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ELECTRON BEAM ION SOURCE PREINJECTOR PROJECT (EBIS) CONCEPTUAL DESIGN REPORT.

Description: This report describes a new heavy ion pre-injector for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) based on a high charge state Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator, and a short Linac. The highly successful development of an EBIS at BNL now makes it possible to replace the present pre-injector that is based on an electrostatic Tandem with a reliable, low maintenance Linac-based pre-injector. Linac-based pre-injectors are presently used at most accelerator and collider facilities with the exception of RHIC, where the required gold beam intensities could only be met with a Tandem until the recent EBIS development. EBIS produces high charge state ions directly, eliminating the need for the two stripping foils presently used with the Tandem. Unstable stripping efficiencies of these foils are a significant source of luminosity degradation in RHIC. The high reliability and flexibility of the new Linac-based pre-injector will lead to increased integrated luminosity at RHIC and is an essential component for the long-term success of the RHIC facility. This new pre-injector, based on an EBIS, also has the potential for significant future intensity increases and can produce heavy ion beams of all species including uranium beams and, as part of a future upgrade, might also be used to produce polarized {sup 3}He beams. These capabilities will be critical to the future luminosity upgrades and electron-ion collisions in RHIC. The new RFQ and Linac that are used to accelerate beams from the EBIS to an energy sufficient for injection into the Booster are both very similar to existing devices already in operation at other facilities. Injection into the Booster will occur at the same location as the existing injection from the Tandem.
Date: February 28, 2005
Creator: ALESSI, J.; BARTON, D.; BEEBE, E.; GASSNER, D. & AL., ET
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

An Order-of-Magnitude Estimation of Benzene Concentration in Saltstone Vault

Description: The contents of Tank 48 that include the tetraphenylborate (TPB) precipitates of potassium and cesium will be grouted and stored in the Saltstone vault. The grouting process is exothermic, which should accelerate the decomposition of TPB precipitates eventually to benzene. Because the vault is not currently outfitted with an active ventilation system, there is a concern that a mixture of flammable gases may form in the vapor space of each cell filled with the curing grout. The purpose of this study was to determine if passive breathing induced by the diurnal oscillations of atmospheric pressure would provide any mitigating measure against potential flammability. Specifically, it was requested that a set of algorithms be developed that would predict the equilibrium concentration of benzene as a function of benzene generation rate, fill height, and the amplitude of the barometric pressure oscillations. These algorithms were to be derived based on several simplifying assumptions so that order of magnitude estimates could be made quickly for scoping purposes. This memo documents the resulting algorithms along with those key assumptions made. These algorithms were then applied to simulate several test cases, including the baseline case where the cell was filled to the maximum height of 25 ft at the bulk benzene generation rate of 3.4 g/hr.
Date: February 28, 2005
Creator: ALEXANDER, CHOI
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Evaluation of Ultra Clean Fuels from Natural Gas

Description: ConocoPhillips, in conjunction with Nexant Inc., Penn State University, and Cummins Engine Co., joined with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) in a cooperative agreement to perform a comprehensive study of new ultra clean fuels (UCFs) produced from remote sources of natural gas. The project study consists of three primary tasks: an environmental Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), a Market Study, and a series of Engine Tests to evaluate the potential markets for Ultra Clean Fuels. The overall objective of DOE's Ultra Clean Transportation Fuels Initiative is to develop and deploy technologies that will produce ultra-clean burning transportation fuels for the 21st century from both petroleum and non-petroleum resources. These fuels will: (1) Enable vehicles to comply with future emission requirements; (2) Be compatible with the existing liquid fuels infrastructure; (3) Enable vehicle efficiencies to be significantly increased, with concomitantly reduced CO{sub 2} emissions; (4) Be obtainable from a fossil resource, alone or in combination with other hydrocarbon materials such as refinery wastes, municipal wastes, biomass, and coal; and (5) Be competitive with current petroleum fuels. The objectives of the ConocoPhillips Ultra Clean Fuels Project are to perform a comprehensive life cycle analysis and to conduct a market study on ultra clean fuels of commercial interest produced from natural gas, and, in addition, perform engine tests for Fisher-Tropsch diesel and methanol in neat, blended or special formulations to obtain data on emissions. This resulting data will be used to optimize fuel compositions and engine operation in order to minimize the release of atmospheric pollutants resulting from the fuel combustion. Development and testing of both direct and indirect methanol fuel cells was to be conducted and the optimum properties of a suitable fuel-grade methanol was to be defined. The results of the study are also applicable to ...
Date: February 28, 2006
Creator: Abbott, Robert; Casey, Edward; Esen, Etop; Smith, Douglas; Burke, Bruce; Nguyen, Binh et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

