23 Matching Results

Search Results

Advanced search parameters have been applied.

Natural Areas Analysis and Evaluation: Oak Ridge Reservation

Description: EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The Oak Ridge Reservation, encompassing 33,639 acres in the Valley and Ridge Physiographic Province of East Tennessee, has long been known for its unfragmented forests and high biodiversity. Many areas on the Reservation have been recognized as important natural areas, but no comprehensive treatment has been performed to evaluate the relative significance and importance of these areas compared to each other. The present study was conducted to develop a set of guidelines for evaluating the natural value of specific areas, to evaluate all the terrestrial areas that are currently delineated, and to rank all areas according to their relative biodiversity importance. All available data, reports and site-specific information relevant to Reservation lands, including Tennessee Division of Natural Areas database information, were evaluated and field work was conducted. Methodologies and criteria for assessment and evaluation of areas were developed; categories of criteria were devised; and a ranking system for evaluation of natural areas was produced. There were 70 areas evaluated during the study. The system is flexible, dynamic and easily revised to reflect updated and new information and interpretations. Eight categories of evaluation factors were established and used to characterize each site. These were the following: size of area, number or status taxa present, number of Endangered and Threatened taxa present, rarity of the Endangered and Threatened taxa on the Reservation, community diversity, site integrity and quality, disturbance and threat levels, and other significant features and factors. Each category generally consisted of a 5-point ranking scale from 0-4, allowing for a possible composite score of 32, with higher ranked, more important, sites attaining higher scores. Highly ranked sites are representative of regional natural diversity; contain outstanding natural features, communities or geology and/or very rare taxa or other elements; are relatively large in size with mature or old-growth community composition; ...
Date: November 2009
Creator: Baranski, Micahel J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Geophysical Surveys of a Known Karst Feature, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

Description: Geophysical data were acquired at a site on the Oak Ridge Reservation, Tennessee to determine the characteristics of a mud-filled void and to evaluate the effectiveness of a suite of geophysical methods at the site. Methods that were used included microgravity, electrical resistivity, and seismic refraction. Both microgravity and resistivity were able to detect the void as well as overlying structural features. The seismic data provide bedrock depth control for the other two methods, and show other effects that are caused by the void.
Date: November 14, 1999
Creator: Carpenter, P.J.; Carr, B.J.; Doll, W.E.; Kaufmann, R.D. & Nyquist, J.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Determination of effective porosity of mudrocks: a feasibility study

Description: Matrix diffusion is believed to be an important transport process within the double-porosity (primary sedimentary porosity and secondary fracture porosity) mudrock-dominated stratigraphic units on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Effective porosity is identified as an important parameter for evaluating and modeling matrix diffusion as a transport process. This report identifies, summarizes and evaluates petrophysical techniques, which can be used to determine the effective porosity of mudrock. Most of the techniques found their original application in the petroleum industry for the evaluation of reservoir rocks.
Date: November 1995
Creator: Dorsch, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Wetland and Sensitive Species Survey Report for Y-12: Proposed Uranium Processing Facility (UPF)

Description: This report summarizes the results of an environmental survey conducted at sites associated with the proposed Uranium Processing Facility (UPF) at the Y-12 National Security Complex in September-October 2009. The survey was conducted in order to evaluate potential impacts of the overall project. This project includes the construction of a haul road, concrete batch plant, wet soil storage area and dry soil storage area. The environmental surveys were conducted by natural resource experts at ORNL who routinely assess the significance of various project activities on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Natural resource staff assistance on this project included the collection of environmental information that can aid in project location decisions that minimize impacts to sensitive resource such as significant wildlife populations, rare plants and wetlands. Natural resources work was conducted in various habitats, corresponding to the proposed areas of impact. Thc credentials/qualifications of the researchers are contained in Appendix A. The proposed haul road traverses a number of different habitats including a power-line right-of-way. wetlands, streams, forest and mowed areas. It extends from what is known as the New Salvage Yard on the west to the Polaris Parking Lot on the east. This haul road is meant to connect the proposed concrete batch plant to the UPF building site. The proposed site of the concrete batch plant itself is a highly disturbed fenced area. This area of the project is shown in Fig. 1. The proposed Wet Soils Disposal Area is located on the north side of Bear Creek Road at the former Control Burn Study Area. This is a second growth arce containing thick vegetation, and extensive dead and down woody material. This area of the project is shown in Fig. 2. Thc dry soils storage area is proposed for what is currently known as the West Borrow Area. ...
Date: November 1, 2009
Creator: Giffen, N.; Peterson, M.; Reasor, S.; Pounds, L.; Byrd, G.; Wiest, M. C. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Preliminary screening of contaminants in the off-site surface water environment downstream of the US Department of Energy Oak Ridge Reservation. Environmental Restoration Program

