60 Matching Results

Search Results

Advanced search parameters have been applied.

Type 1 Frequency Doubling at 1064 nm in LaCa40(B03)3 (LaCOB), GdCa40(B03)3(GdCOB), and YCa40(B03)3(YCOB)

Description: We have grown and characterized LaCOB, a new member to the GdCOB family of nonlinear crystals. LaCOB has a d{sub eff} of 0.52 {plus_minus} 0.05 pm/V and an angular sensitivity of 1224 {plus_minus} 184 (cm-rad){sup -1} for type I frequency doubling at 1064 nm. The d{sub {alpha}{beta}{beta}} and d{sub {gamma}{beta}{beta}} coefficients of the nonlinear optical tensor for LaCOB, GdCOB, and YCOB were determined to have values of {vert_bar}0.26 {plus_minus} 0.04{vert_bar} pm/V and |1.69 {plus_minus} 0.17| pm/V, respectively. Results of phase-matching angle measurements at 1064 nm and 1047 nm predict LaCOB to be non-critically phase-matched (NCPM) at 1042 {plus_minus} 1.5 nm. We also estimate the thermal sensitivity of LaCOB to be less than 0.1 (cm- C){sup -1}.
Date: March 7, 2001
Creator: Adams, J J; Ebbers, C A; Schaffers, K I & Payne, S A
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Ultrabright Laser-based MeV-class Light Source

Description: We report first light from a novel, new source of 10-ps 0.776-MeV gamma-ray pulses known as T-REX (Thomson-Radiated Extreme X-rays). The MeV-class radiation produced by TREX is unique in the world with respect to its brightness, spectral purity, tunability, pulse duration and laser-like beam character. With T-REX, one can use photons to efficiently probe and excite the isotope-dependent resonant structure of atomic nucleus. This ability will be enabling to an entirely new class of isotope-specific, high resolution imaging and detection capabilities.
Date: April 2, 2008
Creator: Albert, F; Anderson, G; Anderson, S; Bayramian, A; Berry, B; Betts, S et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Full System Operations of Mercury; A Diode-Pumped Solid-State Laser

Description: Operation of the Mercury laser with two amplifiers activated has yielded 30 Joules at 1 Hz and 12 Joules at 10 Hz and over 8 x 10{sup 4} shots on the system. Static distortions in the Yb:S-FAP amplifiers were corrected by magneto rheological finishing technique.
Date: September 23, 2004
Creator: Bayramian, A J; Armstrong, P; Beach, R J; Bibeau, C; Campbell, R; Ebbers, C A et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Frequency Conversion Activation on the Mercury Laser

Description: High efficiency frequency conversion while operating at average power is critical for the Mercury laser. We will demonstrate average power frequency conversion of face-cooled DKDP and YCOB crystals using a sapphire heat spreader approach.
Date: September 24, 2004
Creator: Bayramian, A J; Beach, R J; Bibeau, C; Campbell, R; Ebbers, C A; Freitas, B L et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Activation of theMercury Laser System: A Diode-Pumped Solid-State Laser Driver for Inertial Fusion

Description: Initial measurements are reported for the Mercury laser system, a scalable driver for rep-rated inertial fusion energy. The performance goals include 10% electrical efficiency at 10 Hz and 100 J with a 2-10 ns pulse length. We report on the first Yb:S-FAP crystals grown to sufficient size for fabricating full size (4 x 6 cm) amplifier slabs. The first of four 160 kW (peak power) diode arrays and pump delivery systems were completed and tested with the following results: 5.5% power droop over a 0.75 ms pulse, 3.95 nm spectral linewidth, far field divergence of 14.0 mrad and 149.5 mrad in the microlensed and unmicrolensed directions respectively, and 83% optical-to-optical transfer efficiency through the pump delivery system.
Date: September 10, 2001
Creator: Bayramian, A J; Beach, R J; Bibeau, C; Ebbers, C A; Freitas, B L; Kanz, V K et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Activation of the Mercury Laser: A Diode-Pumped Solid-State Laser Driver for Inertial Fusion

