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Coal-fueled diesel technology development. Final report, March 3, 1988--January 31, 1994

Description: Since 1979, the US Department of Energy has been sponsoring Research and Development programs to use coal as a fuel for diesel engines. In 1984, under the partial sponsorship of the Burlington Northern and Norfolk Southern Railroads, GE completed a 30-month study on the economic viability of a coal-fueled locomotive. In response to a GE proposal to continue researching the economic and technical feasibility of a coal-fueled diesel engine for locomotives, DOE awarded a contract to GE Corporate Research and Development for a three-year program that began in March 1985 and was completed in 1988. That program was divided into two parts: an Economic Assessment Study and a Technical Feasibility Study. The Economic Assessment Study evaluated the benefits to be derived from development of a coal-fueled diesel engine. Seven areas and their economic impact on the use of coal-fueled diesels were examined; impact on railroad infrastructure, expected maintenance cost, environmental considerations, impact of higher capital costs, railroad training and crew costs, beneficiated coal costs for viable economics, and future cost of money. The Technical Feasibility Study used laboratory- and bench-scale experiments to investigate the combustion of coal. The major accomplishments of this study were the development of injection hardware for coal water slurry (CWS) fuel, successful testing of CWS fuel in a full-size, single-cylinder, medium-speed diesel engine, evaluation of full-scale engine wear rates with metal and ceramic components, and the characterization of gaseous and particulate emissions. Full combustion of CWS fuel was accomplished at full and part load with reasonable manifold conditions.
Date: January 31, 1994
Creator: none,
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Rheology of coal-water slurries prepared by the HP roll mill grinding of coal. Quarterly technical progress report No. 5, September 1--November 30, 1993

Description: Research conducted during the Fifth Quarterly was aimed at the evaluation of the effect of a cationic surfactant, TMAE, on the rheology of coal suspensions and delineation of the effects of anionic, cationic and nonionic surfactants on the aggregation stability of Pittsburgh No. 8 coal-water slurries. The purpose of these studies was to improve the understanding of the behavior of coal-water slurries in the presence of chemical additives.
Date: December 1, 1993
Creator: Fuerstenau, D. W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Coal-water slurry sprays from an electronically controlled accumulator fuel injection system: Break-up distances and times

Description: Experiments have been completed to characterize coal-water slurry sprays from an electronically-controlled accumulator fuel injection system of a diesel engine. The sprays were injected into a pressurized chamber equipped with windows. High speed movies, fuel pressures and needle lifts were obtained as a function of time, orifice diameter, coal loading, gas density in the chamber, and accumulator fuel pressure. For the base conditions (50% (by man) coal loading, 0.4 mm diameter nozzle hole, coal-water slurry pressure of 82 MPa (12,000 psi), and a chamber density of 25 kg/m{sup 3}), the break-up time was 0.30 ms. An empirical correlation for spray tip penetration, break-up time and initial jet velocity was developed. For the conditions of this study, the spray tip penetration and initial jet velocity were 15% greater for coal-water slurry than for diesel fuel or water. Results of this study and the correlation are specific to the tested coal-water slurry and are not general for other coal-water slurry fuels.
Date: December 31, 1993
Creator: Caton, J. A.; Payne, S. E.; Terracina, D. P. & Kihm, K. D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development of a vortex combustor (VC) for space/water heating applications (combustion tests). Final report

Description: This is the final report for Interagency Agreement DE-AI22-87PC79660 on ``Combustion Test`` for vortex combustor (VC) development for commercial applications. The work culminated in the successful demonstration of a 2 MB/H proof-of-concept (POC) model firing coal-water fuel (CWF). This development is concerned with a new concept in combustion, and was a general lack of relevant information. The work therefore began (in addition to the companion cold flow modeling study) with the design and test of two subscale models (0.15 and 0.3 MB/H) and one full scale model (3 MB/H) to obtain the needed information. With the experience gained, the 2 MB/H POC model was then designed and demonstrated. Although, these models were designed somewhat differently from one another, they all performed well and demonstrated the superiority of the concept. In summary, test results have shown that VC can be fired on several coal fuels (CWF, dry ultrafine coal, utility grind pulverized coal) at high combustion efficiency (>99%), high firing intensity (up to 0.44 MB/H-ft{sup 3}), and at temperatures sufficiently low or dry ash removal. The combustion process is completed totally inside the combustor. Conventional combustion enhancement techniques such as: preheating (air and/or fuel), pre-combustion, and post combustion are not needed.
Date: November 1, 1990
Creator: Fu, T. T. & Nieh, S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development and testing of a commercial-scale coal-fired combustion system, Phase 3. Quarterly technical progress report No. 3, April 1, 1991--June 30, 1991

