4,131 Matching Results

Search Results

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit No. 423: Building 03-60 Underground Discharge Point, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada

Description: This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV), the State of Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP), and the US Department of Defense. The CAIP is a document that provides or references all of the specific information for investigation activities associated with Corrective Action Units (CAUS) or Corrective Action Sites (CASs) (FFACO, 1996). As per the FFACO (1996), CASs are sites potentially requiring corrective action(s) and may include solid waste management units or individual disposal or release sites. Corrective Action Units consist of one or more CASs grouped together based on geography, technical similarity, or agency responsibility for the purpose of determining corrective actions. This CAIP contains the environmental sample collection objectives and the criteria for conducting site investigation activities at CAU No. 423, the Building 03-60 Underground Discharge Point (UDP), which is located in Area 3 at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR). The TTR, part of the Nellis Air Force Range, is approximately 225 kilometers (km) (140 miles [mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figures 1-1 and 1-2). Corrective Action Unit No. 423 is comprised of only one CAS (No. 03-02-002-0308), which includes the Building 03-60 UDP and an associated discharge line extending from Building 03-60 to a point approximately 73 meters (m) (240 feet [ft]) northwest as shown on Figure 1-3.
Date: October 1, 1997
Creator: /NV, DOE
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

COATINGS FOR PROTECTION OF EQUIPMENT FOR BIOCHEMICAL PROCESSING OF GEOTHERMAL RESIDUES: PROGRESS REPORT FY 97

Description: Thermal sprayed ethylene methacrylic acid (EMAA) and ethylene tetrafluoroethylene (ETFE), spray-and-bake ETFE and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) and brushable ceramic-epoxy coatings were evaluated for corrosion protection in a biochemical process to treat geothermal residues. The findings are also relevant to other moderate temperature brine environments where corrosion is a problem. Coupon, Atlas cell, peel strength, cathodic disbondment and abrasion tests were performed in aggressive environments including geothermal sludge, hypersaline brine and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (Thiobadus ferrooxidans) to determine suitability for protecting storage tanks and reaction vessels. It was found that all of the coatings were resistant to chemical attack and biodegradation at the test temperature of 55 C. The EMAA coatings protected 316L stainless steel from corrosion in coupon tests. However, corrosion of mild steel substrates thermal sprayed with EMAA and ETFE occurred in Atlas cell tests that simulated a lined reactor operating environment and this resulted in decreased adhesive strength. Peel tests to measure residual adhesion revealed that failure mode was dependent on exposure conditions. Long-term tests on the durability of ceramic-epoxy coatings in brine and bacteria are ongoing. Initial indications are that this coating has suitable characteristics. Abrasion tests showed that the ceramic-epoxy had good resistance to the abrasive effects of sludge. Thermal sprayed EMAA coatings also displayed abrasion resistance. Cathodic disbondment tests in brine at room temperature indicated that EMAA coatings are resistant to disbondment at applied potentials of {minus}780 to {minus}1,070 mV SCE for the test conditions and duration. Slight disbondment of one specimen occurred at a potential of {minus}1,500 mV SCE. The EMAA may be suited to use in conjunction with cathodic protection although further long-term, higher temperature testing would be needed.
Date: November 1, 1997
Creator: ALLAN,M.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Higgs-photon associated production at hadron colliders

Description: The authors present cross sections for the reactions p{anti p} {yields} H{gamma} and pp {yields} H{gamma} arising from the subprocess q{anti q} {yields} H{gamma}. The calculation includes the complete one-loop contribution from all light quarks and is the main source of Higgs-photon associated production in hadron colliders. At Tevatron energies, the cross section is typically 0.1 fb or less, while at LHC energies it can exceed 1.0fb.
Date: November 1, 1997
Creator: Abbasabadi, A.; Bowser-Chao, D.; Dicus, D.A. & Repko, W.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development of regenerable copper-based sorbents for hot gas cleanup: Final technical report, September 1, 1995--August 31, 1996