Description: Initial measurements are reported for the Mercury laser system, a scalable driver for rep-rated high energy density physics research. The performance goals include 10% electrical efficiency at 10 Hz and 100 J with a 2-10 ns pulse length. This laser is an angularly multiplexed 4-pass gas-cooled amplifier system based on image relaying to minimize wavefront distortion and optical damage risk at the 10 Hz operating point. The efficiency requirements are fulfilled using diode laser pumping of ytterbium doped strontium fluorapatite crystals.
Date: March 7, 2001
Creator: Bayramian, A J; Bibeau, C; Beach, R J; Chanteloup, J C; Ebbers, C A; Kanz, K et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Activation of the mercury laser: a diode-pumped solid-state laser driver for inertial fusion

Description: Initial measurements are reported for the Mercury laser system, a scalable driver for rep-rated high energy density physics research. The performance goals include 10% electrical efficiency at 10 Hz and 100 J with a 2-10 ns pulse length.
Date: September 19, 2000
Creator: Bayramian, A J; Bibeau, C; Beach, R J; Ebbers, C A; Kanz, K; Nakano, H et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A Laser Technology Test Facility for Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE)

Description: A LIFE laser driver needs to be designed and operated which meets the rigorous requirements of the NIF laser system while operating at high average power, and operate for a lifetime of >30 years. Ignition on NIF will serve to demonstrate laser driver functionality, operation of the Mercury laser system at LLNL demonstrates the ability of a diode-pumped solid-state laser to run at high average power, but the operational lifetime >30 yrs remains to be proven. A Laser Technology test Facility (LTF) has been designed to specifically address this issue. The LTF is a 100-Hz diode-pumped solid-state laser system intended for accelerated testing of the diodes, gain media, optics, frequency converters and final optics, providing system statistics for billion shot class tests. These statistics will be utilized for material and technology development as well as economic and reliability models for LIFE laser drivers.
Date: October 6, 2009
Creator: Bayramian, A J; Campbell, R W; Ebbers, C A; Freitas, B L; Latkowski, J; Molander, W A et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

FY96-98 Summary Report Mercury: Next Generation Laser for High Energy Density Physics SI-014

Description: The scope of the Mercury Laser project encompasses the research, development, and engineering required to build a new generation of diode-pumped solid-state lasers for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). The Mercury Laser will be the first integrated demonstration of laser diodes, crystals, and gas cooling within a scalable laser architecture. This report is intended to summarize the progress accomplished during the first three years of the project. Due to the technological challenges associated with production of 900 nm diode-bars, heatsinks, and high optical-quality Yb:S-FAP crystals, the initial focus of the project was primarily centered on the R&D in these three areas. During the third year of the project, the R&D continued in parallel with the development of computer codes, partial activation of the laser, component testing, and code validation where appropriate.
Date: May 25, 2000
Creator: Bayramian, A.; Beach, R.; Bibeau, C.; Chanteloup, J.-C.; Ebbers, C.; Emanuel, M. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Mercury Project: A High Average Power, Gas-Cooled Laser For Inertial Fusion Energy Development

Description: Hundred-joule, kilowatt-class lasers based on diode-pumped solid-state technologies, are being developed worldwide for laser-plasma interactions and as prototypes for fusion energy drivers. The goal of the Mercury Laser Project is to develop key technologies within an architectural framework that demonstrates basic building blocks for scaling to larger multi-kilojoule systems for inertial fusion energy (IFE) applications. Mercury has requirements that include: scalability to IFE beamlines, 10 Hz repetition rate, high efficiency, and 10{sup 9} shot reliability. The Mercury laser has operated continuously for several hours at 55 J and 10 Hz with fourteen 4 x 6 cm{sup 2} ytterbium doped strontium fluoroapatite (Yb:S-FAP) amplifier slabs pumped by eight 100 kW diode arrays. The 1047 nm fundamental wavelength was converted to 523 nm at 160 W average power with 73% conversion efficiency using yttrium calcium oxy-borate (YCOB).
Date: November 3, 2006
Creator: Bayramian, A; Armstrong, P; Ault, E; Beach, R; Bibeau, C; Caird, J et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

