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New York State energy-analytic information system: first-stage implementation

Description: So that energy policy by state government may be formulated within the constraints imposed by policy determined at the national level - yet reflect the diverse interests of its citizens - large quantities of data and sophisticated analytic capabilities are required. This report presents the design of an energy-information/analytic system for New York State, the data for a base year, 1976, and projections of these data. At the county level, 1976 energy-supply demand data and electric generating plant data are provided as well. Data-base management is based on System 2000. Three computerized models provide the system's basic analytic capacity. The Brookhaven Energy System Network Simulator provides an integrating framework while a price-response model and a weather sensitive energy demand model furnished a short-term energy response estimation capability. The operation of these computerized models is described. 62 references, 25 figures, 39 tables.
Date: September 1, 1979
Creator: Allentuck, J.; Carroll, O. & Fiore, L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Urban Dispersion Program: Urban Measurements Applied to Emergency Response

Description: Air motions in and around cities are highly complex, and the increasing threat of harmful releases into urban atmospheres makes advancing the state-of-science of understanding and modeling atmospheric flows and dispersion in and around cities essential. The four-year Urban Dispersion Program (UDP) funded primarily by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and the Defense Threat Reduction Agency has recently been completed. The program’s primary focus was to conduct tracer and meteorological field studies in Manhattan to improve our understanding of flow and dispersion of airborne contaminants through and around the deep street canyons of New York City, including outdoor-indoor-subway exchange mechanisms. Additionally, urban dispersion models are being validated and first-responder guidance are being refined using data collected during the two UDP field studies. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory led several government laboratories, universities and private companies in conducting the two UDP field studies. The first study was a small-scale study that investigated dispersion in the immediate vicinity of the Madison Square Garden during March 2005 (MSG05), while the second UDP study was an extensive study conducted during August 2005 in Midtown Manhattan (MID05). A brief overview of the UDP field studies will be given followed by a discussion of some limitations of current urban models in simulating dispersion in urban areas. Some first-responder guidance based on findings from recent urban field studies will also be presented.
Date: September 10, 2007
Creator: Allwine, K. Jerry; Clawson, Kirk L.; Flaherty, Julia E.; Heiser, John H.; Hosker, Rayford P.; Leach, Martin J. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Evaluation of dredged material proposed for ocean disposal from Shark River Project area

Description: The objective of the Shark River Project was to evaluate proposed dredged material to determine its suitability for unconfined ocean disposal at the Mud Dump Site. Tests and analyses were conducted on the Shark River sediments. The evaluation of proposed dredged material consisted of bulk sediment chemical and physical analysis, chemical analyses of dredging site water and elutriate, water-column and benthic acute toxicity tests, and bioaccumulation tests. Individual sediment core samples collected from the Shark River were analyzed for grain size, moisture content, and total organic carbon (TOC). One sediment composite was analyzed for bulk density, specific gravity, metals, chlorinated pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and 1,4- dichlorobenzene. Dredging site water and elutriate, prepared from suspended-particulate phase (SPP) of the Shark River sediment composite, were analyzed for metals, pesticides, and PCBs. Benthic acute toxicity tests and bioaccumulation tests were performed.
Date: September 1, 1996
Creator: Antrim, L.D.; Gardiner, W.W.; Barrows, E.S. & Borde, A.B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Evaluation of dredged material proposed for ocean disposal from Gravesend Bay Anchorage, New York

Description: The Gravesend Bay Anchorage was one of seven waterways that the US Army Corps of Engineers-New York District (USACE-NYD) requested the Battelle Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) to sample and evaluate for dredging and disposal in February 1994. Sediment samples were submitted for physical and chemical analyses to provide baseline sediment chemistry data on the Gravesend Bay Anchorage. Individual sediment core samples collected at the Gravesend Bay Anchorage were analyzed for grain size, moisture content, and total organic carbon (TOC). Two samples, one of composited sediment cores representing the southeast corner of the anchorage (COMP GR), and one sediment core representing the northeast corner of the anchorage (Station GR-1 0), were analyzed for bulk density, specific gravity, metals, chlorinated pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), and 1,4-dichlorobenzene.
Date: September 1, 1996
Creator: Barrows, E.S. & Gruendell, B.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