Description: The overall objective of this study was to determine the effectiveness of the copper-chromite sorbent (developed in previous ICCI-funded projects) for longer duration application under optimum conditions in the temperature range of 550{degrees}-650{degrees}C to minimize sorbent reduction and degradation during the cyclic process. Three (3) formulations of attrition resistant granules of the copper chromite sorbent (i.e., CuCr-10, CuCr-21, and CuCr-29) as well as one (1) copper chromite sorbent in pellet form (i.e., CuCr-36) were selected for cyclic desulfurization tests. The desulfurization and regeneration capabilities of the selected formulations as well as the effects of operating parameters were determined, to identify the {open_quotes}best{close_quotes} sorbent formulation and the optimum operating conditions. The durability of the {open_quotes}best{close_quotes} sorbent formulation was determined in {open_quotes}long-term{close_quotes} multicycle tests conducted at the optimum operating conditions. The attrition resistance of the selected formulations were determined and compared with those of other sorbents, including a limestone, a dolomite, and a commercial zinc titanate sorbent. The results obtained in this study indicate that, the CuCr-29 sorbent has excellent attrition resistance and desulfurization performance, which are far superior to the commercial zinc titanate sorbents. The optimum desulfurization temperature in terms of sorbent efficiency and utilization appears to be about 600{degrees}C. Sorbent regeneration at 750{degrees}C ensured complete conversion of the copper sulfide to oxide without sulfate formation or reactivity deterioration in subsequent cycles.
Date: May 1, 1997
Creator: Abbasian, J.; Slimane, R.B. & Wangerow, J.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Design considerations for the development of a space qualification Short Wavelength Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (SWIFTS)

Description: This document is the final report on work performed at Sandia National Laboratories during FY 1992 and 1993 for a Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program to look at problems associated with the design and long term operation of a short wavelength imaging Fourier Transform (FT) spectrometer for use in space. In attempts to answer two fundamental questions: is a FT spectrometer with a resolution of 1 cm{sup {minus}1} covering the silicon detector wavelength range of 0.4 to 1.1 microns feasible in a long life space instrument and, if so, is it the best method of obtaining the desired information? Emphasis has been on identifying methods which minimize reliance on precision mechanical alignment and precise velocity control. An important consideration has also been to develop methods which will be compatible with a variety of self-scanning solid state imaging devices. A breadboard instrument was constructed using cube corner retroreflectors and a laser diode position reference. Some preliminary results are reported. This work is primarily intended to act as an aid to engineers at Sandia who wish to pursue the fabrication of a flight qualified instrument. The theoretical parts are intended to be somewhat tutorial in nature to aid the engineer who is not familiar with FT spectroscopy.
Date: June 1, 1997
Creator: Abbink, R. E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Preliminary measurement of prompt D{sup {+-}} and D*{sup {+-}} meson production and D*{sup {+-}} spin alignment in hadronic Z{sup 0} decays

Description: The authors have measured the production rates as a function of scaled energy x of prompt charmed pseudoscalar D{sup {+-}} and vector D*{sup {+-}} mesons in hadronic Z{sup 0} decays. The prompt signal components were isolated from the background of D mesons from B hadron decays using impact parameters of reconstructed D{sup {+-}} {yields} K{sup {minus_plus}}{pi}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {+-}} and D*-daughter D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup {minus}}{pi}{sup +} and D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup {minus}}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}}{pi}{sup +} candidates. Using the combined meson production rates the authors have measured the fraction of hadronic Z{sup 0} decays into c{bar c}, R{sub c} = 0.182 {+-} 0.027 (stat.) {+-} 0.012 (syst.) (Preliminary). Comparison of the D*{sup {+-}} and D{sup {+-}} rates gives a direct probe of vector (V) vs. pseudoscalar (P) meson production for charmed quarks, and for x > 0.4 they have measured P{sub V} = V/(V + P) = 0.65 {+-} 0.09(stat.) {+-} 0.03(syst.) {+-} 0.03 (BR) (Preliminary). They have measured the degree of spin alignment of the D*{sup {+-}} mesons along their flight direction and find it to be consistent with zero. They compared the latter two results with QCD- and model-based predictions of charm-quark jet fragmentation.
Date: June 1, 1997
Creator: Abe, K.; Abe, K.; Akagi, T. & Collaboration, SLD
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Laves intermetallics in stainless steel-zirconium alloys