Description: Previously reported concentrations of radionuclides and of inorganic and organic compounds in the surface water environment off-site of the US Department of Energy/Oak Ridge Reservation (DOE/ORR) suggest the presence of a large number of substances of possible concern to the protection of human health and the ecosystem. Screening of these data, as part of the initial scoping phase of the Clinch River Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Facility Investigation, is necessary to develop a field sampling plan for the acquisition of additional data through the identification of potential contaminants of concern for further evaluation and investigation. The results of this report are based on human health risk end points. For the purposes of screening, conservative and nonconservative estimates of potential maximum exposures were used to identify, respectively, definitely low- and definitely high-priority pollutants. Because of relatively high concentrations of contaminants in sediment, the presence of industrial and agricultural wastes not related to DOE/ORR operations, and the use of a lifetime risk for carcinogens of 10{sup {minus}6} as a lower screening criterion, no surface water reach considered in this study was identified as low priority. In contrast to this result, three contaminants, arsenic in water and thallium in fish of McCoy Branch and {sup 137}Cs in the sediment of the White Oak Creek embayment downstream from White Oak Lake, were tentatively identified as definitely high-priority substances. These locations are within the boundaries of ORR. Nonconservative estimates of exposure identified arsenic, antimony, thallium, uranium, polychlorinated biphenyls 1254 and 1260, chlordane, {sup 60}Co, and {sup 234}Pa as potentially high-priority contaminants in at least one or more locations. These are the contaminants that should receive the most scrutiny in future investigations.
Date: November 1, 1991
Creator: Hoffman, F. O.; Blaylock, B. G.; Frank, M. L.; Etnier, E. L.; Talmage, S. S. & Hook, L. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Preliminary screening of contaminants in the off-site surface water environment downstream of the US Department of Energy Oak Ridge Reservation

Description: Previously reported concentrations of radionuclides and of inorganic and organic compounds in the surface water environment off-site of the US Department of Energy/Oak Ridge Reservation (DOE/ORR) suggest the presence of a large number of substances of possible concern to the protection of human health and the ecosystem. Screening of these data, as part of the initial scoping phase of the Clinch River Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Facility Investigation, is necessary to develop a field sampling plan for the acquisition of additional data through the identification of potential contaminants of concern for further evaluation and investigation. The results of this report are based on human health risk end points. For the purposes of screening, conservative and nonconservative estimates of potential maximum exposures were used to identify, respectively, definitely low- and definitely high-priority pollutants. Because of relatively high concentrations of contaminants in sediment, the presence of industrial and agricultural wastes not related to DOE/ORR operations, and the use of a lifetime risk for carcinogens of 10{sup {minus}6} as a lower screening criterion, no surface water reach considered in this study was identified as low priority. In contrast to this result, three contaminants, arsenic in water and thallium in fish of McCoy Branch and {sup 137}Cs in the sediment of the White Oak Creek embayment downstream from White Oak Lake, were tentatively identified as definitely high-priority substances. These locations are within the boundaries of ORR. Nonconservative estimates of exposure identified arsenic, antimony, thallium, uranium, polychlorinated biphenyls 1254 and 1260, chlordane, {sup 60}Co, and {sup 234}Pa as potentially high-priority contaminants in at least one or more locations. These are the contaminants that should receive the most scrutiny in future investigations.
Date: November 1, 1991
Creator: Hoffman, F.O.; Blaylock, B.G.; Frank, M.L.; Etnier, E.L.; Talmage, S.S. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)) & Hook, L.A. (Science Applications International Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States))
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site Environmental Report Summary, 2002

