, sulfates, borates, and fluorides with entrained Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, spinel, and frit particles. The distribution and location of the alkali deposits throughout the off-gas system indicate that the deposits form by vapor-phase transport and condensation. Condensation of the alkali-rich phases cement the entrained particulates causing off-gas system pluggages. The identification of vapor phase transport as the operational mechanism causing off-gas system pluggage indicates that deposition can be effectively eliminated by increasing the off-gas velocity. Scale glass melter operating experience indicates that a velocity of >50 fps is necessary in order to transport the volatile species to the quencher to prevent having condensation occur in the off-gas line. Hotter off-gas line temperatures would retain the alkali compounds as vapors so that they would remain volatile until they reach the quencher. However, hotter off-gas temperatures can only be achieved by using less air/steam flow at the off-gas entrance, e.g. at the off-gas film cooler (OGFC). This would result in lower off-gas velocities. Maintaining a high velocity is, therefore, considered to be a more important criterion for controlling off-gas pluggage than temperature control. 40 refs., 16 figs., 5 tabs.
Date: March 1, 1991
Creator: Jantzen, C.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project Monthly Report

Description: The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is being managed and conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under the direction of an independent Technical Steering Panel (TSP). The project is divided into the technical tasks which correspond to the path radionuclides followed, from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): source terms; environmental transport; environment monitoring data; demographics, agriculture, food habits; and environmental pathways and dose estimates. 3 figs., 2 tabs.
Date: March 1, 1991
Creator: Finch, S.M. (comp.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Iodine-131 in irradiated fuel at time of processing from December 1944 through December 1947

Description: The purpose of this document is to provide a record of the iodine-131 releases that were used as source terms in calculating the Phase 1 air pathway doses. The following table provides estimates of monthly iodine-131 releases to the atmosphere from the irradiated fuel processing plants for the time period December 1944 (the first month of dissolution of irradiated fuel from the Hanford Site) through December 1947. The estimated values of iodine-131 contained in the irradiated fuel at the time of processing were calculated using the best available information. Details of the calculations, including the assumptions required to obtain the values and the inherent uncertainties in the values, will be addressed in a Phase 2 HEDR report. The quantity of iodine-131 is released to the atmosphere is obtained by multiplying the calculated iodine-131 content of the fuel being dissolved by a release fraction. The actual release fraction value is uncertain. The release fractions assumed for iodine-131 were based on values that are expected to bound the actual release of iodine-131. The Phase 1 dose estimates from iodine-131 were based on a most probable release factor of 75% with an upward uncertainty bound of 85% and a lower uncertainty bound of 50%. The values shown in the table were input to the Phase 1 Modular Dose Calculation Model, which provided the air pathway doses. 1 tab.
Date: March 1, 1991
Creator: Heeb, C.M. & Morgan, L.G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Proposed plan for the United Nuclear Corporation Disposal Site at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

Description: The US Department of Energy (DOE) in compliance with Section 117(a) of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) of 1980, as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986, is releasing the proposed plan for remedial action at the United Nuclear Corporation (UNC) Disposal Site located at the DOE Oak Ridge Operations (ORO) Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The purpose of this document is to present and solicit for comment to the public and all interested parties the preferred plan'' to remediate the UNC Disposal Site. However, comments on all alternatives are invited.
Date: March 1, 1991
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department