An aerial radiological survey of the West Valley Demonstration Project and surrounding area, West Valley, New York

Description: An aerial radiological survey of the West Valley Demonstration Project and the surrounding area was conducted from mid-August through early September 1984 by EG G Energy Measurements, Inc. for the United States Department of Energy. The radiological survey was part of the United States Department of Energy Comprehensive Integrated Remote Sensing (CIRS) program, which provides state-of-the-art remote sensing to support the needs of the various DOE facilities. The survey consisted of airborne measurements of both natural and man-made gamma radiation emanating from the terrestrial surface. These measurements allowed an estimate of the distribution of isotopic concentrations in the area surrounding the project site. Results are reported as isopleths superimposed on aerial photographs of the area. Gamma ray energy spectra are also presented for the net man-made radionuclides. 8 refs., 16 figs., 9 tabs.
Date: September 1, 1991
Creator: Berry, H.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Transport and transfer rates in the waters of the continental shelf. Annual report

Description: The goal of govern project is to understand and quantify the processes that the transport and dispersal of energy-related pollutants introduced to the waters of the continental shelf and slope. The report is divided into sections dealing with processes associated with suspended solids; processes associated with sediments sinks for radionuclides and other pollutants; and spreading of water characteristics and species in solution. (ACR)
Date: September 1, 1980
Creator: Biscaye, P.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Aquatic Disposal Field Investigations, Eatons Neck Disposal Site, Long Island Sound: Appendix A

Description: This report follows the study of the sedimentary and hydraulic processes in Long Island Sound near Green Ledge, Connecticut, and Eaton's Neck, New York with the intention of investigating was to evaluate the effects of aquatic disposal of dredged material on organisms and water quality, including the significance of physical, chemical, and biological factors that influence the rate of disposal site recolonization by benthic animals.
Date: September 1977
Creator: Bokuniewicz, Henry J.; Dowling, Michael; Gebert, Jeffrey A.; Gordon, Robert; Kaminsky, Peter; Pilbeam, Carol et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Aquatic Disposal Field Investigations, Eatons Neck Disposal Site, Long Island Sound: Appendix A

Description: Appendix containing navigation calculations and the the design specifications for buoys to be used in experimental observations at Eatons Neck. It accompanies a report on the investigation of the hydraulic regime and the physical characteristics of bottom sedimentation as part of a study to investigate the effects of disposal sites on organisms and the quality of surrounding water.
Date: September 1977
Creator: Bokuniewicz, Henry J.; Dowling, Michael; Gebert, Jeffrey A.; Gordon, Robert; Kaminsky, Peter; Pilbeam, Carol et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Aquatic Disposal Field Investigations, Eatons Neck Disposal Site, Long Island Sound: Appendix B

Description: Appendix containing black and white reflection-profile photos. It accompanies a report on the investigation of the hydraulic regime and the physical characteristics of bottom sedimentation as part of a study to investigate the effects of disposal sites on organisms and the quality of surrounding water.
Date: September 1977
Creator: Bokuniewicz, Henry J.; Dowling, Michael; Gebert, Jeffrey A.; Gordon, Robert; Kaminsky, Peter; Pilbeam, Carol et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Aquatic Disposal Field Investigations, Eatons Neck Disposal Site, Long Island Sound: Appendix C