Description: Within the commercial sector, oil and natural gas are the predominant fuels used to meet the space-heating needs of schools, office buildings, apartment complexes, and other similar structures. In general, these buildings require firing rates of 1 to 10 million Btu/hr. The objective of this program is to demonstrate the technical and economic viability of a coal-fired combustion system for this sector. The commercial-scale coal-water slurry (CWS)-fired space heating system will be a scale-up of a CWS-fired residential warm-air heating system developed by Tecogen under contract to the Department of Energy, Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center. This system included a patented nonslagging combustor known as IRIS, for Inertial Reactor with Internal Separation. This combustion technology, which has demonstrated high combustion efficiency using CWS fuels at input rates of 100,000 Btu/hr, will be scaled to operate at 2 to 5 millon Btu/hr. Along with the necessary fuel storage and delivery, heat recovery, and control equipment, the system will include pollution control devices to meet targeted values of NO{sub x}, S0{sub 2}, and particulate emissions. In general, the system will be designed to match the reliability, safety, turndown, and ignition performance of gas or oil-fired systems.
Date: October 1, 1991
Creator: Litka, A. F. & Breault, R. W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels. Quarterly report No. 7, October 1990--December 1990

Description: During the fourth quarter of 1990, the following technical progress was made: (1) Calculated the kinetic characteristics of chars from the combustion of microbubble flotation beneficiated products; (2) continued drop tube combustion tests of the spherical oil agglomeration beneficiated products; (3) analyzed the data from three (MIT) pilot-scale combustion tests of the Upper Freeport feed coal; and (4) continued analyses of the data from the CE pilot-scale tests of nine fuels.
Date: February 1, 1991
Creator: Hargrove, M. J.; Chow, O. K. & Nsakala, N. Y.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Advanced coal-fueled gas turbine systems. Annual report, July 1990--June 1991

Description: The combustion system discussed here incorporates a modular three- stage slagging combustor concept. Fuel-rich conditions inhibit NO{sub x} formation from fuel nitrogen in the first stage; also in the first stage, sulfur is captured with sorbent; coal ash and sulfated sorbent are removed from the combustion gases by inertial means in the second stage by the use of an impact separator and slagging cyclone separator in series. Final oxidation of the fuel-rich gases, and dilution to achieve the desired turbine inlet conditions are accomplished in the third stage, which is maintained sufficiently lean so that here, too, NO{sub x} formation is inhibited. The objective of this contract is to establish the technology required for subsequent commercial development and application by the private sector of utility-size direct coal-fueled gas turbines. Emissions from these units are to meet or be lower than the Environment Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) for a pulverized coal-=fired steam turbine generator plant.
Date: September 1, 1991
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development of a use for Illinois coal concentrates for slurry fed gasifiers. [Quarterly] technical report, December 1, 1993--February 28, 1994

Description: The purpose of this project is to test concentrates made from preparation plant fines as to their amenability as feed for slurry fed, slagging, entrained-flow gasifiers. During the current reporting period, waste slurry samples were obtained from the washing plants associated with surface mining, underground mining from which the fines are not treated, underground mining from which a flotation concentrate is made from the washer plant waste fines, and from a tailing pile associated with one of the washing plants which had been deposited for over five years. Column flotation testing was conducted on representative samples of several of these. Using a typical flotation reagent requirement of kerosene and MIBC several tests showed outstanding results when the feed rate was kept at the nominal rate of 10 pounds per hour as suggested by the Deister Concentrator Company. The most encouraging test was conducted on waste fines from the surface plant. While the ash content in the clean coal concentrate was higher than expected, the calorific content in the tailing was 422 BTU/pound, which was at least twice as low as any tailings produced either in the laboratory or in plants during the last ten years of coal flotation research. In this same test 96.9% of the BTU`s were concentrated in the flotation product and 80.3% of the ash reported in the flotation tailing. Flotation results of the material which had been impounded for an extended period were encouraging as 67.7% of the BTU`s were concentrated in a product which contained 12,762 BTU/pound.
Date: June 1, 1994
Creator: Khan, L. A.; Lytle, J. M.; Khan, S.; At-Taras, M. & Ehrlinger, H. P. III
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The metered delivery of solids into pressure: A radically new machine concept