Description: The ''State-of-the-Environment'' on and around the Oak Ridge Reservation is a mission of highest importance to the Department of Energy and our contractors. In order to be fully aware of the consequences of our operations and cleanup, an annual multimillion-dollar monitoring and surveillance program collects and analyzes tens of thousands of samples from air, surface and groundwater, soil, mud, plants, and animals. A mission of equal importance is to provide our stakeholders a complete understanding of this program. To do this we publish a detailed Annual Site Environmental Report and this summary document. The raw data is published separately in the Data Volume. All three documents can be found on the web, along with past documents, at http://www.ornl.gov/aser. Though I work on numerous technical documents throughout the year, no document is more important to me than the Annual Site Environmental Report and its Summary because: (1) they represent the efforts of many dedicated environmental scientists who carry out this extensive program, and who work hard to protect and enhance the environment; (2) they set out the programs in great detail to our legislatures, stakeholders, and the public; and (3) the Summary is directed to the public with the hope that the information is understandable and of value in gaining an accurate picture of the Oak Ridge Reservation as a neighbor. I thank the Karns High School students and their teacher for accepting my challenge in writing this Annual Site Environmental Report Summary, for thinking out of the box, for doing such a fine job, and for all the artwork and photographs (the morning coffee in the classroom was greatly appreciated, leaks and all). They were an especially enjoyable class to work with, and I hope you, our stakeholders and the public, find their efforts of value.
Date: November 25, 2003
Creator: Hughes, JF
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site Environmental Report Summary, 2004

Description: The Department of Energy (DOE) and our contractors strive to provide our stakeholders a comprehensive understanding of the consequences of DOE operations past and present. Toward this end a far-reaching multimillion-dollar annual monitoring and surveillance program collects and analyzes tens of thousands of air, surface and groundwater, soil, mud, plant, and animal samples. This effort represents the work of many dedicated environmental scientists who carry out these extensive programs and work hard to protect and enhance the environment. We publish the results in a detailed Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER), and a separate Data Volume for those who wish to see the supporting data. These documents present all the facts and figures, but are highly technical and not easily understood, and it's essential we provide a summary document simple to read and understand. So each year I team with Karns High School and ask students to write an Annual Site Environmental Report Summary that will be both informative and enjoyable to read. These environmental documents are perhaps the most important DOE reports because they explain the environmental monitoring programs and show the consequences of our operations in great detail to our legislatures, stakeholders, and the public. This ASER summary is written for you, the public, our most important stakeholder, with the hope that you find it comprehensible and of value in gaining an accurate understanding of the Oak Ridge Reservation. All three documents can be found on the web, along with previous publications, at http://www.ornl.gov/aser. It's a great pleasure to meet my new class each year and capture fresh creative ideas. I'm always delighted to see their interest and desire to learn and to produce a document for the public that reflects their personality and skills, and one the public will utilize and find of value. I sincerely thank these ...
Date: November 30, 2005
Creator: Hughes, JF
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Tracer-Level Radioactive Pilot-Scale Test of in Situ Vitrification Technology for the Stabilization of Contaminated Soil Sites at ORNL. Environmental Restoration Program