Description: Appendix containing test results of core and grab sample data from Eatons Neck. It accompanies a report on the investigation of the hydraulic regime and the physical characteristics of bottom sedimentation as part of a study to investigate the effects of disposal sites on organisms and the quality of surrounding water.
Date: September 1977
Creator: Bokuniewicz, Henry J.; Dowling, Michael; Gebert, Jeffrey A.; Gordon, Robert; Kaminsky, Peter; Pilbeam, Carol et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Aquatic Disposal Field Investigations, Eatons Neck Disposal Site, Long Island Sound: Appendix D

Description: Appendix containing profile camera photos to accompany a report on the investigation of the hydraulic regime and the physical characteristics of bottom sedimentation as part of a study to investigate the effects of disposal sites on organisms and the quality of surrounding water.
Date: September 1977
Creator: Bokuniewicz, Henry J.; Dowling, Michael; Gebert, Jeffrey A.; Gordon, Robert; Kaminsky, Peter; Pilbeam, Carol et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Aquatic Disposal Field Investigations, Eatons Neck Disposal Site, Long Island Sound: Appendix E

Description: Appendix containing black and white photos of flora and fauna at the bottom of Eatons Neck site to accompany a report on the investigation of the hydraulic regime and the physical characteristics of bottom sedimentation as part of a study to investigate the effects of disposal sites on organisms and the quality of surrounding water.
Date: September 1977
Creator: Bokuniewicz, Henry J.; Dowling, Michael; Gebert, Jeffrey A.; Gordon, Robert; Kaminsky, Peter; Pilbeam, Carol et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fort Drum integrated resource assessment. Volume 1, Executive summary

Description: Some of the most difficult problems that a federal site has in reducing its energy consumption in a cost-effective manner revolve around understanding where the energy is being used, and what technologies could be employed to decrease the energy use. Many large federal sites have one or two meters to track electric energy use for several thousand buildings and numerous industrial processes. Even where meters are available on individual buildings or family housing units, the meters are not consistently read. When the federal energy manager has been able to identify high energy users, he or she may not have the background, training, or resources to determine the most cost-effective options for reducing this energy use. This can lead to selection of suboptimal projects that prevent the site from achieving the full life-cycle cost savings. The US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), supported by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), has developed a model program that provides a systematic approach to evaluating energy opportunities that (1) identifies the building groups and end uses that use the most energy (not just have the greatest energy-use intensity), and (2) evaluates the numerous options for retrofit or installation of new technology that will result in the selection of the most cost-effective technologies. In essence, this model program provides the federal energy manager with a roadmap to significantly reduce energy use in a planned, rational, cost-effective fashion that is not biased by the constraints of the typical funding sources available to federal sites. The results from this assessment process can easily be turned into a five- to ten-year energy management plan that identifies where to start and how to proceed in order to reach the mandated energy consumption targets.
Date: September 1, 1993
Creator: Dixon, D. R.; Armstrong, P. R. & Daellenbach, K. K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Albany Quadrangle, Massachusetts, New York, Connecticut, Vermont, and New Hampshire

Description: The Albany 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ Quadrangle, Massachusetts, New York, Connecticut, Vermont, and New Hampshire, was evaluated to a depth of 1500 m for uranium favorability using National Uranium Resource Evaluation criteria. Areas of favorable geology and aeroradioactivity anomalies were examined and sampled. Most Triassic and Jurassic sediments in the Connecticut Basin, in the central part of the quadrangle, were found to be favorable for sandstone uranium deposits. Some Precambrian units in the southern Green Mountains of Vermont were found favorable for uranium deposits in veins in metamorphic rocks.
Date: September 1, 1982
Creator: Field, M T & Truesdell, D B
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fresh Kills leachate treatment and minimization study. Volume 1, Characteristics and treatment alternatives: Final report