Description: Laves intermetallics have a significant effect on properties of metal waste forms being developed at Argonne National Laboratory. These waste forms are stainless steel-zirconium alloys that will contain radioactive metal isotopes isolated from spent nuclear fuel by electrometallurgical treatment. The baseline waste form composition for stainless steel-clad fuels is stainless steel-15 wt.% zirconium (SS-15Zr). This article presents results of neutron diffraction measurements, heat-treatment studies and mechanical testing on SS-15Zr alloys. The Laves intermetallics in these alloys, labeled Zr(Fe,Cr,Ni){sub 2+x}, have both C36 and C15 crystal structures. A fraction of these intermetallics transform into (Fe,Cr,Ni){sub 23}Zr{sub 6} during high-temperature annealing; the authors have proposed a mechanism for this transformation. The SS-15Zr alloys show virtually no elongation in uniaxial tension, but exhibit good strength and ductility in compression tests. This article also presents neutron diffraction and microstructural data for a stainless steel-42 wt.% zirconium (SS-42Zr) alloy.
Date: May 1, 1997
Creator: Abraham, D.P.; McDeavitt, S.M. & Richardson, J.W. Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The migration and entrapment of DNAPLs in physically and chemically heterogeneous porous media. Annual progress report, September 15, 1996--August 25, 1997

Description: 'The overall objective of this research is to investigate the influence of coupled physical and chemical heterogeneity on the migration and entrapment of DNAPLs in the saturated zone. This research includes laboratory and numerical investigations for a matrix of fluid and solid properties encompassing a range of wettability characteristics. Specific objectives include: (1) quantification of medium wettability and interfacial tensions; (2) determination of hydraulic property relations; (3) two-dimensional infiltration experiments; (4) modification of a continuum based multiphase flow simulator to account for physical heterogeneity, saturation independent and saturation dependent wettability, and concentration dependent wettability and interfacial tension; and (5) utilization of this model to explore the potential influence of coupled physical and chemical heterogeneities on the migration of DNAPLs and the development of innovative remediation schemes. Research conducted during this period was directed primarily towards the accomplishment of goals (1), (2), (4) and (5); specific details are given below. Goal (3) builds upon results from the other objectives and will, therefore, be started in the coming year.'
Date: January 1, 1997
Creator: Abriola, L.M. & Demond, A.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Changes in Gas Bubble Disease Signs and Survival of Migrating Juvenile Salmonids Experimentally Exposed to Supersaturated Gasses, 1995-1996 Progress Report.

Description: Research conducted in 1996 to evaluate (1) changes in GBD signs in juvenile salmonids resulting from passage through turbine intakes and bypass systems, and (2) relative survival during migration through the lower Snake River for juvenile salmonids experimentally exposed to supersaturation of dissolved gas.
Date: November 1, 1997
Creator: Absolon, Randall F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Project health and safety plan for the Gunite and Associated Tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