Description: This plan summarizes the activities to be performed during FY 1990 and FY 1991 for the tracer-level radioactive pilot-scale in situ vitrification (ISV) test. This test is the second step in evaluating ISV as a remedial action for the pits and trenches at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). A previous test used nonradioactive tracers for cesium and strontium. This new test will again use a one-half-scale model of trench 7 and the pilot-scale ISV equipment of Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). A small and precisely known amount of waste from a liquid waste disposal pit will be used for the test. An actually contaminated waste site cannot be used for this test because of the necessity to use an exactly known inventory of radionuclides so that a precise measurement of the volatilization of various constituents to the off-gas can be determined.
Date: November 1991
Creator: Jacobs, G. K. & Spalding, B. P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Tracer-level radioactive pilot-scale test of in situ vitrification technology for the stabilization of contaminated soil sites at ORNL

Description: This plan summarizes the activities to be performed during FY 1990 and FY 1991 for the tracer-level radioactive pilot-scale in situ vitrification (ISV) test. This test is the second step in evaluating ISV as a remedial action for the pits and trenches at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). A previous test used nonradioactive tracers for cesium and strontium. This new test will again use a one-half-scale model of trench 7 and the pilot-scale ISV equipment of Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). A small and precisely known amount of waste from a liquid waste disposal pit will be used for the test. An actually contaminated waste site cannot be used for this test because of the necessity to use an exactly known inventory of radionuclides so that a precise measurement of the volatilization of various constituents to the off-gas can be determined.
Date: November 1, 1991
Creator: Jacobs, G.K. & Spalding, B.P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Technology Evaluation for the Big Spring Water Treatment System at the Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

Description: The Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12 Complex) is an active manufacturing and developmental engineering facility that is located on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation. Building 9201-2 was one of the first process buildings constructed at the Y-12 Complex. Construction involved relocating and straightening of the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek (UEFPC) channel, adding large quantities of fill material to level areas along the creek, and pumping of concrete into sinkholes and solution cavities present within the limestone bedrock. Flow from a large natural spring designated as ''Big Spring'' on the original 1943 Stone & Webster Building 9201-2 Field Sketch FS6003 was captured and directed to UEFPC through a drainpipe designated Outfall 51. The building was used from 1953 to 1955 for pilot plant operations for an industrial process that involved the use of large quantities of elemental mercury. Past operations at the Y-12 Complex led to the release of mercury to the environment. Significant environmental media at the site were contaminated by accidental releases of mercury from the building process facilities piping and sumps associated with Y-12 Complex mercury handling facilities. Releases to the soil surrounding the buildings have resulted in significant levels of mercury in these areas of contamination, which is ultimately transported to UEFPC, its streambed, and off-site. Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC) is the DOE-Oak Ridge Operations prime contractor responsible for conducting environmental restoration activities at the Y-12 Complex. In order to mitigate the mercury being released to UEFPC, the Big Spring Water Treatment System will be designed and constructed as a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act action. This facility will treat the combined flow from Big Spring feeding Outfall 51 and the inflow now being processed at the East End Mercury Treatment System (EEMTS). Both discharge to UEFPC adjacent to ...
Date: November 1, 2002
Creator: LLC, Becthel Jacobs Company
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Supplement to a hydrologic framework for the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Summary of groundwater modeling

Description: The information in this report should prove useful for flow and contaminant-transport modeling of groundwater and for evaluating the alternatives for remedial action. New data on porosity and permeability have been analyzed and interpreted to produce a better understanding of the relationships between unfractured rock, low permeability intervals, and relatively permeable intervals. Specifically, the dimensions, orientations, depths, and spacings of pervious fractures have been measured or calculated; the depths and directions of subsurface flow paths (Solomon et al. 1992, pp. 3--21 to 3--23) have been corroborated with new data; fractures near the water table have been shown to have different characteristics than those at deeper levels; and the relationships between groundwater flows in fractures and flows in the continuum have been described. This is the information needed for the numerical modeling of groundwater flows. Other information in this report should result in a better understanding of spatial and temporal differences in water chemistry, including changes in contaminant concentrations. Temporal changes in groundwater chemistry have been shown to occur mostly near the water table. These changes consist of a periodic dilution of chemical constituents by recharge and a slow increase in constituent concentrations between recharge events. At discharge locations, spatial differences in groundwater chemistry are integrated by mixing. The monitoring of water chemistry in streams near contaminant sources may produce a better indication of contaminant releases and trends than do the records obtained from a few upgradient and downgradient wells.
Date: November 1, 1992
Creator: Moore, G. K. & Toran, L. E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Supplement to a hydrologic framework for the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

