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HIGH PERFORMANCE STATIONARY DISCHARGES IN THE DIII-D TOKAMAK

Description: Recent experiments in the DIII-D tokamak [J.L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42,614 (2002)] have demonstrated high {beta} with good confinement quality under stationary conditions. Two classes of stationary discharges are observed--low q{sub 95} discharges with sawteeth and higher q{sub 95} without sawteeth. The discharges are deemed stationary when the plasma conditions are maintained for times greater than the current profile relaxation time. In both cases the normalized fusion performance ({beta}{sub N}H{sub 89P}/q{sub 95}{sup 2}) reaches or exceeds the value of this parameter projected for Q{sub fus} = 10 in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) design [R. Aymar, et al., Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 44, 519 (2002)]. The presence of sawteeth reduces the maximum achievable normalized {beta}, while confinement quality (confinement time relative to scalings) is largely independent of q{sub 95}. Even with the reduced {beta} limit, the normalized fusion performance maximizes at the lowest q{sub 95}. Projections to burning plasma conditions are discussed, including the methodology of the projection and the key physics issues which still require investigation.
Date: October 1, 2003
Creator: 45th ANNUAL MEETING OF DIVISION OF PLASMA PHYSICS, ALBUQUERQUE, NEW MEXICO, OCTOBER 27-31,2003 AND TO BE PUBLISHED IN PHYS. PLASMAS.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Physical effects of infrared quark eigenmodes in LQCD

Description: A truncated determinant algorithm is used to study the physical effects of the quark eigenmodes associated with eigenvalues below 300 MeV. This initial study focuses on coarse lattices (with O(a{sup 2}) improved gauge action), light internal quark masses and large physical volumes. Four bellweather full QCD processes are discussed: topological charge distributions, the eta prime propagator, string breaking as observed in the static energy and the rho decay into two pions.
Date: October 7, 1999
Creator: A. Duncan, E. Eichten and H. Thacker
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

CRYSTALLIZATION IN MULTICOMPONENT GLASSES

Description: In glass processing situations involving glass crystallization, various crystalline forms nucleate, grow, and dissolve, typically in a nonuniform temperature field of molten glass subjected to convection. Nuclear waste glasses are remarkable examples of multicomponent vitrified mixtures involving partial crystallization. In the glass melter, crystals form and dissolve during batch-to-glass conversion, melter processing, and product cooling. Crystals often agglomerate and sink, and they may settle at the melter bottom. Within the body of cooling glass, multiple phases crystallize in a non-uniform time-dependent temperature field. Self-organizing periodic distribution (the Liesegnang effect) is common. Various crystallization phenomena that occur in glass making are reviewed.
Date: October 8, 2009
Creator: AA, KRUGER & PR, HRMA
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

THERMAL ANALYSIS OF WASTE GLASS MELTER FEEDS

Description: Melter feeds for high-level nuclear waste (HLW) typically contain a large number of constituents that evolve gas on heating, Multiple gas-evolving reactions are both successive and simultaneous, and include the release of chemically bonded water, reactions of nitrates with organics, and reactions of molten salts with solid silica. Consequently, when a sample of a HLW feed is subjected to thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), the rate of change of the sample mass reveals multiple overlapping peaks. In this study, a melter feed, formulated for a simulated high-alumina HLW to be vitrified in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant, currently under construction at the Hanford Site in Washington State, USA, was subjected to TGA. In addition, a modified melter feed was prepared as an all-nitrate version of the baseline feed to test the effect of sucrose addition on the gas-evolving reactions. Activation energies for major reactions were determined using the Kissinger method. The ultimate aim of TGA studies is to obtain a kinetic model of the gas-evolving reactions for use in mathematical modeling of the cold cap as an element of the overall model of the waste-glass melter. In this study, we focused on computing the kinetic parameters of individual reactions without identifying their actual chemistry, The rough provisional model presented is based on the first-order kinetics.
Date: October 21, 2011
Creator: AA, KRUGER; PR, HRMA; R, POKORNY & DA, PIERCE
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Roles and Delegation of Authority (R/DA) System

Description: The processes of defining managerial roles and providing for delegation of authority are essential to any enterprise. At most large organizations, these processes are defined in policy manuals and through sets of standard operating procedures for many, if not all, business and administrative functions. Many of these staff-initiated, administrative functions require the routing of documents for approval to one or more levels of management. These employee-oriented, back office types of workflows tend to require more flexibility in determining to whom these documents should go to, while, at the same time, providing the responsible parties with the flexibility to delegate their approval authority or allow others to review their work. Although this practice is commonplace in manual, paper-based processes that exist in many organizations, it is difficult to provide the same flexibility in the more structured, electronic-based, workflow systems.
Date: October 21, 1999
Creator: ABBOTT,JOHN P.; HUTCHINS,JAMES C. & SCHOCH,DAVID G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Observations of Non-Close-Packed Arrangements in Multilayers of Passivated Gold Clusters