FY96-98 Summary Report Mercury: Next Generation Laser for High Energy Density Physics SI-014

Description: The scope of the Mercury Laser project encompasses the research, development, and engineering required to build a new generation of diode-pumped solid-state lasers for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). The Mercury Laser will be the first integrated demonstration of laser diodes, crystals, and gas cooling within a scalable laser architecture. This report is intended to summarize the progress accomplished during the first three years of the project. Due to the technological challenges associated with production of 900 nm diode-bars, heatsinks, and high optical-quality Yb:S-FAP crystals, the initial focus of the project was primarily centered on the R&D in these three areas. During the third year of the project, the R&D continued in parallel with the development of computer codes, partial activation of the laser, component testing, and code validation where appropriate.
Date: May 23, 2000
Creator: Bayramian, A; Beach, R; Bibeau, C; Chanteloup, J; Ebbers, C; Emanuel, M et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

FY2002 Progress Summary Program Plan, Statement of Work and Deliverables for Development of High Average Power Diode-Pumped Solid State Lasers, and Complementary Technologies, for Applications in Energy and Defense

Description: The High Average Power Laser Program (HAPL) is a multi-institutional, coordinated effort to develop a high-energy, repetitively pulsed laser system for Inertial Fusion Energy and other DOE and DOD applications. This program is building a laser-fusion energy base to complement the laser-fusion science developed by DOE Defense programs over the past 25 years. The primary institutions responsible for overseeing and coordinating the research activities are the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) and LLNL. The current LLNL proposal is a companion proposal to that submitted by NRL, for which the driver development element is focused on the krypton fluoride excimer laser option. Aside from the driver development aspect, the NRL and LLNL companion proposals pursue complementary activities with the associated rep-rated laser technologies relating to target fabrication, target injection, final optics, fusion chamber, materials and power plant economics. This report requests continued funding in FY02 to support LLNL in its program to build a 1kW, 100J, diode-pumped, crystalline laser. In addition, research in high gain laser target design, fusion chamber issues and survivability of the final optic element will be pursued. These technologies are crucial to the feasibility of inertial fusion energy power plants and also have relevance in rep-rated stewardship experiments.
Date: December 13, 2001
Creator: Bayramian, A; Bibeau, C; Beach, R; Behrendt, B; Ebbers, C; Latkowski, J et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Diode-pumped solid-state lasers: next generation drivers for inertial fusion energy and high energy density plasma physics

Description: We are in the process of developing and building a laser system as the first in a series of a new generation of diode-pumped solid-state Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) lasers at LLNL (see Fig. 1 below). This laser system named �Mercury� will be the first integrated demonstration of a scalable laser architecture compatible with advanced high energy density (HED) physics applications. Primary performance goals include 10% efficiencies at 10 Hz and a 1- 10 ns pulse with lo energies of 100 J and with 2(omega)J/3(omega) frequency conversion.
Date: August 3, 1998
Creator: Beach, R. J.; Bibeau, C.; Ebbers, C. A.; Emanuel, M. A.; Honea, E. C.; Krupke, W. F. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Mercury and Beyond: Diode-Pumped Solid-State Lasers for Inertial Fusion Energy