IUPAC-NIST Solubility Data Series. 98. Solubility of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Pure and Organic Solvent Mixtures: Revised and Updated. Part 1. Binary Solvent Mixtures

Description: Article on the solubility of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in pure and organic solvent mixtures. This work updates volumes 54, 58, and 59 in the IUPAC Solubility Data Series and presents solubility data for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon solutes dissolved in binary organic solvent mixtures.
Date: February 28, 2013
Creator: Acree, William E. (William Eugene)
Partner: UNT College of Arts and Sciences

IUPAC-NIST Solubility Data Series. 98. Solubility of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Pure and Organic Solvent Mixtures: Revised and Updated. Part 2. Ternary Solvent Mixtures

Description: Article on the solubility of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in pure and organic solvent mixtures. This work updates volumes 54, 58, and 59 in the IUPAC Solubility Data Series and presents solubility data for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon solutes dissolved in ternary organic solvent mixtures.
Date: February 28, 2013
Creator: Acree, William E. (William Eugene)
Partner: UNT College of Arts and Sciences

[Nat Adderly Lecture, February 28, 1984: Part 1]

Description: Jazz Lecture Series presentation by Nat Adderly on February 28, 1984 at 9:30AM at the UNT College of Music. Includes lecture and performance by Nat Adderley, interspersed with questions from the audience.
Access: This item is restricted to UNT Community Members. Login required if off-campus.
Date: February 28, 1984
Creator: Adderley, Nat, 1931-2000
Partner: UNT Music Library

[Nat Adderly Lecture, February 28, 1984: Part 2]

Description: Jazz Lecture Series presentation by Nat Adderly on February 28, 1984 at 2:00PM at the UNT College of Music. Includes lecture and performance by Nat Adderley, interspersed with questions from the audience.
Access: This item is restricted to UNT Community Members. Login required if off-campus.
Date: February 28, 1984
Creator: Adderley, Nat, 1931-2000
Partner: UNT Music Library

Nuclear Energy Research Initiative Project No. 02 103 Innovative Low Cost Approaches to Automating QA/QC of Fuel Particle Production Using On Line Nondestructive Methods for Higher Reliability Final Project Report

Description: This Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI) project was tasked with exploring, adapting, developing and demonstrating innovative nondestructive test methods to automate nuclear coated particle fuel inspection so as to provide the United States (US) with necessary improved and economical Quality Assurance and Control (QA/QC) that is needed for the fuels for several reactor concepts being proposed for both near term deployment [DOE NE & NERAC, 2001] and Generation IV nuclear systems. Replacing present day QA/QC methods, done manually and in many cases destructively, with higher speed automated nondestructive methods will make fuel production for advanced reactors economically feasible. For successful deployment of next generation reactors that employ particle fuels, or fuels in the form of pebbles based on particles, extremely large numbers of fuel particles will require inspection at throughput rates that do not significantly impact the proposed manufacturing processes. The focus of the project is nondestructive examination (NDE) technologies that can be automated for production speeds and make either: (I) On Process Measurements or (II) In Line Measurements. The inspection technologies selected will enable particle “quality” qualification as a particle or group of particles passes a sensor. A multiple attribute dependent signature will be measured and used for qualification or process control decisions. A primary task for achieving this objective is to establish standard signatures for both good/acceptable particles and the most problematic types of defects using several nondestructive methods.
Date: February 28, 2006
Creator: Ahmed, Salahuddin; Batishko, Charles R.; Flake, Matthew; Good, Morris S.; Mathews, Royce; Morra, Marino et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The grand challenge of managing the petascale facility.

Description: This report is the result of a study of networks and how they may need to evolve to support petascale leadership computing and science. As Dr. Ray Orbach, director of the Department of Energy's Office of Science, says in the spring 2006 issue of SciDAC Review, 'One remarkable example of growth in unexpected directions has been in high-end computation'. In the same article Dr. Michael Strayer states, 'Moore's law suggests that before the end of the next cycle of SciDAC, we shall see petaflop computers'. Given the Office of Science's strong leadership and support for petascale computing and facilities, we should expect to see petaflop computers in operation in support of science before the end of the decade, and DOE/SC Advanced Scientific Computing Research programs are focused on making this a reality. This study took its lead from this strong focus on petascale computing and the networks required to support such facilities, but it grew to include almost all aspects of the DOE/SC petascale computational and experimental science facilities, all of which will face daunting challenges in managing and analyzing the voluminous amounts of data expected. In addition, trends indicate the increased coupling of unique experimental facilities with computational facilities, along with the integration of multidisciplinary datasets and high-end computing with data-intensive computing; and we can expect these trends to continue at the petascale level and beyond. Coupled with recent technology trends, they clearly indicate the need for including capability petascale storage, networks, and experiments, as well as collaboration tools and programming environments, as integral components of the Office of Science's petascale capability metafacility. The objective of this report is to recommend a new cross-cutting program to support the management of petascale science and infrastructure. The appendices of the report document current and projected DOE computation facilities, science trends, and ...
Date: February 28, 2007
Creator: Aiken, R. J. & Science, Mathematics and Computer
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Characterizing the fabric of the urban environment: A case study of Salt Lake City, Utah