Description: The stacking of second and third layers of supercrystals of self-assembled passivated gold nanoparticles has been investigated using transmission electron microscopy. We report for the first time nanoparticles occupying the twofold saddle site in the third layer.
Date: October 5, 1999
Creator: AINDOW, M.; BROWN, P.; KIELY, C.J.; WELLNER, A. & WILCOXON, JESS P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Analysis of Tracer Tests with Multirate Diffusion Models: Recent Results and Future Directions within the WIPP Project

Description: A series of single-well injection-withdrawal (SWIW) and two-well convergent-flow (TWCF) tracer tests were conducted in the Culebra dolomite at the WIPP site in late 1995 and early 1996. Modeling analyses over the past year have focused on reproducing the observed mass-recovery curves and understanding the basic physical processes controlling tracer transport in SWIW and TWCF tests. To date, specific modeling efforts have focused on five SWIW tests and one TWCF pathway at each of two different locations (H-11 and H-19 hydropads). An inverse parameter-estimation procedure was implemented to model the SWIW and TWCF tests with both traditional and multirate double-porosity formulations. The traditional model assumes a single diffusion rate while the multirate model uses a first-order approximation to model a continuous distribution of diffusion coefficients. Conceptually, the multirate model represents variable matrix block sizes within the Culebra as observed in geologic investigations and also variability in diffusion rates within the matrix blocks as observed with X-ray imaging in the laboratory. Single-rate double-porosity models cannot provide an adequate match to the SWIW data. Multirate double-porosity models provide excellent fits to all five SWIW mass-recovery curves. Models of the TWCF tests show that, at one location, the tracer test can be modeled with both single-rate and multirate double-porosity models. At the other location, only the multi-rate double-porosity model is capable of explaining the test results.
Date: October 1, 1999
Creator: ALTMAN, SUSAN J.; HAGGERTY, ROY; MCKENNA, SEAN A. & MEIGS, LUCY C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Motion Planning for a Direct Metal Deposition Rapid Prototyping System

Description: A motion planning strategy was developed and implemented to generate motion control instructions from solid model data for controlling a robotically driven solid free-form fabrication process. The planning strategy was tested using a PUMA type robot arm integrated into a LENS{trademark} (Laser Engineered Net Shape) system. Previous systems relied on a series of x, y, and z stages, to provide a minimal coordinated motion control capability. This limited the complexity of geometries that could be constructed. With the coordinated motion provided by a robotic arm, the system can produce three dimensional parts by ''writing'' material onto any face of existing material. The motion planning strategy relied on solid model geometry evaluation and exploited robotic positioning flexibility to allow the construction of geometrically complex parts. The integration of the robotic manipulator into the LENS{trademark} system was tested by producing metal parts directly from CAD models.
Date: October 18, 1999
Creator: AMES,ARLO L.; HENSINGER,DAVID M. & KUHLMANN,JOEL L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Evaluation of cracking in the 241-AZ tank farm ventilation line at the Hanford Site

Description: In the period from April to October of 1988, a series of welding operations on the outside of the AZ Tank Farm ventilation line piping at the Hanford Site produced unexpected and repeated cracking of the austenitic stainless steel base metal and of a seam weld in the pipe. The ventilation line is fabricated from type 304L stainless steel pipe of 24 inch diameter and 0.25 inch wall thickness. The pipe was wrapped in polyethylene bubble wrap and buried approximately 12 feet below grade. Except for the time period between 1980 and 1987, impressed current cathodic protection has been applied to the pipe since its installation in 1974. The paper describes the history of the cracking of the pipe, the probable cracking mechanisms, and the recommended future action for repair/replacement of the pipe.
Date: October 20, 1999
Creator: ANANTATMULA, R.P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Detection of Volatile Organics Using a Surface Acoustic Wave Array System