Description: The New York City Department of Sanitation is developing a comprehensive landfill leachate management plan for the Fresh Kills Landfill. The leachate was first analyzed for conventional and priority pollutants. The leachate was well buffered at pH 7 to 8 with an alkalinity of 5,000 to 6,000 mg/L. The BOD was low, usually less than 100 mg/L, but the COD was as high as 1,800 mg/L. Ammonia concentrations were around 700 mg/L and the color resembled strong tea at 3,000 colorimetric units. Only few of the priority pollutants were present, and at extremely low concentrations. Based on the chemical characteristics of the leachate, the primary environmental impact would be on the oxygen balance of the receiving surface waters.
Date: September 1, 1993
Creator: Fillos, J. & Khanbilvardi, R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fresh Kills leachate treatment and minimization study: Volume 2, Modeling, monitoring and evaluation. Final report

Description: The New York City Department of Sanitation is developing a comprehensive landfill leachate management plan for the Fresh Kills landfill, located on the western shore of Staten Island, New York. The 3000-acre facility, owned and operated by the City of New York, has been developed into four distinct mounds that correspond to areas designated as Sections 1/9, 2/8, 3/4 and 6/7. In developing a comprehensive leachate management plan, the estimating leachate flow rates is important in designing appropriate treatment alternatives to reduce the offsite migration that pollutes both surface water and groundwater resources.Estimating the leachate flow rates from Sections 1/9 and 6/7 was given priority using an available model, hydrologic evaluation of landfill performance (HELP), and a new model, flow investigation for landfill leachate (FILL). The field-scale analysis for leachate flow included data collection of the leachate mound-level from piezometers and monitoring wells installed on-site, for six months period. From the leachate mound-head contours and flow-gradients, Leachate flow rates were computed using Darcy`s Law.
Date: September 1, 1993
Creator: Fillos, J. & Khanbilvardi, R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Evaluation study of building-resolved urban dispersion models

Description: For effective emergency response and recovery planning, it is critically important that building-resolved urban dispersion models be evaluated using field data. Several full-physics computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models and semi-empirical building-resolved (SEB) models are being advanced and applied to simulating flow and dispersion in urban areas. To obtain an estimate of the current state-of-readiness of these classes of models, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) funded a study to compare five CFD models and one SEB model with tracer data from the extensive Midtown Manhattan field study (MID05) conducted during August 2005 as part of the DHS Urban Dispersion Program (UDP; Allwine and Flaherty 2007). Six days of tracer and meteorological experiments were conducted over an approximately 2-km-by-2-km area in Midtown Manhattan just south of Central Park in New York City. A subset of these data was used for model evaluations. The study was conducted such that an evaluation team, independent of the six modeling teams, provided all the input data (e.g., building data, meteorological data and tracer release rates) and run conditions for each of four experimental periods simulated. Tracer concentration data for two of the four experimental periods were provided to the modeling teams for their own evaluation of their respective models to ensure proper setup and operation. Tracer data were not provided for the second two experimental periods to provide for an independent evaluation of the models. The tracer concentrations resulting from the model simulations were provided to the evaluation team in a standard format for consistency in inter-comparing model results. An overview of the model evaluation approach will be given followed by a discussion on the qualitative comparison of the respective models with the field data. Future model developments efforts needed to address modeling gaps identified from this study will also be discussed.
Date: September 10, 2007
Creator: Flaherty, Julia E.; Allwine, K Jerry; Brown, Mike J.; Coirier, WIlliam J.; Ericson, Shawn C.; Hansen, Olav R. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Results of the radiological and beryllium verification survey at the Sacandaga Site, Glenville, New York (SY002V)