Description: The information in this report should prove useful for flow and contaminant-transport modeling of groundwater and for evaluating the alternatives for remedial action. New data on porosity and permeability have been analyzed and interpreted to produce a better understanding of the relationships between unfractured rock, low permeability intervals, and relatively permeable intervals. Specifically, the dimensions, orientations, depths, and spacings of pervious fractures have been measured or calculated; the depths and directions of subsurface flow paths (Solomon et al. 1992, pp. 3--21 to 3--23) have been corroborated with new data; fractures near the water table have been shown to have different characteristics than those at deeper levels; and the relationships between groundwater flows in fractures and flows in the continuum have been described. This is the information needed for the numerical modeling of groundwater flows. Other information in this report should result in a better understanding of spatial and temporal differences in water chemistry, including changes in contaminant concentrations. Temporal changes in groundwater chemistry have been shown to occur mostly near the water table. These changes consist of a periodic dilution of chemical constituents by recharge and a slow increase in constituent concentrations between recharge events. At discharge locations, spatial differences in groundwater chemistry are integrated by mixing. The monitoring of water chemistry in streams near contaminant sources may produce a better indication of contaminant releases and trends than do the records obtained from a few upgradient and downgradient wells.
Date: November 1, 1992
Creator: Moore, G.K. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering) & Toran, L.E. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The annual probability of an aircraft crash on the US Department of Energy reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee

Description: Aircraft hazards were evaluated to determine the total annual probability of an aircraft crash occurring at any structure located on the US Department of Energy (DOE) reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This report documents the use of an accepted methodology for calculating the probability of an aircraft crash as applied to the three Oak Ridge plant sites including the adjoining facilities. Based on the data contained herein, the evaluation concluded that the probability of an aircraft crash occurrence at a single facility is generally considered ``not credible`` as defined in DOE/OR-901. Additionally, reevaluation of probabilities would be necessary if significant changes were made to local air traffic. The probability of an aircraft crash could increase as a result of the opening of any new airport or heliport in the vicinity; a greater volume of air traffic from McGhee Tyson airport in Knoxville, should the airport status change from feeder airport to hub airport; the rerouting of commercial and/or military flights at the McGhee Tyson airport; and finally, a change in direction or the addition of a federal airway. At one time, DOE planned to establish a zone of prohibited airspace over the Y-12 plant; if the plans are enacted in the future, the probability of an aircraft crash at the Y-12 plant could decrease. Pilots since have been voluntarily requested not to fly below 3000 feet over the Y-12 plant. Also, the Federal Aviation Administration plans to reroute air traffic in the spring of 1993 on federal airway V16. However, the section of V16 which traverses the three plant sites and five adjoining facilities will not be altered. If this plan is implemented, the air traffic over the Oak Ridge facilities would not be affected significantly, and the probability of an aircraft crash as determined herein would be unchanged.
Date: November 1, 1992
Creator: Seigler, R. S. & Luttrell, L. J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Daytime multispectral scanner aerial surveys of the Oak Ridge Reservation, 1992--1994: Overview of data processing and analysis by the Environmental Restoration Remote Sensing Program, Fiscal year 1995