Description: A chemical sensing system based on arrays of surface acoustic wave (SAW) delay lines has been developed for identification and quantification of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The individual SAW chemical sensors consist of interdigital transducers patterned on the surface of an ST-cut quartz substrate to launch and detect the acoustic waves and a thin film coating in the SAW propagation path to perturb the acoustic wave velocity and attenuation during analyte sorption. A diverse set of material coatings gives the sensor arrays a degree of chemical sensitivity and selectivity. Materials examined for sensor application include the alkanethiol-based self-assembled monolayer, plasma-processed films, custom-synthesized conventional polymers, dendrimeric polymers, molecular recognition materials, electroplated metal thin films, and porous metal oxides. All of these materials target a specific chemical fi.mctionality and the enhancement of accessible film surface area. Since no one coating provides absolute analyte specificity, the array responses are further analyzed using a visual-empirical region-of-influence (VERI) pattern recognition algorithm. The chemical sensing system consists of a seven-element SAW array with accompanying drive and control electronics, sensor signal acquisition electronics, environmental vapor sampling hardware, and a notebook computer. Based on data gathered for individual sensor responses, greater than 93%-accurate identification can be achieved for any single analyte from a group of 17 VOCs and water.
Date: October 14, 1999
Creator: ANDERSON, LAWRENCE F.; BARTHOLOMEW, JOHN W.; CERNOSEK, RICHARD W.; COLBURN, CHRISTOPHER W.; CROOKS, R.M.; MARTINEZ, R.F. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

DESIGN, FABRICATION, INSTALLATION AND TESTING OF IN-VESSEL CONTROL COILS FOR DIII-D

Description: OAK A271 DESIGN, FABRICATION, INSTALLATION AND TESTING OF IN-VESSEL CONTROL COILS FOR DIII-D. Since 1995, DIII-D has performed correction of magnetic field imperfections using a set of six external picture frame coils located on the vessel mid-plane. Recently, these coils have also demonstrated significant benefits when used for feedback of the resistive wall mode, an instability that limits the plasma performance at high beta. Modeling has shown that substantial performance improvements can be achieved by installing new coils inside the vessel and expanding the poloidal coverage above and below the mid-plane. Two prototype internal coils were installed in 2001 and have been tested successfully. installation of a set of twelve internal coils and magnetic sensors in the DIII-D tokamak is to be completed in December 2002. The design requirement for the new coil system was to maximize the magnetic field at the plasma edge, operate with a frequency range of dc to 1000 Hz, and fit behind the existing graphite wall tiles. The coil design adopted and installed is a water-cooled hollow copper conductor insulated with polyamide and housed inside a stainless steel tube that forms a vacuum boundary. The coil is rigidly mounted to the inside of the vacuum vessel. The primary challenge in the design of these coils was in joining of both the copper conductor and the stainless tube without overheating the polyamide insulator.
Date: October 1, 2002
Creator: ANDERSON, PM; BAXI, CB; KELLMAN, AG; REIS, EE & ROBINSON, JI
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

DESIGN, FABRICATION, INSTALLATION, TESTING AND INITIAL RESULTS OF IN-VESSEL CONTROL COILS FOR DIII-D

Description: OAK-B135 Since 1995, DIII-D has performed correction of magnetic field imperfections using a set of six external picture frame coils located on the vessel mid-plane. In 2000, these coils also demonstrated benefits when used for feedback of the resistive wall mode, an instability that limits the plasma performance at high beta. Modeling has shown that substantial performance improvements could be achieved by installing new coils inside the vessel and expanding the poloidal coverage above and below the mid-plane. Two prototype internal coils were installed in 2001 and were power tested successfully after several bakes to 350 C. A full set of twelve internal coils and related magnetic sensors are now operational in the DIII-D tokamak. The design requirements for the new coil system was to maximize the magnetic field at the plasma edge, operate with a frequency range of dc to 1000 Hz, and fit behind the existing graphite wall tiles. The coil design adopted and installed is a water-cooled hollow copper conductor insulated with polyamide and housed inside a stainless steel tube that forms a vacuum boundary. The coil is rigidly mounted to the inside of the vacuum vessel. The primary challenge in the design of these coils wa sin joining of both the copper conductor and the stainless tube without overheating the polyamide insulator. Elastic-plastic analysis was used to demonstrate acceptable thermal stresses during baking conditions. Analysis determined the optimum water cooling channel diameter. The coils were tested in high toroidal field to the limit of the power supply of 4.5 kA DC with inductance-limited current for frequencies between 300 Hz and 1000 Hz. Recent results are presented.
Date: October 1, 2003
Creator: ANDERSON,P.M; BAXI,C.B; KELLMAN,A.G & REIS,E.E
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

FGB: A Graphical and Haptic User Interface for Creating Graphical, Haptic User Interfaces