Description: Urban fabric data are needed in order to estimate the impact of light-colored surfaces (roofs and pavements) and urban vegetation (trees, grass, shrubs) on the meteorology and air quality of a city, and to design effective implementation programs. In this report, we discuss the result of a semi-automatic Monte-Carlo statistical approach used to develop data on surface-type distribution and city-fabric makeup (percentage of various surface-types) using aerial color orthophotography. The digital aerial photographs for Salt Lake City covered a total of about 34 km2 (13 mi2). At 0.50-m resolution, there were approximately 1.4 x 108 pixels of data. Four major land-use types were examined: (1) commercial, (2) industrial, (3) educational, and (4) residential. On average, for the areas studied, vegetation covers about 46 percent of the area (ranging 44-51 percent), roofs cover about 21 percent (ranging 15-24 percent), and paved surfaces about 26 percent (ranging 21-28 percent). For the most part, trees shade streets, parking lots, grass, and sidewalks. In most non-residential areas, paved surfaces cover 46-66 percent of the area. In residential areas, on average, paved surfaces cover about 32 percent of the area. Land-use/land-cover (LU/LC) data from the United States Geological Survey were used to extrapolate these results from neighborhood scales to metropolitan Salt Lake City. In an area of roughly 560 km2, defining most of metropolitan Salt Lake City, over 60 percent is residential. The total roof area is about 110 km2, and the total paved surface area (roads, parking areas, sidewalks) covers about 170 km2. The total vegetated area covers about 230 km2.
Date: February 28, 2001
Creator: Akbari, Hashem & Rose, L. Shea
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Radiation dose measurements of the insertion devices

Description: The Advanced Photon Source (APS) uses Nd-Fe-B permanent magnets in the insertion devices to produce x-rays for scientific research. Earlier investigations have exhibited varying degrees of demagnetization of these magnets due to irradiation from electron beams, {sup 60}Co {gamma}-rays, and high-energy neutrons. Although no detectable radiation-induced demagnetization has been observed in the APS insertion devices so far, partial demagnetization has been observed in at lest one insertion device at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), where Nd-Fe-B permanent magnets are also used. A growing concern for the APS insertion devices, as well as the permanent magnets that will be used in next generation high-power light sources, like the FEL, resulted from the partial demagnetization observed in the ESRF devices. This concern in relation to radiation-induced demagnetization spurred a long-term project aimed to measure and analyze the total absorbed doses received by the APS insertion devices. The project required a reliable photon high dose dosimetry technique capable of measuring absorbed doses greater than 10{sup 6} rad, which was not readily available at the APS. Through a collaboration with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), one such technique using radiachromic films was considered, tested, and calibrated at the APS. This consequently led to the implementation of radiachromic films as the technique of choice for measuring the total absorbed doses received by the insertion devices for each of the APS runs.
Date: February 28, 2000
Creator: Alderman, J.; Semones, E. & Job, P.K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Some fundamental aspects of fault-tree and digraph-matrix relationships for a systems-interaction evaluation procedure

Description: Recent events, such as Three Mile Island-2, Brown's Ferry-3, and Crystal River-3, have demonstrated that complex accidents can occur as a result of dependent (common-cause/mode) failures. These events are now being called Systems Interactions. A procedure for the identification and evaluation of Systems Interactions is being developed by the NRC. Several national laboratories and utilities have contributed preliminary procedures. As a result, there are several important views of the Systems Interaction problem. This report reviews some fundamental mathematical background of both fault-oriented and success-oriented risk analyses in order to bring out the advantages and disadvantages of each. In addition, it outlines several fault-oriented/dependency analysis approaches and several success-oriented/digraph-matrix approaches. The objective is to obtain a broad perspective of present options for solving the Systems Interaction problem.
Date: February 28, 1982
Creator: Alesso, H.P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Gray Wolves Under the Endangered Species Act: Distinct Population Segments and Experimental Populations

Description: This report analyzes the distinct population segments (DPS) designation process as it is applied to the gray wolf. It also examines experimental populations of wolves under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) and their protections.
Date: February 28, 2011
Creator: Alexander, Kristina & Corn, M. L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Gravi-Leptogenesis: Leptogenesis From Gravity Waves in Pseudo-Scalar Driven Inflation Models