Description: The Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) policy is to provide a safe and healthful workplace for all employees and subcontractors. The accomplishment of this policy requires that operations at the Gunite and Associated Tanks (GAAT) in the North and South Tank Farms (NTF and STF) at the Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory are guided by an overall plan and consistent proactive approach to health and safety (H and S) issues. The policy and procedures in this plan apply to all GAAT operations in the NTF and STF. The provisions of this plan are to be carried out whenever activities identifies s part of the GAAT are initiated that could be a threat to human health or the environment. This plan implements a policy and establishes criteria for the development of procedures for day-to-day operations to prevent or minimize any adverse impact to the environment and personnel safety and health and to meet standards that define acceptable management of hazardous and radioactive materials and wastes. The plan is written to utilize past experience and best management practices in order to minimize hazards to human health or the environment from events such as fires, explosions, falls, mechanical hazards, or any unplanned release of hazardous or radioactive materials to the air. This plan explains additional task-specific health and safety requirements such as the Site Safety and health Addendum and Activity Hazard Analysis, which should be used in concert with this plan and existing established procedures.
Date: April 1, 1997
Creator: Abston, J. P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Beam Steering and Routing in Quadratic Nonlinear Media

Description: We show how the spatial phase modulation of weak second-harmonic signals controls the overall direction of propagation of spatial solitons in quadratic nonlinear media. We investigate numerically such a process and discuss its applications to all-optical beam routing. 5 refs., 3 figs.
Date: April 1, 1997
Creator: Aceves, A. B.; Santos, M. C. & Torner, L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Assessment of California reformulated gasoline impact on vehicle fuel economy

Description: Fuel economy data contained in the 1996 California Air Resources Board (CARB) report with respect to the introduction of California Reformulated Gasoline (CaRFG) has been examined and reanalyzed by two additional statistical methodologies. Additional data has also been analyzed by these two statistical approaches. Within the assumptions of the analysis, point estimates for the reduction in fuel economy using CaRFG as compared to conventional, non-reformulated gasoline were 2-4%, with a 95% upper confidence bound of 6%. Substantial variations in fuel economy are routine and inevitable due to additional factors which affect mileage, even if there is no change in fuel reformulation. This additional analysis confirms the conclusion reached by CARB with respect to the impact of CaRFG on fuel economy.
Date: January 1, 1997
Creator: Aceves, S., LLNL
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Assessment of California reformulated gasoline impact on vehicle fuel economy

Description: Fuel economy data contained in the 1996 California Air Resources Board (CAROB) report with respect to the introduction of California Reformulated Gasoline (CaRFG) has been examined and reanalyzed by two additional statistical methodologies. Additional data has also been analyzed by these two statistical approaches. Within the assumptions of the analysis, point estimates for the reduction in fuel economy using CaRFG as compared to conventional, non-reformulated gasoline were 2-4 %, with a 95% upper confidence bound of 6 %. Substantial variations in fuel economy are routine and inevitable due to additional factors which affect mileage, even if there is no change in fuel reformulation. This additional analysis confirms the conclusion reached by CAROB with respect to the impact of CaRFG on fuel economy.
Date: January 1, 1997
Creator: Aceves, S.; Glaser, R. & Richardson, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Investigation into environmentally friendly alternative cleaning processes for hybrid microcircuits to replace vapor degreasing with 1,1,1-trichloroethane. Final report

Description: Two cleaning processes, one aqueous and one nonaqueous, were investigated as potential replacements for the vapor degreasing process using 1,1,1 trichloroethane (TCA) for hybrid microcircuit assemblies. The aqueous process was based upon saponification chemistry. A 10% solution of either Kester 5768 or Armakleen 2001, heated to 140 F, was sprayed on the hybrid at 450 psig and a flow rate of 5 gpm through a specially designed nozzle which created microdroplets. The nonaqueous process was based upon dissolution chemistry and used d-limonene as the solvent in an immersion and spray process. The d-limonene solvent was followed by an isopropyl alcohol spray rinse to remove the excess d-limonene. The aqueous microdroplet process was found to be successful only for solder reflow profiles that did not exceed 210 C. Furthermore, removal of component marking was a problem and the spray pressure had to be reduced to 130 psig to eliminate damage to capacitor end caps. The d-limonene cleaning was found to be successful for solder reflow temperature up to 250 C when using a four-step cleaning process. The four steps included refluxing the hybrid at 80 C, followed by soaking the hybrid in d-limonene which is heated to 80 C, followed by spray cleaning at 80 psig with room temperature d-limonene, followed by spray cleaning at 80 psig with room temperature IPA was developed to remove residual flux from the hybrid microcircuits. This process was the most robust and most closely matched the cleaning ability of TCA.
Date: February 1, 1997
Creator: Adams, B.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Properties of energetic materials: United States Department of Energy (DOE) Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI) strategic alliances