Description: The emerging field of haptics represents a fundamental change in human-computer interaction (HCI), and presents solutions to problems that are difficult or impossible to solve with a two-dimensional, mouse-based interface. To take advantage of the potential of haptics, however, innovative interaction techniques and programming environments are needed. This paper describes FGB (FLIGHT GHUI Builder), a programming tool that can be used to create an application specific graphical and haptic user interface (GHUI). FGB is itself a graphical and haptic user interface with which a programmer can intuitively create and manipulate components of a GHUI in real time in a graphical environment through the use of a haptic device. The programmer can create a GHUI without writing any programming code. After a user interface is created, FGB writes the appropriate programming code to a file, using the FLIGHT API, to recreate what the programmer created in the FGB interface. FGB saves programming time and increases productivity, because a programmer can see the end result as it is created, and FGB does much of the programming itself. Interestingly, as FGB was created, it was used to help build itself. The further FGB was in its development, the more easily and quickly it could be used to create additional functionality and improve its own design. As a finished product, FGB can be used to recreate itself in much less time than it originally required, and with much less programming. This paper describes FGB's GHUI components, the techniques used in the interface, how the output code is created, where programming additions and modifications should be placed, and how it can be compared to and integrated with existing API's such as MFC and Visual C++, OpenGL, and GHOST.
Date: October 18, 1999
Creator: ANDERSON,THOMAS G.; BRECKENRIDGE,ARTHURINE & DAVIDSON,GEORGE S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

THE FUTURE OF SPIN PHYSICS AT BNL.

Description: The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at BNL is the world's only polarized proton-proton collider. Collisions at center-of-mass energies up to 500 GeV and beam polarizations approaching 70% (longitudinal or transverse) are provided to two experiments, STAR and PHENIX, at luminosities {ge} 10{sup 32}/cm{sup 2}/sec. Transverse polarized beam has also been provided to the BRAHMS experiment. Measurements that bear on the important question of the spin content of the nucleon are beginning to appear. Over the next 10 years, as the performance of polarized proton running at RHIC is further developed, the Spin Physics program at RHIC will provide definitive measurements of the contributions to the proton's spin of the gluon, the sea quarks and the orbital motion of the partons in the proton's wave function. We plan to extend the reach of our study of the role of spin in QCD with the development of ''eRHIC'', which will provide polarized e-p collisions to a new detector.
Date: October 2, 2006
Creator: ARONSON, S. & DESHPANDE, A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

MIL-L-87177 and CLT:X-10 Lubricants Improve Electrical Connector Fretting Corrosion Behavior

Description: We have conducted a fretting research project using MIL-L-87177 and CLT: X-10 lubricants on Nano-miniature connectors. When they were fretted without lubricant, individual connectors first exceeded our 0.5 ohm failure criteria from 2,341 to 45,238 fretting cycles. With additional fretting, their contact resistance increased to more than 100,000 ohms. Unmodified MIL-L-87177 lubricant delayed the onset of first failure to between 430,000 and over 20,000,000 fretting cycles. MIL-L-87177 modified by addition of Teflon powder delayed first failure to beyond 5 million fretting cycles. Best results were obtained when Teflon was used and also when both the straight and modified lubricants were poured into and then out of the connector. CLT: X-10 lubricant delayed the onset of first failure to beyond 55 million cycles in one test where a failure was actually observed and to beyond 20 million cycles in another that was terminated without failure. CLT: X-10 recovered an unlubricated connector driven deeply into failure, with six failed pins recovering immediately and four more recovering during an additional 420 thousand fretting cycles. MIL-L-87177 was not able to recover a connector under similar conditions.
Date: October 12, 1999
Creator: AUKLAND,NEIL R. & HANLON,JAMES T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Search for Standard Model Higgs Bosons Produced in Association with W Bosons

Description: The authors report on the results of a search for standard model Higgs bosons produced in association with W bosons from p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The search uses a data sample corresponding to approximately 1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. Events consistent with the W {yields} {ell}{nu} and H {yields} b{bar b} signature are selected by triggering on a high-p{sub T} electron or muon candidate and tagging one or two of the jet candidates as having originated from b quarks. A neural network filter rejects a fraction of tagged charm and light flavor jets, increasing the b-jet purity in the sample and thereby reducing the background to Higgs boson production. They observe no excess {ell}{nu}b{bar b} production beyond the background expectation, and they set 95% confidence level upper limits on the production cross section times branching fraction {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} WH) {center_dot} Br(H {yields} b{bar b}) ranging from 3.9 to 1.3 pb, for specific Higgs boson mass hypotheses in the range 110 to 150 GeV/c{sup 2}, respectively.
Date: October 1, 2007
Creator: Aaltonen, T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department