Description: This paper is the second published report on the continuing successful elaboration and embodiment of an entirely new patented machine concept for the continuous movement and accurately delivery of all sorts of particulate solids, wet or dry, into environments of ambient or differential fluid or mechanical pressure. It includes the first disclosure of the successful continuous, direct delivery of US power plant coal into 26 psi of gas pressure, which is itself an important milestone in a project for the continuing development of the system for very high pressure metered injection of solids. We call the device a ``Rock Pump.`` More finally, it is the Firth Solids Pump System, after the inventor.
Date: June 1, 1992
Creator: Hay, A. G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Coal diesel combined-cycle project. Comprehensive report to Congress: Clean Coal Technology Program

Description: One of the projects selected for funding is a project for the design, construction, and operation of a nominal 90 ton-per-day 14-megawatt electrical (MWe), diesel engine-based, combined-cycle demonstration plant using coal-water fuels (CWF). The project, named the Coal Diesel Combined-Cycle Project, is to be located at a power generation facility at Easton Utilities Commission`s Plant No. 2 in Easton, Talbot County, Maryland, and will use Cooper-Bessemer diesel engine technology. The integrated system performance to be demonstrated will involve all of the subsystems, including coal-cleaning and slurrying systems; a selective catalytic reduction (SCR) unit, a dry flue gas scrubber, and a baghouse; two modified diesel engines; a heat recovery steam generation system; a steam cycle; and the required balance of plant systems. The base feedstock for the project is bituminous coal from Ohio. The purpose of this Comprehensive Report is to comply with Public Law 102-154, which directs the DOE to prepare a full and comprehensive report to Congress on each project selected for award under the CCT-V Program.
Date: May 1, 1994
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Engineereing development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning for premium fuel applications. Quarterly technical progress report No. 5, October--December 1993

Description: This project is a major step in the Department of Energy`s program to show that ultra-clean coal-water slurry fuel (CWF) can be produced from selected coals and that this premium fuel will be a cost-effective replacement for oil and natural gas now fueling some of the industrial and utility boilers in the United States. The replacement of oil and gas with CWF can only be realized if retrofit costs are kept to a minimum and retrofit boiler emissions meet national goals for clean air. These concerns establish the specifications for maximum ash and sulfur levels and combustion properties of the CWF. The project has three major objectives: The primary objective is to develop the design base for prototype commercial advanced fine coal cleaning facilities capable of producing ultra-clean coals suitable for conversion to coal-water slurry fuel for premium fuel applications. The fine coal cleaning technologies are advanced column flotation and selective agglomeration. A secondary objective is to develop the design base for near-term application of these advanced fine coal cleaning technologies in new or existing coal preparation plants for efficiently processing minus 28-mesh coal fines and converting this to marketable products in current market economics. A third objective is to determine the removal of toxic trace elements from coal by advance column flotation and selective agglomeration technologies.
Date: February 18, 1994
Creator: Smit, F. J. & Jha, M. C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Coal-water slurry atomization characteristics

Description: The overall objective of this work was to fully characterize the CWS fuel sprays of a medium-speed diesel engine injection system. Specifically, the spray plume penetration as a function of time was determined for a positive-displacement fuel injection system. The penetration was determined as a function of orifice diameter, coal loading, gas density in the engine, and fuel line pressure. Preliminary droplet information also was obtained. The results of this study will assist CWS engine development by providing much needed insight about the fuel spray. In addition, the results will aid the development and use of CWS engine cycle simulations which require information on the fuel spray characteristics.
Date: April 1, 1994
Creator: Caton, J. A. & Kihm, K. D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Cyclone reburn using coal-water fuel: Pilot-scale development and testing. Final report