Description: Environmental Restoration (ER) Remote Sensing and Special Surveys Program was in 1992 to apply the benefits of remote sensing technologies to Environmental Restoration Management (ERWM) programs at all of the five United States Department of Energy facilities operated and managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (now Lockheed Martin Energy Systems)-the three Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) facilities, the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS)-and adjacent off-site areas. The Remote Sensing Program includes the management of routine and special surveys at these sites, application of state-of-the-art remote sensing and geophysical technologies, and data transformation, integration, and analyses required to make the information valuable to ER. Remotely-sensed data collected of the ORR include natural color and color infrared (IR) aerial photography, 12-band multispectral scanner imagery, predawn thermal IR sensor imagery, magnetic and electromagnetic geophysical surveys, and gamma radiological data.
Date: November 1, 1995
Creator: Smyre, J.L.; Hodgson, M.E.; Moll, B.W.; King, A.L. & Cheng, Yang
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Task plan for TARA-II compaction and grouting demonstration. Environmental Restoration Program

Description: This task directly supports the corrective measures evaluation for the closure of Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 but also supports technology development for the closure of other Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) SWSAs and waste management units. Previous demonstrations have established the effectiveness of dynamic compaction and in situ grouting in stabilizing burial trenches against subsidence, which would otherwise compromise the support of infiltration barrier structures designed to protect buried waste from leaching. In situ grouting with polyacrylamide has also been demonstrated to improve the hydrologic isolation of buried waste. Both of these stabilization techniques have been demonstrated on burial trenches that are situated well above the water table and, hence, are in a chronic unsaturated moisture regime. Further demonstrations of these shallow-land burial trench stabilization techniques are necessary to establish their effectiveness and safety when applied to burial trenches that are chronically inundated with groundwater.
Date: November 1, 1991
Creator: Spalding, B. P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Task plan for TARA-II compaction and grouting demonstration

Description: This task directly supports the corrective measures evaluation for the closure of Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 but also supports technology development for the closure of other Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) SWSAs and waste management units. Previous demonstrations have established the effectiveness of dynamic compaction and in situ grouting in stabilizing burial trenches against subsidence, which would otherwise compromise the support of infiltration barrier structures designed to protect buried waste from leaching. In situ grouting with polyacrylamide has also been demonstrated to improve the hydrologic isolation of buried waste. Both of these stabilization techniques have been demonstrated on burial trenches that are situated well above the water table and, hence, are in a chronic unsaturated moisture regime. Further demonstrations of these shallow-land burial trench stabilization techniques are necessary to establish their effectiveness and safety when applied to burial trenches that are chronically inundated with groundwater.
Date: November 1, 1991
Creator: Spalding, B.P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Survey of protected terrestrial vertebrates on the Oak Ridge Reservation 1995 annual progress report

Description: This progress report discusses surveys of protected terrestrial vertebrates on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) from October 1994 through September 1995. These surveys are important to help avoid or minimize potential impacts of projects on the ORR to species listed as threatened, endangered, or in need of management by the US Fish and Wildlife Service and the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency. Currently, there are 69 species of federally or state-listed terrestrial vertebrates that may occur in Tennessee. Not all of these are expected to occur on the ORR, nor do resources permit comprehensive sampling for all of them over the entire ORR. To effectively organize sampling efforts, listed animal species that might be present were targeted using a prioritization system based on historical and recent sightings, species distributions, literature reviews, and personal communications. Sampling was conducted during the time of the year when each targeted species would most likely be encountered. Several trapping and surveying methods were used, including pitfall traps, Sherman traps, seining, artificial covers, and cave and avian surveys.
Date: November 1, 1995
Creator: Vail, E.R.; Mitchell, J.M.; Webb, J.W.; King, A.L. & Hamlett, P.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Oak Ridge Reservation, annual site environmental report for 1993