Description: At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted an independent verification radiological and non-radioactive beryllium survey at the Sacandaga Site, located on Sacandaga Road, Glenville, New York following limited remediation of the site by Allwash of Syracuse, Inc. At the time of this survey, only building P was still standing. A small concrete structure at the east of the property had been demolished and the debris hauled away, leaving only a pit. The purpose of the survey, conducted between April and August 1993, was to confirm the success of the remedial actions performed to remove any beryllium concentrations or radioactive materials in excess of the identified guidelines. The verification survey included surface gamma scans and gamma readings at 1 meter indoors and outdoors, alpha and beta scans inside building P, and the collection of soil, dust and debris samples and smears for radionuclide and beryllium analyses. Results of the survey demonstrated that all radiological and beryllium measurements on the property were within applicable DOE guidelines. Based on all data collected. the Sacandaga Site, Glenville, New York, conforms to all applicable radiological and non-radioactive beryllium guidelines established for this site by DOE and approved by the State of New York.
Date: September 1, 1994
Creator: Foley, R. D.; Cottrell, W. D. & Johnson, C. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Status of the Residential Conservation Service Program in selected states as of December 1981

Description: The primary objective of the study reported was to collect information concerning Residential Conservation Service (RCS) and similar residential audit programs to determine the implementation status of the RCS programs in various parts of the country as of December 1, 1981. Common experiences, problems, and treatment of RCS and other residential audit programs are briefly overviewed, and then the interview findings are discussed on a state-by-state basis for each of the eleven states contacted. The program structure and status are described for each state, including the nonregulated utility programs, unique features, and problems and impacts. The 11 states are: California, Connecticut, Delaware, Iowa, Michigan, New Jersey, New York, Oregon, Rhode Island, South Carolina, and Texas. Appended are an interview guide and a table of program coverage. (LEW)
Date: September 1, 1982
Creator: Frogge, L. M.; Ehrenshaft, A. R. & Morris, L. E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Case Studies on the Effectiveness of State Financial Incentives for Renewable Energy

Description: The North Carolina Solar Center at NC State University, in collaboration with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, examined 10 state financial-incentive programs in six states using a case-study approach in order to clarify the key factors-both internal and external to the program-that influence their effectiveness at stimulating deployment of renewable energy technologies. While existing information resources such as the National Database of State Incentives for Renewable Energy (DSIRE, www.dsireusa.org) have documented what incentive programs are available, the effectiveness of such programs is not well understood. Understanding the impact of current financial incentives on the deployment of renewables and the factors that influence their effectiveness is critical to a variety of stakeholders, particularly in states considering new incentives or interested in improving or discarding existing ones.
Date: September 1, 2002
Creator: Gouchoe, S.; Everette, V. & Haynes, R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Evaluation of the conservation potential of a refit energy management system (using a power line subcarrier) in a large, high-rise apartment complex. Phase II

Description: An energy conservation study of the application of an energy management system (EMS) utilizing power line subcarrier communication equipment was made in a large apartment building in New York, New York. The building utilized individual cooling and resistance heating units in each apartment. The EMS turned the individual units on and off (with override by tenants) on a schedule determined by the building operator. Summer savings were found to be 11%; winter savings were 20%. Annual savings were projected to be 19%. The study demonstrated the conservation value of power line subcarrier technology as an alternative to submetering. It also developed and evaluated control strategies for the system and served as a field test to accelerate commercialization of the technology.
Date: September 1, 1981
Creator: Hirschfeld, H. E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Investigations of low-temperature geothermal potential in New York State

Description: Temperature gradient map and published heat flow data indicate a possible potential for a geothermal resource in western and central New York State. A new analysis of bottom-hole temperature data for New York State confirms the existence of three positive gradient anomalies: the East Aurora, Cayuga, and Elmira anomalies, with gradients as high as 32/sup 0/C/km, 36/sup 0/C/km, and 36/sup 0/C/km, respectively. Ground waters from two of these anomalies are enriched in silica relative to surrounding areas. Heat flows based on silica geothermometry are 50 to 70 mWm/sup -2/ for the anomalies and 41.4 mWm/sup -2/ for bordering regional flux. A correlation between Bouguer gravity anomalies and the temperature gradient map suggests that the geothermal anomalies may occur above radioactive granites in the basement.
Date: September 1, 1981
Creator: Hodge, D.S.; De Rito, R.; Hifiker, K.; Morgan, P. & Swanberg, C.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department