Description: There is an ongoing effort to develop retrofit technologies capable of converting oil- and/or gas-fired boilers to coal combustion. The objective of this project is to demonstrate the technical feasibility of an improved portion of a previously developed retrofit system designed for the purpose of converting oil/gas boilers. This improvement would almost entirely eliminate the use of premium fuels, thereby significantly increasing the economical attractiveness of the system. Specifically, the goals in this program were to replace natural gas as a reburning fuel with coal-water fuel (CWF). The advantages of such a system include: (1) increased return on investment (ROI) for conversions; (2) nearly complete elimination of premium oil or gas fuel; (3) a more integrated approach to the conversion of oil- or gas-designed boilers to CWF.
Date: October 1, 1991
Creator: Eckhart, C. F. & DeVault, R. F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Rheological properties essential for the atomization of coal water slurries (CWS). Quarterly progress report, September 15, 1993--December 15, 1993

Description: The overall objective of this project is to perform experiments to understand the effect of high shear and extensional properties on the atomization of coal-water slurries (CWS). In the atomization studies, the mean drop size of the CWS sprays will be determined at various air-to CWS. A correlation between the extensional and high shear properties, particle size distributions and the atomization will be made in order to determine the influence of these parameters on the atomization of CWS.
Date: May 1, 1994
Creator: Ohene, F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Effects of calcium magnesium acetate on the combustion of coal-water slurries. Fourteenth quarterly project status report, 1 December 1992--28 February 1993

Description: The general objective of the project is to investigate the combustion behavior of single and multiple Coal-Water Fuel (CWF) particles burning at high temperature environments. Both uncatalyzed as well as catalyzed CWF drops with Calcium Magnesium Acetate (CMA) catalyst will be studied. Emphasis will also be given in the effects of CMA on the sulfur capture during combustion. Over this period work concentrated in producing CWF agglomerates from pulverized-grain coal ({approx} 40{mu}m) and studying their pyrolysis and combustion behavior. Ash residues were also captured and examined. These results will serve as a basis for comparison with those obtained earlier for CWF with a micronized-grain coal ({approx} 3.5{mu}m).
Date: April 1, 1993
Creator: Levendis, Y. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

[Basic properties of coals and other solids]. Eighth quarterly report, [September--November 1991]

Description: This report discusses basic properties of bituminous, subbituminous, and lignite coals. Properties of coal liquids are also investigated. Heats of immersion in strong acids are found for Pittsburgh {number_sign}8, Illinois {number_sign}6, and Wyodak coals. Production of coal liquids by distillation is discussed. Heats of titration of coal liquids and coal slurries are reported. (VC)
Date: November 25, 1991
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Rheological properties essential for the atomization of coal water slurries (CWS). Quarterly progress report, December 15, 1992--March 15, 1993

Description: The overall objective of this project is to perform experiments to understand the effect of high shear and extensional properties on the atomization of coal-water slurries (CWS). In the atomization studies, the mean drop size of the CWS sprays will be determined at various air-to CWS. A correlation between the extensional and high shear properties, particle size distributions and the atomization will be made in order to determine the influence of these parameters on the atomization of CWS. During this past quarter, an attempt was made to establish a theoretical relationship between the sauter mean diameter, (SMD), theAir/Fuel ratio and the viscosity. Also the effect of polymeric additives on the rheology of glycerol was studied.
Date: June 1, 1993
Creator: Ohene, F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Advanced Coal-Fueled Gas Turbine Program. Final report