Description: The US DOE currently oversees activities on the Oak Ridge Reservation, a government-owned, contractor-operated facility. Three sites compose the reservation; Y-12, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and K-25. This document contains a summary of environmental monitoring activities on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and its surroundings. The results summarized in this report are based on the data collected during calendar year (CY) 1993 and compiled in; Environmental Monitoring in the Oak Ridge Reservation: CY 1993 Results. Annual environmental monitoring on the ORR consists of two major activities: effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance. Effluent monitoring is the collection and analysis of samples or measurements of liquid, gaseous, or airborne effluents for the purpose of characterizing and quantifying contaminants and process stream characteristics, assessing radiation and chemical exposures to members of the public, and demonstrating compliance with applicable standards. Environmental surveillance is the collection and analysis of samples of air, water, soil, foodstuffs, biota, and other media from DOE sites and their environs and the measurement of external radiation for purposes of demonstrating compliance with applicable standards, assessing radiation and chemical exposures to members of the public, and assessing effects, if any, on the local environment.
Date: November 1, 1994
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Oak Ridge reservation, annual site environmental report summary for 1993

Description: The U.S. Department of Energy requires annual site environmental reports from facilities that operate under its auspices. To fulfill that requirement, such an annual report is published for the Oak Ridge Reservation, which comprises three major sites, each of which has unique monitoring requirements in addition to many shared obligations. As a result, the report is complex and highly detailed. Annual site environmental reports are public documents that are read by government regulators, scientists, engineers, business people, special interest groups, and members of the public at large. For that reason, the reports need to be accessible to a variety of audiences in addition to being accurate and complete. This pamphlet summarizes environmental activities on the reservation, which for some readers may be adequate; for those who seek more detail, it will lend coherence to their approach to the report itself. The content of this summary was taken from Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site Environmental Report for 1993. Results of the many environmental monitoring and surveillance activities are detailed in this report.
Date: November 1, 1994
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Post construction report for Lower East Fork Poplar Creek Project, Phase 1, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

Description: This Phase 1 Remedial Action (RA) effort was conducted in accordance with the Record of Decision (ROD) for Lower East Fork Poplar Creek (LEFPC) as a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act action. The LEFPC, Phase 1 RA removed approximately 5,560 yd{sup 3} of mercury-contaminated soils, {ge} 400 ppm, from selected portions of the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) site LEFPC floodplain from July 8, 1996--September 14, 1996. During excavation activities, pockets of elevated radiologically contaminated soils (greater than 35 pCi/g) were located by the continuous monitoring of the excavation areas and contaminated soils with radiological monitoring instruments. Through characterization sampling it has been determined that {approximately} 90 yd{sup 3} are less than 35 pCi/g uranium contaminated and will be transported to the Y-12 Landfill V for disposal and the remaining {approximately}40 yd{sup 3} do not meet the WAC for radiological constituents included in the Special Waste Permit for Landfill V. The radiologically contaminated soil will be placed in 21st Century containers for storage at the K-25 site.
Date: November 1, 1996
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Technical specification for transferring National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System water data to the Oak Ridge Environmental Information System

Description: The primary goal of this technical specification is to meet the consolidated environmental data requirements defined by the Federal Facility (FFA) and the Tennessee Oversight Agreement (TOA) as they pertain to NPDES surface water data maintained in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, by the Department of Energy`s Maintenance and Operations (M&O) contractor Martin Marietta Energy Systems and prime contractors to DOE. This technical specification describes the organizational responsibilities for getting NPDES data into OREIS, describes the logical data transfer file required from NPDES, addresses business rules and submission rules, describes the physical data transfer file, addresses configuration control of this technical specification, and addresses required changes to the current OREIS data base structure due to the requirements of NPDES.
Date: November 1996
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

White Oak Creek watershed: Melton Valley area Remedial Investigation report, at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee: Volume 2, Appendixes A and B

Description: This document contains Appendixes A ``Source Inventory Information for the Subbasins Evaluated for the White Oak Creek Watershed`` and B ``Human Health Risk Assessment for White Oak Creek / Melton Valley Area`` for the remedial investigation report for the White Oak Creek Watershed and Melton Valley Area. Appendix A identifies the waste types and contaminants for each subbasin in addition to the disposal methods. Appendix B identifies potential human health risks and hazards that may result from contaminants present in the different media within Oak Ridge National Laboratory sites.
Date: November 1, 1996
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department