Description: In this talk we present a mechanism for leptogenesis which is based on gravity waves produced during inflation. We show that when inflation is driven by a pseudo-scalar field the metric perturbations generated during inflation can become birefringent, therefore giving a non-vanishing contribution to the gravitational triangle anomaly and sourcing lepton anti-lepton asymmetry. As this asymmetry is sourced by the fields which are active during inflation, it is not washed out or diluted by inflation. The amount of matter asymmetry generated in our model can be of realistic size for the parameters within the range of some inflationary scenarios and grand unified theories.
Date: February 28, 2007
Creator: Alexander, S.H.; U., /Penn State; Peskin, Michael E.; /SLAC; Sheikh-Jabbari, M.M. & /IPM, Tehran
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Ready, set, go . . . well maybe

Description: The agenda for this presentation is: (1) understand organizational readiness for changes; (2) review benefits and challenges of change; (3) share case studies of ergonomic programs that were 'not ready' and some that were 'ready'; and (4) provide some ideas for facilitating change.
Date: February 28, 2011
Creator: Alexandre, Melanie M & Bartolome, Terri-Lynn C
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Efficient Windows Collaborative: Research Tool Dissemination to Increase Energy Efficient Fenestration Product Penetration

Description: The project goals covered both the residential and commercial windows markets and involved a range of audiences such as window manufacturers, builders, homeowners, design professionals, utilities, and public agencies. Essential goals included: (1) Creation of 'Master Toolkits' of information that integrate diverse tools, rating systems, and incentive programs, customized for key audiences such as window manufacturers, design professionals, and utility programs. (2) Delivery of education and outreach programs to multiple audiences through conference presentations, publication of articles for builders and other industry professionals, and targeted dissemination of efficient window curricula to professionals and students. (3) Design and implementation of mechanisms to encourage and track sales of more efficient products through the existing Window Products Database as an incentive for manufacturers to improve products and participate in programs such as NFRC and ENERGY STAR. (4) Development of utility incentive programs to promote more efficient residential and commercial windows. Partnership with regional and local entities on the development of programs and customized information to move the market toward the highest performing products. An overarching project goal was to ensure that different audiences adopt and use the developed information, design and promotion tools and thus increase the market penetration of energy efficient fenestration products. In particular, a crucial success criterion was to move gas and electric utilities to increase the promotion of energy efficient windows through demand side management programs as an important step toward increasing the market share of energy efficient windows.
Date: February 28, 2010
Creator: Alliance to Save Energy (U.S.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

NUCLEON-MESON CASCADE CALCULATIONS: TRANSVERSE SHIELDING FOR A 45-Gev ELECTRON ACCELERATOR. PART II

Description: In a previous report nucleon-meson cascade calculations were carried out for several cases of interest in the design of the transverse shield for the proposed 45-Bev linear electron accelerator at Starford University. In this report results are given for several additional cases. Muon, neutron, pion, and proton intensities as function of energy and distance for varying angles are given. Corresponding doses are also included. (D.C.W.)
Date: February 28, 1963
Creator: Alsmiller, Jr., R. G.; Alsmiller, F. S. & Murphy, J. E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Hazard categorization of 100K East and 100K West in-basin fuel characterization program activities. Revision 1

Description: This report provides a hazard categorization of the 105 K East and 105 K West in-basin activities associated with the fuel sampling and transport preparations. It is limited to those characterization activities performed in the 105 KE and 105 KW fuel storage basin structures. The methodology of DOE standard DOE-STD-10227-92 is used. The report documents the determination that the in-basin activities associated with the fuel characterization program are classified as Hazard Category 3 (hazard analysis shows the potential for only significant localized consequences).
Date: February 28, 1995
Creator: Alwardt, L.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Plasma and Ion Assistance in Physical Vapor Deposition: AHistorical Perspective

Description: Deposition of films using plasma or plasma-assist can betraced back surprisingly far, namely to the 18th century for arcs and tothe 19th century for sputtering. However, only since the 1960s thecoatings community considered other processes than evaporation for largescale commercial use. Ion Plating was perhaps the first importantprocess, introducing vapor ionization and substrate bias to generate abeam of ions arriving on the surface of the growing film. Ratherindependently, cathodic arc deposition was established as an energeticcondensation process, first in the former Soviet Union in the 1970s, andin the 1980s in the Western Hemisphere. About a dozen various ion-basedcoating technologies evolved in the last decades, all characterized byspecific plasma or ion generation processes. Gridded and gridless ionsources were taken from space propulsion and applied to thin filmdeposition. Modeling and simulation have helped to make plasma and ionseffects to be reasonably well understood. Yet--due to the complex, oftennon-linear and non-equilibrium nature of plasma and surfaceinteractions--there is still a place for the experience plasma"sourcerer."
Date: February 28, 2007
Creator: Anders, Andre
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department