Description: The objective of the original Request for Proposal was to establish the technological bases necessary for the subsequent commercial development and deployment of advanced coal-fueled gas turbine power systems by the private sector. The offeror was to identify the specific application or applications, toward which his development efforts would be directed; define and substantiate the technical, economic, and environmental criteria for the selected application; and conduct such component design, development, integration, and tests as deemed necessary to fulfill this objective. Specifically, the offeror was to choose a system through which ingenious methods of grouping subcomponents into integrated systems accomplishes the following: (1) Preserve the inherent power density and performance advantages of gas turbine systems. (2) System must be capable of meeting or exceeding existing and expected environmental regulations for the proposed application. (3) System must offer a considerable improvement over coal-fueled systems which are commercial, have been demonstrated, or are being demonstrated. (4) System proposed must be an integrated gas turbine concept, i.e., all fuel conditioning, all expansion gas conditioning, or post-expansion gas cleaning, must be integrated into the gas turbine system.
Date: February 1, 1989
Creator: Horner, M. W.; Ekstedt, E. E.; Gal, E.; Jackson, M. R.; Kimura, S. G.; Lavigne, R. G. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Effects of calcium magnesium acetate on the combustion of coal-water slurries. Thirteenth Quarterly project status report, 1 September 1992--30 November 1992

Description: Production of CWF agglomerates of pulverized coal grind has commenced. A bituminous coal PSOC 1451 HVA coal has been obtained from the Penn State Coal Sample Bank, size classified in the 38-45{mu}m range. This coal was mixed with water (40 % solids) and with 1% ammonium lignosulfonate as a dispersant. Generation of pre-dried CWF agglomerates has been conducted in a thermal reactor, as described at an earlier report. The solenoid actuator-driven single drop generator is used fitted with different size needle-plunger combinations. During the present, 14th quarter, the following tasks are being conducted: (a) Measure the gas temperature profiles in the new furnace and recalibrate the pyrometer. (b) Generate an inventory of CWF agglomerates of different coal grinds and carbon black with and without CMA. (c) Conduct high temperature experiments to identify differences in the combustion behavior of agglomerates of different coal grinds, and (d) efforts will be conducted to capture the resulting ash particles for visual observations.
Date: December 31, 1992
Creator: Levendis, Y. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning for premium fuel applications. Quarterly technical progress report No. 1, October--December 1992

Description: This project is a step in the Department of Energy`s program to show that ultra-clean fuel can be produced from selected coals and that the fuel will be a cost-effective replacement for oil and natural gas now fueling boilers in this country. The replacement of premium fossil fuels with coal can only be realized if retrofit costs are kept to a minimum and retrofit boiler emissions meet national goals for clean air. These concerns establish the specifications for maximum ash and sulfur levels and combustion properties of the ultra-clean coal. The primary objective is to develop the design base for prototype commercial advanced fine coal cleaning facilities capable of producing ultra-clean coals suitable for conversion to coal-water slurry fuel. The fine coal cleaning technologies are advanced column flotation and selective agglomeration. A secondary objective is to develop the design base for near-term commercial integration of advanced fine coal cleaning technologies in new or existing coal preparation plants for economically and efficiently processing minus 28-mesh coal fines. A third objective is to determine the distribution of toxic trace elements between clean coal and refuse when applying the advance column flotation and selective agglomeration technologies. The project team consists of Amax Research & Development Center (Amax R&D), Amax Coal industries, Bechtel Corporation, Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER) at the University of Kentucky, and Arcanum Corporation.
Date: January 18, 1993
Creator: Smit, F. J. & Jha, M. C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development and use of an apparatus to measure the dynamic surface properties of coal-water slurry fuels for applications to atomization characteristics. Quarterly technical report, November 1, 1992--January 31, 1993

Description: The Texas A&M University (TAMU) has been awarded a DOE contract to study dynamic properties and atomization characteristics of coal-water slurry (CWS) fuels. Additives are essential for better mixing and stable suspension of coal powders and these additives change CWS properties. Dynamic properties will have major effects on CWS fuel atomization, which constitutes highly dynamic processes, and will determine the combustion as well as the pollutant formation behaviors. The dynamic surface tension of CWS fuels can be much higher than the corresponding static surface tension. Experimental study of correlating the atomization characteristics and dynamic properties of CWS fuels will be performed during the contract period. The research projects consists of five tasks. Task 1 selects appropriate additives and surfactants for CWS fuels by measuring the stabilizing characteristics and critical micelle concentrations (CMC). Task 2 implements the dynamic surface tensiometer operating based on the formation of maximum bubble pressure. Task 3 measures dynamic properties of CWS fuels as functions of bubble frequency while the fuel parameters are varied. The fuel parameters include coal loading, type of stabilizer and type of surfactant. Task 4 will devise a CWS fuel spray system and Task 5 will measure the spray droplet sizes using a laser diffraction technique.
Date: January 31, 1993
Creator: Kihm, K. D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Roles of additives and surface control in slurry atomization. Final project report