Description: The Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI) program is designed to provide the computational resources which are required to provide a simulation based approach to the Science Based Stockpile Stewardship (SBSS) program. The capability to predict the properties of energetic materials is one of the areas of interest to the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) ASCI program. This capability will support computational assessments of the safety and reliability of systems containing explosives and other energetic materials subjected to normal and abnormal environments. Several research elements related to energetic material properties are described in more detail below. They are: (A) calculation of decomposition rates, (B) molecular potential functions, (C) physical properties and transport coefficients, (D) molecular energization mechanisms, (E) fracture/failure of energetic material crystals, (F) grain-grain and grain- binder interactions, and (G) aging effects in energetic material. These elements have in common the need to develop computational methods that have a strong foundation in basic physical principles. They will generally have to be implemented to run efficiently on advanced parallel computing platforms to achieve sufficient accuracy.
Date: January 1, 1997
Creator: Adams, T.F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

MSO spent salt clean-up recovery process

Description: An effective process has been developed to separate metals, mineral residues, and radionuclides from spent salt, a secondary waste generated by Molten Salt Oxidation (MSO). This process includes salt dissolution, pH adjustment, chemical reduction and/or sulfiding, filtration, ion exchange, and drying. The process uses dithionite to reduce soluble chromate and/or sulfiding agent to suppress solubilities of metal compounds in water. This process is capable of reducing the secondary waste to less than 5% of its original weight. It is a low temperature, aqueous process and has been demonstrated in the laboratory [1].
Date: February 1, 1997
Creator: Adamson, M G; Brummond, W A; Hipple, D L; Hsu, P C; Summers, L J; Von Holtz, E H et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Technical Support Section annual work plan for FY 1998

Description: The Technical Support Section (TSS) of the Instrumentation and Controls (I and C) Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) provides technical services such as fabrication, modification, installation, calibration, operation, repair, and preventive maintenance of instruments and other related equipment. Because the activities and priorities of TSS must be adapted to the technical support needs of ORNL, the TSS Annual Work Plan is derived from, and is driven directly by, current trends in the budgets and activities of each ORNL division for which TSS provides support. Trends that will affect TSS planning during this period are reductions in the staffing levels of some R and D programs because of attrition or budget cuts. TSS does not have an annual budget to cover operating expenses incurred in providing instrument maintenance support to ORNL. Each year, TSS collects information concerning the projected funding levels of programs and facilities it supports. TSS workforce and resource projections are based on the information obtained and are weighted depending on the percentage of support provided to that division or program. Each year, TSS sets the standard hourly charge rate for the following fiscal year. The Long-Range Work Plan is based on estimates of the affects of the long-range priorities and directions of the Laboratory. Proposed new facilities and programs provide additional bases for long-range planning. After identifying long-range initiatives, TSS planning includes future training requirements, reevaluation of qualifications for new hires, and identification of essential test equipment that will be needed for new work.
Date: December 1, 1997
Creator: Adkisson, B.P.; Allison, K.L.; Effler, R.P.; Hess, R.A.; Keeble, T.A.; Odom, S.M. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