Description: We have begun building the ''Mercury'' laser system as the first in a series of new generation diode-pumped solid-state lasers for inertial fusion research. Mercury will integrate three key technologies: diodes, crystals, and gas cooling, within a unique laser architecture that is scalable to kilojoule and megajoule energy levels for fusion energy applications. The primary near-term performance goals include 10% electrical efficiencies at 10 Hz and 1005 with a 2-10 ns pulse length at 1.047 {micro}m wavelength. When completed, Mercury will allow rep-rated target experiments with multiple chambers for high energy density physics research.
Date: December 1, 1999
Creator: Bibeau, C.; Bayramian, A.; Beach, R.J.; Chanteloup, J.C.; Ebbers, C.A.; Emanuel, M.A. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Performance of a diode-end-pumped Yb:YAG laser

Description: Using an end-pumped technology developed at LLNL we have demonstrated a Yb:YAG laser capable of delivering up to 434 W of CW power and 280 W of Q-switched power. In addition, we have frequency doubled the output to 515 nm using a dual crystal scheme to produce 76 W at 10 kHz in a 30 ns pulse length.
Date: May 5, 1997
Creator: Bibeau, C.; Beach, R.; Ebbers, C. & Emanuel, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

CW and Q-switched performance of a diode end-pumped Yb:YAG laser. Revision 1

Description: Using an end-pumped technology developed at LLNL we have demonstrated a Yb:YAG laser capable of delivering up to 434 W of CW power and 226 W of Q-switched power. In addition, we have frequency doubled the output to 515 nm using a dual crystal scheme to produce 76 W at 10 kHz in a 30 ns pulse length.
Date: February 19, 1997
Creator: Bibeau, C.; Beach, R.; Ebbers, C.; Emanuel, M. & Skidmore, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Mercury and Beyond: Diode-Pumped Solid-State Lasers for Inertial Fusion Energy

Description: We have begun building the ''Mercury'' laser system as the first in a series of new generation diode-pumped solid-state lasers for inertial fusion research. Mercury will integrate three key technologies: diodes, crystals, and gas cooling, within a unique laser architecture that is scalable to kilojoule energy levels for fusion energy applications. The primary performance goals include 10% electrical efficiencies at 10 Hz and 100 J with a 2-10 ns pulse length at 1.047 pm wavelength. When completed, Mercury will allow rep-rated target experiments with multiple target chambers for high energy density physics research.
Date: October 19, 1999
Creator: Bibeau, C.; Beach, R.J.; Bayramian, A.; Chanteloup, J.C.; Ebbers, C.A.; Emanuel, M.A. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Mercury Laser System: An Average power, gas-cooled, Yb:S-FAP based system with frequency conversion and wavefront correction

Description: We report on the operation of the Mercury laser with fourteen 4 x 6 cm{sup 2} Yb:S-FAP amplifier slabs pumped by eight 100 kW peak power diode arrays. The system was continuously run at 55 J and 10 Hz for several hours, (2 x 10{sup 5} cumulative shots) with over 80% of the energy in a 6 times diffraction limited spot at 1.047 um. Improved optical quality was achieved in Yb:S-FAP amplifiers with magneto-rheological finishing, a deterministic polishing method. In addition, average power frequency conversion employing YCOB was demonstrated at 50% conversion efficiency or 22.6 J at 10 Hz.
Date: August 31, 2005
Creator: Bibeau, C; Bayramian, A; Armstrong, P; Ault, E; Beach, R; Benapfl, M et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Janus Intense Short Pulse (ISP), the Next Ultrahigh Intensity Laser at LLNL

Description: The Janus ISP upgrade is being developed at LLNL to provide a high-energy (hundreds of Joules) short duration (0.5 to 200 ps) laser pulse with variable delay from a second high-energy (up to 1kJ) long duration (0.2 to 20 ns) laser pulse on target. A new target chamber will allow the angle between the long and short pulse beams to be varied from about 35 to near 180 degrees. Commissioning of the system will begin in the summer of 2005.
Date: September 28, 2004
Creator: Caird, J A; Bonlie, J D; Britten, J A; Cross, R R; Ebbers, C A; Eckart, M J et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department