Description: This project studies the rheology and airblast atomization of micronized coal slurries. Its major objectives are (1) to promote further understanding of the mechanisms and the roles of additives in airblast atomization of coal water slurry (CWS), and (2) to investigate the impacts of coal particle surface properties and interparticle forces on CWS rheology. We have found that the flow behavior index (n) of a suspension (or slurry) is determined by the relative importance of the interparticle van der Waals attraction and the interparticle electrostatic repulsion. The interparticle attraction, measured by the Hamaker constant scaled to the thermal energy at 25{degrees}C (A/kT), causes particle aggregation, which breaks down at high shear rates, and thus leads to slurry pseudoplastic behavior (n< 1). At a constant particle volume fraction and surface charge density (qualitatively measured by the zeta potential in deionized water), n decreases linearly as A/kT increases. The relative viscosity of the pseudoplastic suspension with respect to that of the suspending liquid is found to be independent of particle density and correlate well with the particle Peclet number which equals the particle diffusional relaxation time multiplied by shear rate. Specifically, the relative viscosities of the pseudoplastic glycerol/water coal slurry and the ethylene glycol/glycerol sand slurry, at same volume fractions as well as similar particle size distributions and liquid viscosities, as functions of the particle Peclet number fall along the same line.
Date: December 31, 1992
Creator: Tsai, S. C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Coal-water slurry spray characteristics of an electronically-controlled accumulator fuel injection system

Description: Experiments have been complete to characterize coal-water slurry sprays from a electronically-controlled accumulator fuel injection system of diesel engine. The sprays were injected into a pressurized chamber equipped with windows. High speed movies, fuel pressures and needle lifts were obtained as a function of time, orifice diameter, coal loading, gas density in the chamber, and accumulator fuel pressure. For the base conditions 50% (by mass) coal loading, 0.4 mm diameter nozzle hole, coal-water slurry pressure of 82 MPa (12,000 psi), and a chamber density of 25 kg/m{sup 3}, the break-up time was 0. 30 ms. An empirical correlation for both spray tip penetration and initial jet velocity was developed. For the conditions of this study, the spray tip penetration and initial jet velocity were 15% greater for coal-water slurry than for diesel fuel or water. Cone angles of the sprays were dependent on the operating conditions and fluid, as well as the time and locations of the measurement. The time-averaged cone angle for the base case conditions was 13.6{degree}. Results of this study and the correlation are specific to the tested coal-water slurry and are not general for other coal-water slurry fuels.
Date: December 31, 1993
Creator: Caton, J. A.; Payne, S. E.; Terracina, D. P. & Kihm, K. D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A computational model for coal transport and combustion. Quarterly technical progress report, December 1, 1992--February 28, 1993

Description: In the period of December 1, 1992 to February 28, 1993, further progress was made in using the thermodynamically consistent, rate dependent model for turbulent two-phase flows analysis. The effect of particle Reynolds number on variations of the fluctuation kinetic energy with the solid volume fraction for the special case of a simple shear flow was analyzed. Additional results for the application of the kinetic model for rapid flows of granular materials, which includes frictional losses were obtained. The velocity profile for granular gravity flow down an inclined chute, including slip velocity at the wall were obtained, and the results were compared with the data of Drake and Shreve and Johnson et al. The computational model for rapid granular and two-phase flows in complex geometries was further developed. The discrete element scheme was used and the granular flow down a chute was analyzed. The results are compared with the experimental data model prediction of Savage, and the simulation results of Campbell and Brennen. The experimental monolayer simple shear flow device was modified to allow for shearing of 12 mm multi-color glass particles. The device was reassembled and made fully operational. Sample videos of the granular motions are obtained. Developing a software for analyzing video images was initiated.
Date: May 1, 1993
Creator: Ahmadi, G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department