303-K Storage facility sampling and analysis plan

Description: This document describes the cleanup, sampling, and analysis activities associated with the closure of the 303-K Storage Facility under the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-610, ``Dangerous Waste Regulations.`` this document is a supplement to the 303-K Storage Facility Closure Plan (DOE-RL 1995a) (Closure Plan). The objective of these activities is to support clean closure of the 303 K Storage Facility. This document defines the information and activities needed to meet this objective, including: constituents of concern, cleanup performance standards, cleanup activities, sampling locations and methods, field screening locations and methods, field quality control requirements, laboratory analytical methods, and data validation methodology. This document supersedes the Closure Plan if the two conflict
Date: July 1, 1997
Creator: Adler, J.G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Nonlinear viscoelastic response of carbon black-filled butyl rubber and implications for o-ring aging

Description: Butyl rubber, unfortunately, has pronounced nonlinear viscoelastic behavior, which may be modelled by a separable KBKZ formalism. While these effects seem to have minimal impact on accelerated sealing force measurements, they do severely impact compression set tests. Therefore, a new test is suggested for evaluating field-return o-rings which is free from such confounding effects.
Date: November 1, 1997
Creator: Adolf, D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Viscosities of epoxy encapsulants

Description: The temperature, curing, and filler dependencies of the viscosities of common epoxies used at Sandia encapsulants are presented along with examples of useful applications.
Date: November 1, 1997
Creator: Adolf, D.; Strommen, R. & Johnson, H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Corrosion of AB{sub 5} metal hydride electrodes

Description: Metal hydride electrodes are an attractive substitute for the cadmium electrode in Cd/Ni batteries because of their relatively benign environmental impact and higher energy density. However, even though MH{sub x}/Ni batteries are currently competitive in certain applications, their full potential as cheap, reliable, energy storage devices is not yet realized: a severe penalty has been incurred in storage capacity and materials costs in order to inhibit corrosion and attain acceptable electrode cycle life. Currently there are two types of alloys which are useful as metal hydride electrodes, the AB{sub 5} and the AB{sub 2} classes of intermetallic compounds. Commercial AB{sub 5} electrodes use mischmetal, a low cost combination of rare earth elements. The B{sub 5} component remains primarily Ni but is substituted in part with Co, Mn, Al etc. The partial substitution of Ni increases thermodynamic stability of the hydride phase and corrosion resistance. Such an alloy is commonly written as MmB{sub 5} where Mm represents the mischmetal component; the B{sub 5} composition in commercial batteries is variable but electrodes consisting of MmNi{sub 3.55}Co{sub .75}Mn{sub .4}Al{sub .3} have good storage capacity and cycle life and most AB{sub 5} battery electrodes have a similar composition. The authors have been concerned with the function that individual components play in such an alloy with respect to lattice expansion, hydride stability, and surface passivation. Thus they have focused on the properties of a similar alloy, A(NiCoMnAl){sub 5} where A is La or La{sub 1{minus}x}Ce{sub x}. Some of their results noted here have previously appeared in separate publications; the purpose of this paper is to combine them with new data to give a more coherent and complete whole.
Date: November 1, 1997
Creator: Adzic, G.D.; Johnson, J.R.; Mukerjee, S.; McBreen, J. & Reilly, J.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Experimental methodology for computational fluid dynamics code validation

Description: Validation of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes is an essential element of the code development process. Typically, CFD code validation is accomplished through comparison of computed results to previously published experimental data that were obtained for some other purpose, unrelated to code validation. As a result, it is a near certainty that not all of the information required by the code, particularly the boundary conditions, will be available. The common approach is therefore unsatisfactory, and a different method is required. This paper describes a methodology developed specifically for experimental validation of CFD codes. The methodology requires teamwork and cooperation between code developers and experimentalists throughout the validation process, and takes advantage of certain synergisms between CFD and experiment. The methodology employs a novel uncertainty analysis technique which helps to define the experimental plan for code validation wind tunnel experiments, and to distinguish between and quantify various types of experimental error. The methodology is demonstrated with an example of surface pressure measurements over a model of varying geometrical complexity in laminar, hypersonic, near perfect gas, 3-dimensional flow.
Date: September 1, 1997
Creator: Aeschliman, D.P. & Oberkampf, W.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department